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If you chose a "Tire & Wheel" package from Discount Tire with TPMS included, what sensors does DiscountTire use? Are they clonable to the existing OEM sensors?
 

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I just has a TPMS sensor go out in my FXT and I let DT replace it. Their sensors are not OEM, but they’re much cheaper then OEM. Like $58/ea vs $115.
TPMS system was fine after that. DT shearing 3 wheel studs clean off was not fine. Turned into an entire day ordeal.
 

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I just has a TPMS sensor go out in my FXT and I let DT replace it. Their sensors are not OEM, but they’re much cheaper then OEM. Like $58/ea vs $115.
TPMS system was fine after that. DT shearing 3 wheel studs clean off was not fine. Turned into an entire day ordeal.
Whoa, no reputable tire installer should ever shear off even one stud, never mind three! They should only use powered wrenches to remove wheels, never to install them. Sounds like a massive over-torque occurred repeatedly by the use of a powered wrench. Shearing off three studs with a torque wrench is highly unlikely unless the car was a total rust bucket.

I hope your wheels weren't damaged. The wheel nuts should always be put on manually and then carefully tightened only with a properly set torque wrench. That's tire installation 101.

I had the "opposite" experience once with Pep Boys. I was on a long road trip when I got a bad flat and had to replace all four tires far from home. They under-tightened the wheel nuts and by the time I got home, four were missing, and they were the expensive ones. I had to buy a completely new set because I couldn't find them individually and Pep Boys would not replace them. I'll never do business with them again. You would think that a tire installer would at least be able to properly tighten wheel nuts and would have proper procedures and installer training to do so.

You have to be very careful when using a tire installer. Now I always check the torque myself as soon as I can to ensure they're not over or under torqued.
 

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The 3 studs sheared upon REMOVAL.
And last outfit to do a rotate was the Subaru dealer here. No rust issues in CO here. Very dry.
 

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The 3 studs sheared upon REMOVAL.
And last outfit to do a rotate was the Subaru dealer here. No rust issues in CO here. Very dry.
Well then, that's probably not the fault of the tire dealer. I've never heard of studs shearing off on removal unless there was severe rust, but you said that was not the case. Very unusual.
 

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Man I dont think ive ever seen a tire installer at discount tire or pep boys use a torque wrench whem changing my tires - they just zipped on the lugs. Something to pay attention to though as I plan on getting some new shoes.
 

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There are devices called torque extensions. These are extensions for impact wrenches that are torsion bars that limit the torque applied to the lug nut. Except for being thinner in diameter and usually colored (color indicating torque) they look no different than normal extensions. All the tire shops I've been to have used these. They'd kinda be nuts not to.
 

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I’ve never seen it before either. Subaru’s have a strict 80ft lbs on their lug nuts. Some shops do 90. And it was the same wheel the TPMS sensor went out on. Wondering if there was an impact of some kind. Wheel and tire are fine.. Who knows.
 

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There are devices called torque extensions. These are extensions for impact wrenches that are torsion bars that limit the torque applied to the lug nut. Except for being thinner in diameter and usually colored (color indicating torque) they look no different than normal extensions. All the tire shops I've been to have used these. They'd kinda be nuts not to.
Yep. I use one.

SIA uses settable impact wrenches. I may have drooled a little looking at all their tools.
 

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If you chose a "Tire & Wheel" package from Discount Tire with TPMS included, what sensors does DiscountTire use? Are they clonable to the existing OEM sensors?
Thank you for the opportunity at your business, TheKroko!

We offer both Schrader and HUF IntelliSense programmable TPMS sensors for the Ascent - both of which are cloneable. Your local Discount Tire should have at least one of these sensor options in stock. (y)

If you have any further questions regarding a tire and wheel combo feel free to shoot us PM - we'll make sure you're taken care of!
 

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Man I dont think ive ever seen a tire installer at discount tire or pep boys use a torque wrench whem changing my tires - they just zipped on the lugs. Something to pay attention to though as I plan on getting some new shoes.
My Discount Tire always uses a torque wrench.
 

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Over-torquing wheel nuts can damage your studs and expensive aluminum wheels. Under-torquing can cause your wheels to loosen which can also damage them and possibly cause a severe accident. Uneven-torquing can damage your wheels and rotors. I've had tire dealers do all three.

Wherever you have your tires mounted, before you buy, ask if they use proper torquing equipment and if they know the correct torque setting for your specific vehicle. Walk away if you don't get a proper answer.

If you're a DIY'er, always check the torque setting yourself after you have your tires serviced. So far, the only places I've currently confirmed that correctly set the torque was my local Costco and my Subaru dealer, but unless they follow a strict company policy, your local area may differ.

Decent torque wrenches or digital torque adapters are not necessarily expensive anymore. You can buy one for under $100. Well worth it. You should always periodically check the wheel nuts anyway because they can loosen over time. This should be considered general owner maintenance of any vehicle. Here is a good guide to properly torquing wheel nuts.
 

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I'm not sure WHICH Discount Tire you went to in Colorado (we went to several in Lakewood), but, my wife (2014 Forester) has had to replace one or more studs every time she's either gotten tires replaced, or rotated. They ALWAYS blame Subaru, and send her to some other company to get them replaced. During the same period, I've had both a 2007 Subaru Legacy and a 2013 Volvo S60, and never had stud issues...
 

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Interesting. Well again, they claim they came off while removing the wheel, but who knows. I’ve been working on my Subaru’s (10+) for a couple of decades and have always adhered to the 80ft lb rule with high dollar SnapOn torque wrenches and never had an issue.
All it takes is one time over torquing to bust those crazy soft studs. They’re made with a lot of nickel to combat corrosion. Nickel is super soft metal.

Coulda been a dumb ass kid that didn’t read the specs on his screen for the car.
 

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and have always adhered to the 80ft lb rule with high dollar SnapOn torque wrenches and never had an issue.
Hiya, just be aware that the Ascent has different torque specs.

Subaru Ascent lug nut torque specs from the FSM:
  • 89 lb-ft torque (but ignore this spec - it's factory torque down, not user)
  • As measured on a torque wrench, 88-110 lb-ft torque.
 

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  • 89 lb-ft torque (but ignore this spec - it's factory torque down, not user)
FWIW: 89 lb ft (120Nm, 12kgfm) is what's specified on page 480 in the pdf manual.

It adds the note:

"This torque is equivalent to applying approximately 88 to 110 lbf (40 to 50 kgf) at the end of the wheel nut wrench. If you have tightened the wheel nuts by yourself, have the tightening torque checked at the nearest automotive service facility as soon as possible. For the wheel nut tightening procedure, refer to “Changing a flat tire” FP406."
 

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FWIW: 89 lb ft (120Nm, 12kgfm) is what's specified on page 480 in the pdf manual.

It adds the note:

"This torque is equivalent to applying approximately 88 to 110 lbf (40 to 50 kgf) at the end of the wheel nut wrench. If you have tightened the wheel nuts by yourself, have the tightening torque checked at the nearest automotive service facility as soon as possible. For the wheel nut tightening procedure, refer to “Changing a flat tire” FP406."
Yes, I covered that, and why. A wheel nut wrench with a mechanism to measure the specified torque pretty much is a torque wrench of one sort or another. 😉
As measured on a torque wrench, 88-110 lb-ft torque.
 

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89 ft lbs has been the same on my 2005 XT, 2008 Tribeca and 2010 legacy GT. And now the 2020 tribeca. That is what you need to set the torque wrench to.

Robert, your note above is not correct. The manual says to apply 88-110 lbs at the end of the wrench they supply with the spare - that is it is about a foot long, or slightly less, needed the extra weight to make up the difference.

lbf = pounds of force.

89 ft-lbs is the torque wrench setting.
 

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FWIW, my local Discount Tire says ”the newer Subarus” torque specs are 89ft lbs.
thats good it lines up with the manual. And I would NEVER torque Subaru lug nuts to 110ft lbs.
thats a good way to snap studs.
 
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