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I am not a CAR GUY to know a lot about mechanics...

I just worry that my car takes me to point A to point B as comfortable as possible, quite, good ride and safely.

On my test ride the ASCENT does that...

Dont know why everyone trash the CVT thing..

I drove a traverse.. that thing is noisy, the trim looks outdated no technology on the lower end models.

could someone explain or whats your opinion?
 

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There are some people that just don't like change, even though it may be for the better. They are used to the traditional MT and AT trannies, where the the head snap and jerk of gear changes makes them feel more in touch with the car and engine. The CVT is just too smooth and functional for them. Most MT drivers readily admit they chose a manual because they are more "fun" to drive.



The older CVTs especially non-Subaru ones, did have some undesirable high rev drone and rubber band effects with heavy acceleration. However, the current ones are much more refined,... very smooth and quiet. Subaru is often mentioned as having the best CVT (just like their AWD).


I am on my 2nd CVT with my Subaru (other one is a Toyota), and it is the best tranny I have every driven,... by far. Not just smooth, but very responsive as well with the pedal. Best thing to do is go for a test ride and judge for yourself.
 

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I am not a CAR GUY to know a lot about mechanics...

I just worry that my car takes me to point A to point B as comfortable as possible, quite, good ride and safely.

On my test ride the ASCENT does that...

Dont know why everyone trash the CVT thing..

I drove a traverse.. that thing is noisy, the trim looks outdated no technology on the lower end models.

could someone explain or whats your opinion?
That's what the Ascent is meant to do. This is my 5th Subaru since 2010 and I feel it is the best product for the money. Understand Subaru's present the best value in mid trim. I'm not saying a fully decked out Touring is not a great deal for 47k but all the core goodies are the same for 10-15k less. This car is extremely safe, comfortable and has good room for most families but it ain't no Tahoe in the room department. I think 2-3 kids max would be it's comfort zone and that's with space for all the stuff that goes with that.
 

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I tend to agree that people are pushing back against change. People have become very accustomed to the sound and feel as the engine revs steadily climb, then drop suddenly as the car accelerates. It provides feedback in terms of what the car is doing - as the revs climb, you sense that you are going faster. With early CVTs they would optimize the gear ratio to match the situation...if you are accelerating full throttle, they would constantly adjust the ratio to be near maximum power...but by doing so the engine revs don't climb, and instead stay at a fairly constant speed. It's disconcerting at first, even if you understand (and like) what is happening...but most people don't know / care how their car works, and as a result they are turned off by the "it never shifts" sensation.

More recently they have updated the CVTs to simulate a normal automatic by putting in faux gear changes...Probably the right thing to do from a marketing perspective, but it drives engineers crazy because it gives up some of the main advantages of a CVT. However, I have found that my 2016 outback does pretty well overall. It simulates shifts while accelerating, but as best I can tell it freely varies the CVT ratio when cruising or climbing a steep grade etc...On the highway we get 31 mpg (indicated), and I credit the CVT for at least some of that fuel economy.

I do wish there was a way to put my CVT into "true CVT" mode, but on the whole I think what they have done is OK...particularly if it makes the CVT more palatable to the masses.

Also, CVTs have historically been considered unreliable / too weak to be used in cars, and early attempts did have problems. There might be some lingering stigma from the early attempts, but I bet most people don't even know what a CVT is, much less the historical problems they might have had.
 

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Good question....I had the same concern. My problem was not so much with the CVT noise and lack of feel when shifting....but more with some of reliability problems I was reading about. I have had two recent Outbacks with no issues. I have no issue with the way the CVT drives either. But was a little concerned when some posts were expressing concerns with major issues after the warranty period. I am hoping this is only a small population. I did a little research and almost every manufacturer has reported transmission issues.
 

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All modern Automatics that are non cvt are 6-10 speed machines. They have in some cases 3x the moving parts in them than cvts with similar gear ratio options. From a mechanical stand point cvt transmissions should be / will be far cheaper and more reliable than the 3x complexity in the 6-10 geared automatics.

The negativity as pointed out comes from early efforts that weren’t executed all that well. I’m still an owner of two 2010 Subaru cvts zero issues. Also a 2016 ford/Toyota cvt owner which is quite good. No fake shifts in the Ford Fusion Energi.
 

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My only criticism of the CVT is that there is no required fluid change interval unless you are towing, according to the maintenance guide. My personal opinion is that replacing the fluid at regular intervals - just like you would do if you had the 4/5EAT's from before the CVT - is that the fluid will replace the additive packages again in the same way that oil changes are both a time and a mileage criteria.

For what it's worth, Subaru Canada requires CVTF changes every 60k miles (100k kilometers) because of "severe climates associated with the Canadian landscape" - so I'm guessing it's something to do with thermal cycles.

I'm personally planning to do the 60k interval for my car regardless of model.

My local dealership is also saying that their technicians are suggesting a CVTF change at 60k if the owner is intending on keeping the car beyond 100k miles.
 

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I was under the understanding that if you meet "severe conditions" it's every 25k
There are footnotes on the side of the maintenance guide. It will say Note 1,3,5 or something like that. The one related to the CVTF says that it is only if you are towing.

The severe things you’re mentioning are generally tied to the oil changes.
 

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Just passed 1000 miles on my new Ascent Touring. Love it. Tranny seems PERFECT. Java interior is super sweet too. Like the 7 passenger layout. Kids are grown. Just wish I could get my rear passenger door to OPEN??
Certain that will be fixed soon.
 

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I'm on the opposite end of the spectrum.

I hate that they programmed in *shifts* into the CVT. I want a smooth pull, give me the drone or at least an option for the drone.

I get they don't want complaining about droning but a CVT is far superior to a standard transmission. Put the motor at peak power and vary the transmission! Snowmobile! Pull the throttle and you just go. That's what I want from the CVT but I get these nasty jerky fake shifts under light to moderate throttle.

Give me an option in an update!
 

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My local dealership is also saying that their technicians are suggesting a CVTF change at 60k if the owner is intending on keeping the car beyond 100k miles.
Oh, so if you plan on selling it or trading it with around 100K miles, scr*w the next owner huh? It sounds more like everyone should be on a 60K interval. 100K miles (only?) is a throw away car.
 

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I want a CVT that acts like a CVT

I'm on the opposite end of the spectrum.

I hate that they programmed in *shifts* into the CVT. I want a smooth pull, give me the drone or at least an option for the drone.

I get they don't want complaining about droning but a CVT is far superior to a standard transmission. Put the motor at peak power and vary the transmission! Snowmobile! Pull the throttle and you just go. That's what I want from the CVT but I get these nasty jerky fake shifts under light to moderate throttle.

Give me an option in an update!
I SOOOOO agree with this. Don't get me wrong, this is the absolute best feeling "fautomatic" transmission I've ever driven, but, it's a CVT, and numerous of the advantages of having a CVT are programmed OUT of it to appease the people who want it to feel like an automatic (or who are scared of a CVT).


If you're one of those people who really want something that feels like an automatic, you'll love it. If you're one of the people who appreciate all of the benefits a CVT brings over an automatic, you will be saddened by how the CVT is hobbled by making it pretend to be an 8 speed automatic. You may, like me, be impressed with how well it pretends, but that doesn't change the fact that the transmission will never show what it's really capable of - not as long as it's pretending to be a multi-geared 8 speed automatic. :sad:
 

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What would be really fun would be independent control of the cvt and the throttle. Instead of shifting "gears" when you move the gear selector into M with the paddles you could just hold it back until you hit the ratio that you wanted. I work on AGCO application equipment and their cvt's work like that. Imagine putting your engine right there in the sweet spot of the torque curve and letting it eat as you just adjust your trans ratios.
 

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That's what the Ascent is meant to do. This is my 5th Subaru since 2010 and I feel it is the best product for the money. Understand Subaru's present the best value in mid trim. I'm not saying a fully decked out Touring is not a great deal for 47k but all the core goodies are the same for 10-15k less. This car is extremely safe, comfortable and has good room for most families but it ain't no Tahoe in the room department. I think 2-3 kids max would be it's comfort zone and that's with space for all the stuff that goes with that.
Fully decked out Tahoes run for 70K . LOL... Even if it's base, its 40k to start. NO THANKS, I can get a truck and an ascent for 70k.
 

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Just passed 1000 miles on my new Ascent Touring. Love it. Tranny seems PERFECT. Java interior is super sweet too. Like the 7 passenger layout. Kids are grown. Just wish I could get my rear passenger door to OPEN??
Certain that will be fixed soon.
we're at 820, less than 1 month of ownership love the ride. And my wife's not even going to work now, on maternity leave. Imagine how many more miles we can rack if it was a daily driver.

We were in stop and go traffic for about 20 minutes and I used the AVH, it was pretty cool.

CVT is fine.. just another technologically advancement in how machinery works. EV cars have no transmission yet no one complains. LOL
 

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Oh, so if you plan on selling it or trading it with around 100K miles, scr*w the next owner huh? It sounds more like everyone should be on a 60K interval. 100K miles (only?) is a throw away car.
I have no idea about their motives. Service is where a dealership makes money long-term, so I would think they would be pushing harder for the 60k fluid change.
 

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Oh, so if you plan on selling it or trading it with around 100K miles, scr*w the next owner huh? It sounds more like everyone should be on a 60K interval. 100K miles (only?) is a throw away car.
It's not the first non-service item they've had. The Gen 2 viscous couplings in the manual transmissions was a sealed unit. For those that don't know, there's special fluid in the viscous couplings that, along with a 25 plate clutch pack, determines how power is transmitted front or rear. Under normal circumstances, it's a 50/50 power split. It's an entirely mechanical/fluid-dynamics based system, with the fluid itself determining the slip or grip on the plates that transfer power to the front and/or rear.

I am one of the few people on the planet that had to have a Gen 2 viscous coupling "serviced" (replaced, since it's a sealed unit). But, I beat the heck out of my transmission on the beach (including towing an STI on the beach), in the snow and on trails. Lasted to 180,000 miles.

Regardless, it's probably a cheap service (replacing the fluid on the CVT), and probably worth it at some point between 60K and 100K miles for normal driving. I for one know I am shooting for 300,000 miles on my Ascent.
 

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It's not the first non-service item they've had. The Gen 2 viscous couplings in the manual transmissions was a sealed unit. For those that don't know, there's special fluid in the viscous couplings that, along with a 25 plate clutch pack, determines how power is transmitted front or rear. Under normal circumstances, it's a 50/50 power split. It's an entirely mechanical/fluid-dynamics based system, with the fluid itself determining the slip or grip on the plates that transfer power to the front and/or rear.

I am one of the few people on the planet that had to have a Gen 2 viscous coupling "serviced" (replaced, since it's a sealed unit). But, I beat the heck out of my transmission on the beach (including towing an STI on the beach), in the snow and on trails. Lasted to 180,000 miles.

Regardless, it's probably a cheap service (replacing the fluid on the CVT), and probably worth it at some point between 60K and 100K miles for normal driving. I for one know I am shooting for 300,000 miles on my Ascent.
It's is around 300.00 for the CVT drain and re-fill. Some folks have done it themselves but I would let the dealer do this one
 
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