Subaru Ascent Forum banner
41 - 60 of 71 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
942 Posts
Could I just use a shotgun? :devil:

You know, I'm really not sure how a Shockwave or a TAC14 is regarded, under Ohio law, but sadly, we can't have loaded long-guns in-vehicle, even with a valid Ohio-CHL.


Pistol-format MSRs are another option, of-course, but (as with the shotgun) I'm loath to even think about how bad that muzzle blast/report would be, even as I'm trying to save myself from, say, drowning in an overturned vehicle. :smile_big:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Yep. Good tips.

I put out a small car fire with the one I used, and I go hiking, camping and on other similar adventures. We also get fire safety and fire extinguisher training twice a year at my work and I've helped coordinate extinguisher replacements for our habitable areas and server room, including replacing the halon ones no longer legal in our area.
Exactly my point, every fire starts small. Be it electrical fire on the engine, or a camp fire that goes wrong. If you have the extinguisher handy, a couple of puffs is all it takes and the event is completely forgettable. If you don't, the fire can consume your whole car, or if it's a camp fire, thousands of acres.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
942 Posts
I keep my spell book to enlarge my storage area so I can keep my entire house in there!:smile_big:


Cargo Room: Infinity!!!!


-------

My list -

There's always quite a bit of water and "non-perishable" snacks in the vehicle (yes, I count years-old McDonald's fries in this category!) simply because I still have a decently young kiddo. I can see this being less and less of a thing as my child is now an early teen, but truth-be-told, I kinda like having access to some of this stuff rather easily/quickly, particularly if I'm either leaving work late or getting there early. There's easily enough water to last three people in the car for a full day, based on this alone.

But our typical commute is all in the city and inner-ring suburbs, on local streets that are populated with many commercial, residential, and municipal buildings, so in all honesty, this is worst of the worst-possible case kind of stuff. I've had an acquaintance from another online community whose wife got trapped for about 10 hours in the 2011 Chicago snowstorm, and this taught me some lessons, even for someone who commutes as short of a hop as we do.

Each of our Subarus has a wool blanket simply for comfort, and this doubles as good common-sense safety/emergency items, year-round. In the winter, I've got a well-insulated parka whose pockets are stuffed with extra gloves, extra headwear, a scarf, and traction cleats for my boots in the trunk, along with a pair of insulated boots (I'm a benchtop scientist spoiled with underground parking near my lab, so I don't necessarily wear boots, even when there's snow on the ground or in the forecast). The wifey is always bundled up, as her job often requires that she trek outside from one of her clinics to another. A snow-shovel and a longer snow-brush complete the winter kits in each vehicle.

Also in-cabin, each vehicle has a small 1xCR123 LED flashlight. As @Soca noted earlier (https://www.ascentforums.com/forum/...rgency-supplies-do-you-carry-2.html#post88203), even modern rechargeables have a limit as to their temperature range (hot as well as cold) and self-discharge. Using lithium primaries like the CR123A means that, barring significant use, I can simply have good peace-of-mind switching the batteries once every three years, coinciding with our lease turn-over. As a nerdy flashlight collector, I already buy CR123s by the case, so the expense is really not much of an issue. :nerd: Each car has a small fire-extinguisher: as several others have noted, this is simply to buy what little time is needed to safely get out of the vehicle (or to do the same for someone else, if-necessary). Its intended use is only in extremis - I've been eyewitness to two vehicle-fires in my life, now, and I know just how fast they can progress: I'm under no illusion whatsoever that their presence is about somehow saving my vehicle.

A small "boo-boo" kit with the usual creams, ointments, OTC pain relief and assorted Band-Aids can also be found in-cabin, and this is kept well-separated from the major bleed kit (Combat Gauze, SWAT-T [because this works for the doggo, too; I always carry a CAT as a primary, and I also always carry the typical shooting-sports "blow-out kit" on my body: in-reality, this gives me access to at least three tourniquets and two packs of Combat Gauze at any time, plus chest seals...realistically, this is all that I can do, but in the wife's car - and I'll fish this out and into my car when we road-trip - there's a very small field-surgery kit, too], duct-tape).

Seat-belt cutters for each passenger.

A pack of fuses along with a fuse tool, some electrical tape and 3M Automotive Trim/Molding Tape rounds out the in-vehicle stuff.

The trunk is where most of the stuff goes. For the Ascent, I was actually pleasantly surprised by that little hold under the floor panel. For my wife's WRX, I pull the foam liner between the trunk panel and the spare, and use the space as-is.


Each car has the following:



  • spare glasses for the primary driver of the vehicle
  • GoGirl, wet-wipes, toilet paper, maxi pads (I live with two women! :angel: The aforementioned acquaintance whose wife was trapped on her daily 20-minute commute Chicago freeway trip - she was fully prepped because her spouse is like a lot of us here in this thread, and prepped her vehicle...which she thought was just crazy - up until the very moment she got stranded with her fellow motorists. The only thing she wished she would have had was some way of urinating without making a mess, so, lesson learned.)
  • large and small trash bags
  • jumper cable
  • duct tape
  • basic tools: screwdriver with bits, pliers (I always have a multi-tool on my person)
  • breaker bar with 19mm deep socket
  • shock cords
  • heat-insulated gloves
  • 1 quart motor oil
  • 1 quart Subaru "blue" Super Coolant
  • 1 quart windshield washer fluid
  • 2x16 oz. bottles of drinking water
  • 6-pack of road flares
  • Two 2xCR123 flashlights, with 2 pairs of extra batteries in a battery case
  • road atlas
  • LifeStraw
  • fixed blade "survival knife" (it's more a sharpened crowbar, I'm not looking for Rambo action, rather, this is a robust cutting tool that can double as a second pry-bar) and a robust folding knife
  • compact "survival kit" with BlastMatch, WetFire tinder, JetScream whistle, signaling mirror, and cable-saw (the last two I really could care less about, but the first three in a pre-packaged format made it worth the cost)
  • a good butane lighter
  • ARK kit
  • mylar survival blankets
  • ponchos
  • three days' worth of dog food
  • water dish for the dog
  • extra dog leash and collar
  • poop bags
All of the above fits under the floor of the trunk, so there's no lost space. :)

For road-trips, I'll put in a small box of supplementals, plus a case of drinking water. If it's winter time, extra water-resistant outerwear and footwear for everyone.

  • another pouch of 6 road flares
  • LED road flares
  • two more ARKs
  • freshly charged jump pack
  • chemical hand warmers
The case of drinking water takes up the most room, but I also use it as consumables during the trip. The supplemental kit really takes up very, very little space at all, and typically ends up occupying dead-space that's unable to fit luggage, anyway. True, the WRX's trunk does get a little tight with all of that, but we rarely use my wife's vehicle for road-trips any more, given the little girl and the dog. But when it's just the two of us, the winter kit (er...cardboard box :smile_big:) I put in her car to hold the shovel, snow-brush, and blanket can easily be stuffed with our extra winter items.

There's always a little cash in each vehicle, too. Nothing outrageous, just a twenty, a ten, and a five. The coin trays are always fully stacked, too, so that's enough for everything from paying for a bit of gas to parking to tipping the valet (and if the valet should steal whatever cash is in the vehicle, so what, it really ain't much).

We're really pretty lucky in that our prescription medication list is pretty slim, and it's all "non-perishable."

In reading through this thread and seeing what other members have, what I'd like to add are:

  • radio/comms (needs research, but I have a buddy who is big into this category) and/or emergency GPS locator
  • solar backup
  • winter traction aids (needs research)
  • tire repair kit with compressor
  • AED (needs research)
  • vehicle-mounted "blow-out kit" (mainly to increase my bleed-control capabilities, given the number of seats in this vehicle, I think that this may not be a bad idea - I really like Dark Angel's HEDR, but I wouldn't mount mine on the headrests: Headrest Emergency Deployment Rig (HEDR) Trauma Kit)
  • vacuum packing the additional winter wear
  • vise-grips
  • kinetic recovery straps
  • reflective safety vests
And as more than one member already wrote, KNOW HOW TO USE WHAT YOU HAVE.

This goes for everything from a portable jump-starter to a tourniquet (remember, use a dedicated trainer tourniquet for training!) to a handgun to a traction aid. If you don't know how to use it, you're only carrying what you're carrying as an amulet, nothing more.

When you have an emergency, it shouldn't be the first time you've tried to use what you have - and you shouldn't have to think about whether you may or may not have what you need/want, and where that item may or may not be located in our rather cavernous vehicles. :tango_face_wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Rechargeable lithium 18650s don’t really do well in high temps for long term. Which is why all my flashlights are either CR123, envelop AA, or energizer lithium AA. Low self discharge, more tolerant of temp extremes.

What I’ll be doing is getting a better battery as I’ve seen the OEM dip below 12volts after sitting a few days. That thing will leave me stranded for sure.

Want to see if I can go slightly bigger without modifying any mounts/straps, etc

I’d purchase a lithium jump starter for trips or cool weather storage only.

I’d imagine a traditional jumper with a lead acid AGM would do better in hot temps at 4-6x the size and weight
I've never had one do that and haven't seen it mentioned online before. I've had one for about 5 years. It's in the back cargo area in the original box/carrying case and I also have the optional cargo cover.
@Soca : I've looked at the lead acid packs at Costco, and didn't like the weight/bulk plus the hassle of dragging it around for recharging. I'll be carrying a NOCO GB70 on longer trips away from home, but not full time in the car. The instructions that come with it seem to suggest that it should be stored at room temperature; I'd be OK with leaving it in the car in an airport parking garage, out of direct sunlight, for a few days, but not out in the open.


A jumper pack using single use lithium batteries (not li-ion) would not have these issues but there aren't any made that I know of.



My main insurance is to make the battery a regular replacement item. I get a good quality battery from a trusted supplier (in my case an independent shop with a longtime good reputation) and just replace it every 3 years or so whether it needs it or not. :grin:. A battery can poop out from one day to the next and IME the likelihood goes up greatly after 3 years or so (no matter how long the so-called warranty is). I'm happy to preemptively change it out. Goes w/o saying that jumper cables should always be in the trunk.



@kathyn: if you mean one of the small li-ion jumpers, small enough to fit in a man's pants pocket, that can be bought for 50 or 60 bucks, I carried one of those in the car too without incident, and then found that it would not budge an old H-6 Sube with a flat battery. It was the larger replacement for that small jumper that then split in storage in the trunk of another car, after a couple of months in the summer. That got me thinking about how big a jumper pack might really be needed to start a car with a dead battery, and the wisdom of storing li-ion jumpers on board.



YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
611 Posts
@Soca : I've looked at the lead acid packs at Costco, and didn't like the weight/bulk plus the hassle of dragging it around for recharging. I'll be carrying a NOCO GB70 on longer trips away from home, but not full time in the car. The instructions that come with it seem to suggest that it should be stored at room temperature; I'd be OK with leaving it in the car in an airport parking garage, out of direct sunlight, for a few days, but not out in the open.


A jumper pack using single use lithium batteries (not li-ion) would not have these issues but there aren't any made that I know of.



My main insurance is to make the battery a regular replacement item. I get a good quality battery from a trusted supplier (in my case an independent shop with a longtime good reputation) and just replace it every 3 years or so whether it needs it or not. :grin:. A battery can poop out from one day to the next and IME the likelihood goes up greatly after 3 years or so (no matter how long the so-called warranty is). I'm happy to preemptively change it out. Goes w/o saying that jumper cables should always be in the trunk.



@kathyn: if you mean one of the small li-ion jumpers, small enough to fit in a man's pants pocket, that can be bought for 50 or 60 bucks, I carried one of those in the car too without incident, and then found that it would not budge an old H-6 Sube with a flat battery. It was the larger replacement for that small jumper that then split in storage in the trunk of another car, after a couple of months in the summer. That got me thinking about how big a jumper pack might really be needed to start a car with a dead battery, and the wisdom of storing li-ion jumpers on board.



YMMV.

Mines probably about the size of Hershey chocolate bars (the $1.00 ones, not the cheaper ones)
stacked 3-4 high. It's good for 5 diesel semi truck jumps and I think it said 20 car jumps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
978 Posts
After dealing with a flat tire this weekend i realized i have no supplies or tools in the car other than the jack and wrench for putting a spare on. Was wondering what are the basics I should have? Do you have flares, extra tools, compressor, battery, gloves, etc with you always? And if you gear up a lot how do u keep it all organized and neatly stowed?

Thanks,
Depends on the trip and time of yr. Local
Stuff just my mini Quake kit, water, flashlight, power bars, small cheap satchel to carry stuff, basic first aid kit etc. Wifes kit is the same but she has shoes, as in old running shoes given walking anywhere in her work shoes aint happening.

Trips I pack tire plugs and small compressor, tow strap, mini jumper box. I have a small chunk of 4x6 in that bin for the jack if added height is needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
I really think it is important for folks to have an emergency kit in their cars for the unexpected events that they might encounter. After reviewing all the gear listed in these posts, here is the emergency kit I have put together for my Ascent and my wife's daily commute in her Outback. Keep in mind we live in the mountains of Southern California with the possibilities of being trapped on a mountain road by rock slides, snow avalanches and "The Big One" earthquake. My larger kit fits nicely in an average size duffel bag and in the storage compartment. Things I would need easy access to like flares, first aid, etc. are in the duffel and things like the shovel and recovery strap are in the compartment that might require unloading stuff to get access to. We both also carry tire traction devices (Auto Socks) year round. The Ascent gets more gear because I am likely to use tools, etc. and because this is the vehicle we now take on our Subaru Get Out There Adventures!!

Emergency Kits For Vehicles

Ascent
Outfitted for 2 Person Adventures

1. Fire Extinguisher
2. First Aid Kit (Large, Trauma)
3. Survival Kit
4. Emergency Blanket (Heavy Duty)(2)
5. Flashlights With Batteries
6. Flashlights – USB
7. Whistle
8. Battery Charger Pack
9. Toilet Paper
10. Bandanas (2)
11. Paracord (50’)
12. Snack Pack (Granola and Cliff Bars)
13. Matches
14. Poncho (2)
15. Glo-Sticks
16. Exam Gloves (4 pair)
17. Leather Work Gloves (lrg & xlrg)
18. Fleece Blanket (Twin Size)(2)
19. Swiss Army Knife With Saw
20. Towel
21. Hand, Foot and Body Warmers (2 sets)
22. Jacket
23. Duct Tape
24. Cash
25. LED Flares (2)
26. Collpsable Shovel
27. Ground Cover (7x9)
28. D-Ring Shackle w/Receiver Insert
29. D-Ring Shackle for Recovery Strap
30. Recovery Strap
31. Reflective Vest (2)
32. Porta Pee Bags
33. Driver Set With Bits & Sockets
34. Vice Grips
35. Shrink Wrap
36. X-tra Keys (Racks, Hitch, House, Trailer)
37. Seatbelt Cutter (2)
38. Traction Boards
39. Air Compressor
40. Tire Plug Kit
41. Water Bottles in all cup holders (Not During Winter)
42. Life Straw Water Filter 

Outback
Outfitted for 1 Person Daily Commutes

1. Fire Extinguisher
2. First Aid Kit (Small Trauma)
3. Survival Kit
4. Emergency Blanket (Heavy Duty)
5. Flashlights With Batteries
6. Flashlights – USB
7. Whistle
8. Battery Charger Pack
9. Toilet Paper
10. Bandanas (2)
11. Paracord (50’)
12. Snack Pack (Granola and Cliff Bars)
13. Matches
14. Poncho
15. Glo-Sticks
16. Exam Gloves (2 pair)
17. Leather Work Gloves
18. Extra Clothes/Shoes/Jacket
19. Fleece Blanket/Throw
20. Swiss Army Knife
21. Towel
22. Hand, Foot and Body Warmers
23. Jacket
24. Duct Tape
25. Cash
26. LED Flares (2)
27. Reflective Vest
28. Porta Pee Bags
29. Shrink Wrap
30. X-tra Keys (Racks, Hitch, House, Trailer)
31. Seatbelt Cutter
32. Water Bottles in all cup holders (Not During Winter)
33. Life Straw Water Filter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
942 Posts
If you find that your purchased plastic bottles of water pass a freeze test in your freezer, you'll be able to have them resident in-car with no worries. ;)

On the flip side, if it gets hot where you are, you'll want to change out that duct-tape (as well as any other adhesive-backed products) after a couple of years.

Be sure to have good batteries - I use lithium primaries - in your LED flares.


-----


I really like your idea of keeping the items bagged. I'm going to have to punt around a few ideas towards that end. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Great Ideas TSiWRX

Putting a water bottle in the freezer now.:smile:
I did swap all of the batteries in the kit for lithium. I also take them out of the device and keep them with it in a baggie or taped to it so they don't do that corrosion/leak thing. Using the cheapo batteries in the flameless candles around the living room.
I put the duct tape in a ziplock bag to keep the adhesive from getting on other things. They do get rather difficult to use after a couple of years in a car!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
Putting a water bottle in the freezer now.

I did swap all of the batteries in the kit for lithium. I also take them out of the device and keep them with it in a baggie or taped to it so they don't do that corrosion/leak thing. Using the cheapo batteries in the flameless candles around the living room.
I put the duct tape in a ziplock bag to keep the adhesive from getting on other things. They do get rather difficult to use after a couple of years in a car!
In my experience lithium’s and eneloops do not leak like alkaline. As long as there isn’t a parasitic draw you should be good.
 

·
Registered
2019 Ascent Limited, 2015 WRX, 2022 OB Onyx
Joined
·
4,436 Posts
After dealing with a flat tire this weekend i realized i have no supplies or tools in the car other than the jack and wrench for putting a spare on. Was wondering what are the basics I should have? Do you have flares, extra tools, compressor, battery, gloves, etc with you always? And if you gear up a lot how do u keep it all organized and neatly stowed?

Thanks,
Add to the great lists already created: Rescue Tape - https://www.amazon.com/Rescue-Tape/dp/B01IZVHZJY
 

·
Registered
2019 Ascent Limited, 2015 WRX, 2022 OB Onyx
Joined
·
4,436 Posts
Great Ideas TSiWRX

Putting a water bottle in the freezer now.?
I did swap all of the batteries in the kit for lithium. I also take them out of the device and keep them with it in a baggie or taped to it so they don't do that corrosion/leak thing. Using the cheapo batteries in the flameless candles around the living room.
I put the duct tape in a ziplock bag to keep the adhesive from getting on other things. They do get rather difficult to use after a couple of years in a car!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,408 Posts
It may seem like overkill, but I always have one of these with me:

1719

ACR ResQLink 400 - Buoyant GPS Personal Locator Beacon (Model: PLB-400)

With one of these, you simply press a button and you will be rescued virtually anywhere on land or water wherever you roam, even in areas where no cell signals exist. It has global coverage via Cospas-Sarsat / MEOSAR satellites. You could be in the remotest parts of the Earth and they can find you.

Other than the modest cost of purchasing this unit, no other costs are involved. You simply register the unit online so they know who it belongs to, and if you ever get into trouble, this unit will assure your rescue where no other device can.

I purchased one because I sail in large bodies of water and mountain bike into areas which are very remote and where cell signals don't reach. If you ever watch the cell signal strength of your smartphone when you travel, you'll often notice that you easily can be in an area of no cell coverage. Fortunately for Ascent owners, we have Starlink, but what about when you wander from your car? If you have one of these with you, you never have to worry.

I also got one for each of my adventurous adult kids who are avid hikers, skiers, and bikers. So worth it not to worry, if you're a parent you'll know what I'm talking about. They easily fit into a backpack, onto a belt, or a flotation device.

They're not cheap (~$300) but what's the price of your or your child's life? These devices have already saved thousands workwide.

More info here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
611 Posts
It may seem like overkill, but I always have one of these with me:

View attachment 1719
ACR ResQLink 400 - Buoyant GPS Personal Locator Beacon (Model: PLB-400)

With one of these, you simply press a button and you will be rescued virtually anywhere on land or water wherever you roam, even in areas where no cell signals exist. It has global coverage via Cospas-Sarsat / MEOSAR satellites. You could be in the remotest parts of the Earth and they can find you.

Other than the modest cost of purchasing this unit, no other costs are involved. You simply register the unit online so they know who it belongs to, and if you ever get into trouble, this unit will assure your rescue where no other device can.

I purchased one because I sail in large bodies of water and mountain bike into areas which are very remote and where cell signals don't reach. If you ever watch the cell signal strength of your smartphone when you travel, you'll often notice that you easily can be in an area of no cell coverage. Fortunately for Ascent owners, we have Starlink, but what about when you wander from your car? If you have one of these with you, you never have to worry.

I also got one for each of my adventurous adult kids who are avid hikers, skiers, and bikers. So worth it not to worry, if you're a parent you'll know what I'm talking about. They easily fit into a backpack, onto a belt, or a flotation device.

They're not cheap (~$300) but what's the price of your or your child's life? These devices have already saved thousands workwide.

More info here.
I bought a similar one about 15 years ago when I had a summer home in WY - off the grid, and no cell signals . Every year I renew the registration with NOAA - for free. You just verify your address/phone, etc. but more importantly, the people that are your emergency contacts.
 
41 - 60 of 71 Posts
Top