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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently viewed Rob Mauro’s YouTube on how to remove a spare tire from Ascent (very helpful +)
and it had me wondering what a basic tool kit might be to have on board.

I liked his use of the hand drill to raise and lower the tire, but can it also remove lug nuts? I’ve had crappy luck with crappy hand drills and dead-lifeless batteries.

Can anyone recommend a decent drill to have for removing a tire lug nut from your camper trailer should the need arise? Would this have to be an impact driver? Reading the reviews and watching product demonstration video does not clarify what could be sufficient and handy to keep in the Ascent for car or travel trailer use. (Kobalt from Loewes, Bosch, Milwaukee, DeWalt, Makita, Craftsman, Rigid, Ryobi………..)

Any must-have tools/emergency items to have on board?, ie-roll of duct tape
 

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Recently viewed Rob Mauro’s YouTube on how to remove a spare tire from Ascent (very helpful +)
and it had me wondering what a basic tool kit might be to have on board.

I liked his use of the hand drill to raise and lower the tire, but can it also remove lug nuts? I’ve had crappy luck with crappy hand drills and dead-lifeless batteries.

Can anyone recommend a decent drill to have for removing a tire lug nut from your camper trailer should the need arise? Would this have to be an impact driver? Reading the reviews and watching product demonstration video does not clarify what could be sufficient and handy to keep in the Ascent for car or travel trailer use. (Kobalt from Loewes, Bosch, Milwaukee, DeWalt, Makita, Craftsman, Rigid, Ryobi………..)

Any must-have tools/emergency items to have on board?, ie-roll of duct tape
The Rigid tools are generally slightly heavier than other brands but they are guaranteed for life and that includes the batteries. As long as you keep a spare battery and a charger with you, you will not have an issue (spare battery is for convenience to not have to wait for the recharge). The regular drivers have a smaller chuck so you would need an adapter to drive a larger socket (they also will have less torque than what I list below). A driver would probably work fine unless you can see a need for a drill and a range of bits to keep with you. In that case you might for space reasons choose to have the drill and use it as a driver (they do have a clutch although their clutch set up is different). I would suggest try the Rigid driver on the lug nuts with impact sockets and adapters. If they are not to your liking, you can always return them to HD. If you are using the driver for mostly wheels lug nuts than you might choose to start out with this (If you do not already have Rigid tools you will need a charger and 18V battery).
 

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It's actually an impact wrench, so I can easily remove tires. It is a ridiculously cheap Amazon-sold tool, that's lasted through two years (to the day - Prime 2 Day arrival on July 14, 2018) of regular use - mostly on other people's cars that I find on my journeys, and to rotate or change out my tires. I've only charged it once, and used it multiple dozens of times. It is no longer available at that link. I've used it summer and winter.
4539

I have a lug nut socket kit that I also use - you saw the "Subaru" 19mm on the impact gun. I bought the whole set, because I found the Subaru one doesn't fit a lot of other cars. You only need a 19mm for both lug nuts and the winch.

They make torque adapters for the impact guns, that offer some level of horrible to decent accuracy. I own one of those too, but, for anything serious, I use my big torque wrench.

Other than that, I have a full socket set, screwdrivers, pliers, a couple wrenches, etc.

I am probably switching it out with my Ryobi impact gun (I am currently carrying both since I got my Ryobi 2 months ago), simply because it means one battery - I use a Ryobi air compressor when I off road, so, having a shared battery is nice.
4540


I am actually working on a video showing my entire off-roading kit. Hope to finish it next week.
 

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Additional Short List:
  • These instead of road flares: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B07DD174ZQ/
    (this kit is amazing)
  • gaffer's tape (instead of duct tape)
  • rain poncho(s) (simple throw away thing)
  • reflective safety vest(s) (eg: like construction workers wear)
  • Small jump pack (I usually dont have mine in my car, because I always have the big one for its 1000W AC inverter and built in battery)
  • Wheel chocks (two, plastic, stackable, are fine)
  • manual tire pressure gauge (eg: simple stick gauge, not battery operated - though I have digital ones too)

All of that, and everything from my earlier post, all fit in the floor in the cargo area.
 

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First things I added to the under floor compartment: 1/2" drive breaker bar, 1/2" drive ratchet handle, 2"extension, 4" extension, 19mm socket. Power tools are nice but you have to make sure they're charged. These hand tools are always ready and all I need to raise or lower the spare and remove lug nuts.
 

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First things I added to the under floor compartment: 1/2" drive breaker bar, 1/2" drive ratchet handle, 2"extension, 4" extension, 19mm socket. Power tools are nice but you have to make sure they're charged. These hand tools are always ready and all I need to raise or lower the spare and remove lug nuts.
Yes, agreed. I have this buried in there too. It folds flat, and can slide on the center point to make it into a breaker bar.
4541


Never had to use it since the cheap OEMTools lasts so long on a charge. And, my chargers are always in the car too.

TBH, I pack waaaaaay too much stuff. :ROFLMAO:
 

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First things I added to the under floor compartment: 1/2" drive breaker bar, 1/2" drive ratchet handle, 2"extension, 4" extension, 19mm socket. Power tools are nice but you have to make sure they're charged. These hand tools are always ready and all I need to raise or lower the spare and remove lug nuts.
I agree that power tools are great but who wants to remember to charge them on a regular basis just for an emergent tire change? answer: nobody
Manual tools, and a minimal number of them for the job, are the reliable way to go unless you're in nascar and under a time crunch. Just my 2 cents.

(at home is different. I pull out my cordless impact and floor jack to make quick work of removing wheels!)
 

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I've recently discovered milwaukee battery adapters, so I converted my old craftsman impact to a Milwaukee battery. There is surely adapters for all major makes of tools. Worth it if you have a tool you like but rarely use, like an impact. I also keep a rigid drill in my camper for the leveling jacks, but you would need an impact for a lug nut drills just arent made for that kind of work.

As for battery life, lithium batteries will hold a charge for a very long time, I usually keep mine around 75% charged and top then up when I plan on using them.
 

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I agree that power tools are great but who wants to remember to charge them on a regular basis just for an emergent tire change? answer: nobody
Mine lasted a year and a half of dozens of uses, and being left in the car. I do have the advantage of the 110V outlet to charge it if I am ever in a bind, but, besides never needing to do that, I also have the OEM jack and tire iron, which stays in their storage space. There's not much else that will clip into those spaces, so, it's my last resort backup.

I've changed so many different tires (not mine), that, I'd suspect a decent power tool will last a very very long time for normal people. I figure, charging it on the same cycle as replacing the keyfob batteries would mean never having a dead battery.
 

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i hope gears in Subaru spare tire winch is better compare to Ford and Land-rover , i have seen many many winches stripped gears after using Impact Wrench

also RYOBI at home depot on sale right now , full kit for a price of a tool (item #302648209 Model# P1833 ) $139
18-Volt ONE+ Lithium-Ion Cordless 3-Speed 1/2 in. Impact Wrench Kit with (1) 4.0 Ah Battery, 18-Volt Charger, and Bag

and add
and 307627867 Model# P737D $25
18-Volt ONE+ Lithium-Ion Cordless High Pressure Inflator with Digital Gauge (Tool-Only)


or #308746324Model # P747 $49
18-Volt ONE+ Dual Function Inflator/Deflator (Tool-Only) good for camping ..

(and yes i am RYOBI fan )
 

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i hope gears in Subaru spare tire winch is better compare to Ford and Land-rover , i have seen many many winches stripped gears after using Impact Wrench
So far so good.

also RYOBI at home depot on sale right now , full kit for a price of a tool (item #302648209 Model# P1833 ) $139
18-Volt ONE+ Lithium-Ion Cordless 3-Speed 1/2 in. Impact Wrench Kit with (1) 4.0 Ah Battery, 18-Volt Charger, and Bag

and add
and 307627867 Model# P737D $25
18-Volt ONE+ Lithium-Ion Cordless High Pressure Inflator with Digital Gauge (Tool-Only)


or #308746324Model # P747 $49
18-Volt ONE+ Dual Function Inflator/Deflator (Tool-Only) good for camping ..

(and yes i am RYOBI fan )

I am baffled by their sales. I love them, but, they still baffle me. "Here's this kit we're selling for $40 less than one of the exact same single items!!!"
 

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I am baffled by their sales. I love them, but, they still baffle me. "Here's this kit we're selling for $40 less than one of the exact same single items!!!"
same here ... its why i end up with 12+ Battery by now most came free with a tool on sale ..
also they call it 18-Volt system but from the time they switch to Lithium it actually 19.2-19.8 and new HP models are 20-20.6V
 

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You do have to pay attention to the model numbers on the tools themselves. I noticed a huge price discrepancy in the rigid and Milwaukee tools between different kits. It took me a while to figure out the cheaper kits while visually almost identical, were still brushed and had lower torque specs. Right now I'm sticking with m18 fuel models unless I find something really cool for a great deal. Then I can order a battery adapter to keep my same platform.

In my camper storage compartment I also keep a set of sockets, some self sealing electrical tape patches, screwdrivers, silicone, eternabond tape and some spare fuses for my trailer wiring. In the ascent, sadly I keep no tools. They are all in my legacy, but now that I am thinking of it, I better get my breaker bar and socket set in case of a flat.
 

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You do have to pay attention to the model numbers on the tools themselves. I noticed a huge price discrepancy in the rigid and Milwaukee tools between different kits. It took me a while to figure out the cheaper kits while visually almost identical, were still brushed and had lower torque specs.
Excellent advice. I've been doing just that, and found mixed results. My impact gun and battery ($99 special sale) for instance, is identical to the impact gun, sans battery ($129).

I avoided another kit (jig saw) because it came with the lower quality older model.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
really good input and comments for tools & gear to have in-case-of-need. I have a few items on hand, and have ordered a few that have been suggested and it all makes me feel more confident or at least prepared if the moment arrives.

and I agree re: the great sale prices for a set / kit full of stuff. The model(s) included are usually lesser than what you hope for. I've learned to take a moment before buying and channel my grandfather's advice, 'pay the price and always buy good quality items'

...and if it happens to be on Sale, that's a Win!
 
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Power tools are nice but you have to make sure they're charged.
I agree that power tools are great but who wants to remember to charge them on a regular basis just for an emergent tire change? answer: nobody
^ These are tremendously important pieces of advice.

If you're going to carry emergency-use tools, be sure you know how to use them.

If they're rechargeable, be sure that you test charge status routinely.

Otherwise, you're literally carrying nothing more than an amulet: that's not peace-of-mind, it's just false hope - and hope is never a good plan. It's akin to having that spare tire, but letting its condition deteriorate......

OK, well, maybe amulets work, but you've still gotta know the appropriate prayer to go along with it! :D


OK, back to being serious ---->

Modern rechargeables are very, very reliable and maintain a good amount of their charge over time: and this even extends to bargain-priced items as both @RubinMarin, and @Robert.Mauro pointed out. Rapid self-discharge is now pretty much a thing of the past, but parasitic drain and faulty switching are still things that can happen, even with high-end tools/devices. Luckily, problems like this usually present themselves sooner rather than later, so for those who regularly use their tools, you'll likely notice the issue the first few times you use it, if not right-away. But for those who buy the tool, charge-up, and then stow/store away, this kind of problem can lead to that very "amulet" kind of false-security.....or at least some disappointment when the item is first used.

Carrying an onboard charging method can mitigate a lot of this risk, but as @packout noted, waiting for the charge-up may be anything from inconvenient to non-viable. Plan accordingly.

Overall, heat and cold are both enemies of every and all commonly used batteries, and modern rechargeables still offer no exceptions here. Since the typical road-vehicle is often exposed to at least one of these extremes yearly (and adventuring vehicles often see both ends), a bit of extra care here is worth the effort, too.

As someone who routinely use both primary cells as well as rechargeables for "serious" needs ;) , I've found that a little discipline goes a long way towards making sure that these devices will perform for you when you need them to. :)


----


Throw some lithium AAAs in there as additional insurance. :)
 

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For how infrequently I've had to change a flat, I'm happy to rely on manual tools. Gotta lower the spare enough to check pressure periodically, but I don't find it onerous.
 

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I do not carry a key chain but have found the Olight i1R- EOS kit very useful. It can be recharged through micro usb so you need not worry about dead batteries left in the vehicle. For critical supplies I believe in redundancy so I have multiple flashlight options in the vehicle (headlamp, jumper cables and jump starter - which also can recharge rechargeable batteries and power cell phones, water, food, clothing, em medical, shelter, printed maps, etc.). This flashlight is so small I typically just carry it in my pocket. When I go backcountry with or without vehicle I also carry another cell phone using a different carrier than my primary phone. Trust me I have had to rely on both cell carriers depending on my location.

Olight makes incredible products.
 
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