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Hi everyone. Two weeks into life with my third Sube, and am I ever in Boxer Wonderland. I love this car. Truly I love the luxury, in that the rest of my fleet is semi-restored Detroit rattletraps assembled when LBJ was Prez. My inquiry to all of you: In that I am a car restorer, I'm keenly aware of the fragility and shelf life of some vehicle components, e.g. rubber parts. Parts drop away from availability, often right when they're needed. For those of us who intend to keep our Ascents many years, what should I buy now while they're around, to replace later? What pops into mind right now are the tailpipe extensions, the rubber seal around the moonroof, and that funky "bug basket" at the moonroof's front. What else?
3972
 

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You'd be amazed as to how much can be 3D printed these days.

Here are some files from just one site.

Around 10 years from now a bunch of parts replacement pieces are going to be printed as needed by your service department.
 

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Based on my 21 year old Lexus RX300, if you're really that worried, every rubber bit under the car will deteriorate. Motor mount dampers, exhaust hangers, brake lines, all the drivetrain boots, shock tower bushings, etc. The only part that I couldn't find for the Lexus wasnt a matter of not finding it as much as not wanting to spend a lot to buy it - the brake fluid level sensor in the master cylinder reservoir cover. So I just disconnected it to shut off the warning light. Are Subarus so rare that there aren't after market suppliers?
 

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Wait 10 years. All the parts will still be available and you can decide if it's a long term keeper and what you might want to stockpile.
 

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In the many decades I've been buying vehicles, I've never even considered any kind of stockpiling of parts or components. Parts are still available for vehicles that are decades old so I don't believe there's anything to worry about. The money would be better used for other purposes, IMHO. So aside from maybe having normal periodic maintenance parts available for the next interval if you choose to do the service yourself...I can't think of anything at all that would be worth acquiring now for use a decade or more in the future.
 

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I would not bother purchasing consumable parts in advance, because no matter how much you are in love with your boxer now, things change. Your life could be completely different in ten years, your car could be in an accident in ten years, or you might want something else that Subaru sells in ten years (to end on a positive note).
 

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In the many decades I've been buying vehicles, I've never even considered any kind of stockpiling of parts or components. Parts are still available for vehicles that are decades old so I don't believe there's anything to worry about. The money would be better used for other purposes, IMHO. So aside from maybe having normal periodic maintenance parts available for the next interval if you choose to do the service yourself...I can't think of anything at all that would be worth acquiring now for use a decade or more in the future.
The only parts that I have ever purchased/stockpiled in advance are crush washers for oil drains, manual transmissions and differentials. The generic auto parts stores haven't always had the right specs and it was easy to buy in advance from the brand's online dealers. Might do this for the Ascent if I decide to service the fluids myself.
 

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Since the 2021 shares a lot (almost all) of the same parts as the 2019 and 2020, we'll have full parts availability for at least 11 years. So, I'd choose non-perishable items that are expected to go up in price beyond the cost (whether physical or monetary) of storing them for 11 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, I’ll try to not worry about it then. You’ve all got to know though that for the kind of vehicles I’ve spent my life with, the hunt for NOS parts requires strong hunter gatherer instincts and deep pockets. I was thinking this car was going to be more of the same. Maybe not.
 

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I'd also take into account modern global platforms for manufacturers means these parts are in multiple vehicles.
 

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Since the 2021 shares a lot (almost all) of the same parts as the 2019 and 2020, we'll have full parts availability for at least 11 years. So, I'd choose non-perishable items that are expected to go up in price beyond the cost (whether physical or monetary) of storing them for 11 years.
To this point, with proper maintenance, and no wrecks, modern cars should be able to get to 250K miles whereas the OP is used to stuff that was celebrated when it made it to 100K.
 

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To this point, with proper maintenance, and no wrecks, modern cars should be able to get to 250K miles whereas the OP is used to stuff that was celebrated when it made it to 100K.
Might be the case for a naturally aspirated vehicle, but that turbo is probably not going to last for 250K miles.
 

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Might be the case for a naturally aspirated vehicle, but that turbo is probably not going to last for 250K miles.
I'm curious about that too. But so far, I haven't seen BMW or Mercedes owners complaining about needing to rebuild or replace their turbos.
 

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Might be the case for a naturally aspirated vehicle, but that turbo is probably not going to last for 250K miles.
I'm curious about that too. But so far, I haven't seen BMW or Mercedes owners complaining about needing to rebuild or replace their turbos.
F150s with the EcoBoost is likely the biggest test of turbos and plenty of the 2011s(first year) are over 200K without any turbo issues.

Judging modern turbos by earlier turbos is like judging today's diesels by GM's '80s diesels debacle.

EDIT- A quick look at Autotrader and I see there are a few EcoBoosts already over 300K miles.
 

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F150s with the EcoBoost is likely the biggest test and plenty of the 2011s(first year) are over 200K without any turbo issues.

Judging modern turbos by earlier turbos is like judging today's diesels by GM's '80s diesels debacle.

EDIT- A quick look at Autotrader and I see there are a few EcoBoosts already over 300K miles.
I never knew which Fords used the MGT22. That's impressive to know. I guess I'd been driving in an MGT22 boosted car from well before the Ascent then...

This F150 EcoBoost died when it was hit head on by someone who ran a light... and thus my Ascent took over towing duties for my best friend's trailer...

...but until then, it was a solid pickup.

4005
 

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F150s with the EcoBoost is likely the biggest test of turbos and plenty of the 2011s(first year) are over 200K without any turbo issues.

Judging modern turbos by earlier turbos is like judging today's diesels by GM's '80s diesels debacle.

EDIT- A quick look at Autotrader and I see there are a few EcoBoosts already over 300K miles.
I sincerely hope the Ascent turbo runs that long, but that engine is a bit smaller than the one used in those Fords.
 

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every once in a while I see our oil filters go on sale on amazon so it might be worth picking up a handful of those at a good price.
 

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^^^
I had no idea that BMW and Mercedes used the MGT22. I was referring to turbos in general.
Yep, it's a well used turbo with over a decade of use in various applications.

I sincerely hope the Ascent turbo runs that long, but that engine is a bit smaller than the one used in those Fords.
The Ascent barely touches its capabilities. It's more heavily used in the performance oriented BMWs, and in the heavier tow capable F150s - higher boosts, heavier loads, or both.

I expect our MGT22 application is barely efforting in comparison. 😉
 

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I sincerely hope the Ascent turbo runs that long, but that engine is a bit smaller than the one used in those Fords.
The 4 cylinder EcoBoost has been in the Ford Focus for a decade now and there are plenty of them with over 250K on the odometer. You can now find 4 cylinder EcoBoosts in the Fusion, Edge, Explorer, Ranger, and Transit delivery vans as well.
 
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