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I have four drivers in my family. We tend to keep our vehicles longer than five years. The kids have used cars and used factory rims can be had cheap. It's to the point where i won't flinch to invest in a cheap set of four used rims. As I said, Factory Alloys aren't all that expensive. Then buying for dedicated snows, it's not really costing more. It's like having two pairs of shoes and only wearing them half as much. My kids have FWD and I just feel soo much better knowing the capability is much better in snow. My truck has all terrains and they do well year round All Terrain LOL. My wife has an AWD Honda crosstour right now and it's like a tank with the snows. Had Two Subarus in the past, and there's nothing quite like the feeling of running right past other SUV's off on the side of the road with all season tires, knowing the snows are fully capable. The only obstacle at that point is deep snow if there isn't a ton clearance.

It kinda sucks is having to change four rims on four vehicles every spring and fall lol. But when it snows and anyone is going anywhere my mind is pretty much at ease.

Peace,

Joe
 

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I purchased a set of winter tires for my 2019 Ascent and my son did the same for his 2018 Impreza. So far it has made a big difference. We look forward to the rest of our Colorado winters.
 

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I put winter tires and wheels on all of my cars. I won't compromise the safety of my family. I live in an area where we get snow for a good enough portion of the year that it's a necessity, especially going up to our other house in the hills, where the roads aren't always plowed.

For me it's not so much about getting moving (all of my cars are all wheel drive), it's about cornering and stopping.
 

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If I lived in an area that got appreciable snow and cold weather, I'd likely consider having dedicated true-winter tires.
 
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Yes we run dedicated snow tires on both cars. Michelin x-ice xi2 on our Ascent and Bridgestone Blizzak Dm-v2s on the Impreza.

We live in south central Montana with cold weather, snow and ice.
 

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If you drive in much snow slush or ice for more than two months a year I’d consider it. I never used to until I moved to a place that had mountains. All previous winter driving was ‘relatively’ flat. What a difference even on a great AWD Subaru.
I’ve always stuck with non studded Hakkas but this year thought I’d try the hakka9 studded.
 

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If you drive in much snow slush or ice for more than two months a year I’d consider it. I never used to until I moved to a place that had mountains. All previous winter driving was ‘relatively’ flat. What a difference even on a great AWD Subaru.
I’ve always stuck with non studded Hakkas but this year thought I’d try the hakka9 studded.
That's the key thing most people forget, especially with horrible comparisons out there, even from some professional mags.

No matter what anyone drives, they should always use the right tires for their needs. For instance, I'd never use the OEM tires for mudding. That'd be a costly towing bill, lol!!!

The most dangerous thing I've found about Subaru's stellar AWD is that because it is so adept at plowing through everything, it gives people a false sense of confidence. With its high ground clearance and always on AWD, it has a ridiculously easier time getting moving in snow or on ice where the part time systems out there fail or struggle.

Problem is, stopping and steering control on ice or slippery snow is heavily affected by the choice of tires, no matter what car, no matter whether 2WD, part time AWD (everyone else in the class) , full-time AWD (like our Ascents), 4WD, or 4x4.

I do heavy and deep snow driving, but not every day or tremendously often, even. I chose the highest snow rated 3PMSF all terrains.

If I lived in the mountains of Vermont, I'd be debating on getting a snow tire set.

If I lived in Alaska, or Watertown or these other areas that are regularly covered in snow and below zero, I'd get winter snow tires.

If I lived in Florida, I would miss the snow, and run any all terrain or street tire that met my fancy.

There is no right or singular answer to the question. Other than get the right tire for where you live and what you drive through.
 

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There is no right or singular answer to the question. Other than get the right tire for where you live and what you drive through.
^ This, +eleventybillion.

I'm definitely one of those folks who switch to winter tires - and for anyone who knows me either from here or other Subaru communities (be they online or off/live), they'll testify to the fact that I'm kinda fanatical about them ( one keen-eyed member did some quick math in his head about my winter tire, er......habit? - https://www.ascentforums.com/threads/factory-tires-ok-for-snow.2607/page-3#post-121129 ). :D

That said, I'm also the first to wave the warning flag to those who would seek winter tires as some form of magical cure-all for their wintering needs.

Sadly, it's just not as simple as either oldthink "snow tire" myths or catchy modern marketing drivel would have us believe.

There's always a trade-off, and if we translate the enlargement of the performance envelope that these winter tires give us in wintry conditions to our "safety" on the roads, we must be willing to accept the realities of these trade-offs. Unfortunately, no tire -yet- can do it all equally as well.

We Subaru enthusiasts tend to go off the deep end both with our summer/track/race tires as well as our wintering sets. For the masses, the accessibility of winter tires as well as the stronger marketing push just adds to the peer-pressure. It's hard for newbies to rationally think through this purchase, with all the buzz and excitement in the online Forums and social-media groups about winter tires...sometimes as soon as we cross Independence Day, but often peaking as the weather turns cooler and we start to see various European winter tire test results start to pop up here, stateside.

For those considering winter tires, I would urge you to read through the following threads:





As you read through the above threads, keep the following in-mind:

(1) Resist marketing catchphrases -

Know that modern, quantitative testing undertaken by world-respected enthusiast publications and various consumer groups have all noted that "All Season" tires do -NOT- actually just turn into hockey pucks when temperatures head towards freezing. The catchphrase of "45-deg. F./7-deg. C. and change" is -NOT- supported by modern data that spans from 15-years ago to even literally this past year's winter tire tests. The differences come in when there's actually frozen precipitation on the ground.

Similarly, critically evaluate your winter tire needs apart from what advertisments or other vested parties may try to impress upon you. Those who do most of their miles on groomed main thoroughfares or highways have a different winter tire need versus those who must work their way through unmaintained side-roads or must head-out/return-home before/after municipal road treatment start in the morning or trail-off for the evening. Don't let a supposed "tire specialist" who is states away from you and who do not intimately understand your local conditions or who may not have listened to your needs decide what sub-genre of winter tire is actually better/best for you.

(2) Dump the old fashioned thinking of our parents and their parents -

Long gone are the days when studded tires mean certain death when there's rain on the road, or that "snow tires" cannot be safely driven for extended periods at highway speeds.

Similarly, "narrower" doesn't automatically translate into better traction in all wintry conditions or for all sub-genres of winter tires.

(3) Realize that no matter your tires, if you are traveling too fast for conditions, you're still asking for trouble. :) Winter tires can tremendously increase your performance envelope in wintry conditions, but they cannot overcome physics. Subaru's wonderful AWD system helps tremendously in terms of getting us going and keeping us going when roads are slippery, but just remember, we are all slaves to the laws of physics. :)
 

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Here is a new study proving that choosing the right type of tire for your local conditions is vital. As stated above, there is no one type of tire that is right for everyone in every climate. You need to choose wisely.

 

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^^^ yeah. You can always out drive the available traction no matter the tires or conditions. We tend to think of something like stopping distance as the dependent variable and speed as the independent variable. For example, at 30 mph tire A will stop in 100 feet and tire B in 130 feet. You can look at it the other way. Tire A will stop in 100 feet going 30mph while tire B will stop in 100 feet at 25 mph. Irrespective of the tires I have, I try do drive at a speed that gives adequate margin by testing traction frequently and adjusting speed appropriately. Better tires just means I can drive a little faster with the same margins.
 

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I never used to until I moved to a place that had mountains. All previous winter driving was ‘relatively’ flat.
This

I learned how to drive in the snow with a RWD 240SX on bad summer tires and did fine (SUPER cautious, but manageable). All driving was 'flat', so it was fine. When I moved to Utah and now that I'm in the PNW Cascades, tires get real important real quick, especially when descending from a mountain.
 

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Here is a new study proving that choosing the right type of tire for your local conditions is vital. As stated above, there is no one type of tire that is right for everyone in every climate. You need to choose wisely.

Most interesting!

It looks like they made a follow-up to the one that I initially cited last month: https://www.ascentforums.com/thread...cold-dry-roads-versus-all-seasons-tires.8765/

But yup, it looks like what they observed aligns with the mass of the European/Scandinavian/Russian testing from the last decade-and-a-half.

Which is why I find the conclusion that they drew to be weird....despite both the All-Season and the CrossClimate ("All Weather") tires out-performing the winter tires at both the wet and dry braking tests by clear margins even at temperatures well below 7 deg. C/45-deg. F, the presenter still pays homage to the "45-deg. F./7-deg. C. and change" cliche/catchphrase?

Maybe what he meant is just about switching from summer tires? ;)

Folks - pay attention that the presenter above is talking about summer tires, when he's speaking of that magical "change tires" temperature.

Take a look at the raw data and don't just skip to the conclusion of the video above.

Understand that with an "All Season" or "All Weather" tire, the actual traction advantages from winter tires really comes in only when there's frozen precipitation on the roadway, and importantly, when there's not, the very same compromises that gives the tire advantages on frozen precipitation will exact sacrifices in clear (of frozen precipitation) conditions, both dry and wet.
 

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We're on our 5th Subaru, the Ascent, and our 6th set of Michelin X-Ice tires, one set was on a Honda Pilot. We live in the Pacific Northwest 40 miles from the Canadian border. We get all kinds of weather, and definitely have our share of frozen stuff on the road .For years I had to be at work 35 miles away by 6:30 AM. Given those conditions, dedicated snow tires were a necessity for safety. There were a few time when I got to work in time get the company e-mail to stay home due to the weather :). Yes, a Subaru, with its superb AWD system will get you going in almost any conditions. However, on black ice, or compact snow and ice the tires keep you from sliding off the road or sliding into someone. A good set of snow tires is much less expensive than one accident!
 

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IMHO, if you can afford a 20k, 30k, 40k+ SUV, you can afford snow tires and for your own safety, lowering insurance costs and the safety of others; run them if you live anywhere the snow persists. One fender bender and you are out $500 with most deductibles, and then your rates go up if you were at fault. Also, your summer tires will last LONGER as they are not spinning constantly and wearing out prematurely. Your brakes will last LONGER as the Ascent uses the ABS system to gain traction over an axle. If you have grip, it will not engage as much. If you have slippery all-seasons, the brakes are going to be constantly engaging trying to get you traction.

It amazes me that people change shoes for different weather don't put the same thought into a 2 ton+ vehicle that barrels down the road at high speed.

I run Toyo snow tires. I went with them for the price, as there are not many options in the wheel size for the Limited. However, they are much, much safer in the snow than the factory Falkens. On my Audi Q5, I run Coopers and they are better by far than the Toyos in forward, lateral and braking grip. They are probably the best snows I've ever owned.

BTW, I live in Erie, PA, south of 90. Most years we get 150-200 inches of snow, and during the season changes ice/slush mixes.
 
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