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2021 Ascent Touring
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My niece and her boyfriend invited us to go driving on the beach near Gearhart on the northern Oregon coast. His car is the Rubicon, the Tahoe is my sister and brother-in-law.
Nothing like a lot of others heee do, but a lot of fun.
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I’ll upload a short video clip later.
 

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2021 Ascent Touring
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nice...how did the Ascent do?
As well as the Jeep, better than the Yukon. I have literally no experience driving on anything "off-road" besides FS/BLM roads and have never intentionally driven in deep, soft sand. The only time I ever felt a little sketchy was when I was on the edge of my own skills, but it had nothing to do with the Ascent's performance.
 

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2018 Subaru Outback Limited 3.6R, 2003 Honda Pilot EX
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As well as the Jeep, better than the Yukon. I have literally no experience driving on anything "off-road" besides FS/BLM roads and have never intentionally driven in deep, soft sand. The only time I ever felt a little sketchy was when I was on the edge of my own skills, but it had nothing to do with the Ascent's performance.
Do you have stock wheels and tires? If so, what size are they?
Did you air down before?

To be quite honest, I had never even thought of airing down until quite recently and had gone down to the beach with both my Impreza and Pilot and never had any issues... was i just lucky? :)
Cute pup!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Do you have stock wheels and tires? If so, what size are they?
Did you air down before?

To be quite honest, I had never even thought of airing down until quite recently and had gone down to the beach with both my Impreza and Pilot and never had any issues... was i just lucky? :)
I do not have stock tires. I have random 18s that I bought from someone on here and they have Falken Wildpeak AT Trails on them (245/60R18). I didn't air down, but that was primarily because the amount of soft sand was pretty minimal and it wasn't really necessary. We did have an air pump with us so could have easily done so. We also had plenty of recovery gear (2 recovery straps rated at 30K#, a kinetic rope, shovels and 2 sets of recovery boards) so I wasn't particularly worried.
Cute pup!
Thanks. That's the only one (of 3) that I could get to sit still in front of the car. We actually had 5 dogs with us on that adventure including my sister's 2 boxers. But her 2 dogs together weigh less than this dude.
 

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2021 Subaru Ascent Limited
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As a fellow PDX Ascent owner I hope to also get it out on the sand for some beach cruising! This is probably a rookie question, but, does the sand change much on the north coast day to day / month to month? I assume weather impacts it, e.g. in our rainy season, but, could it be super soft one day and firm another?
 

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Be a responsible Subie owner and DON'T drive on any beach, its' really bad for the ecosystem (destroys habitat)!
 

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That’s fair, but the same could be said for forest service roads, national scenic highways, etc. I think the things I try to focus on wrt environmental impact
1) drive less - we try to walk or bike during our daily lives and only use the Ascent for adventures (this of course is only possible because we live in an area that supports it)
2) focused impact - try to stay in areas others are using, over use is an issue as well but we try to stay on designated trails, camp in existing areas, and drive in areas that others frequent, limit “trail blazing” / cutting new roads
These decisions probably aren’t the best for the environment but they seem pretty sustainable.
I respect your comment though and wondering if you’ve read any good material about the impact OHV access has on beach environments?
 

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Be a responsible Subie owner and DON'T drive on any beach, its' really bad for the ecosystem (destroys habitat)!
(y)
I've never understood the desire to drive on the beach or to go to a beach where driving is allowed. Daytona, :mad: I've lived at or near the beach my entire life and have personally cleaned tons of trash and removed tar from wildlife.
 

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2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
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(y)
I've never understood the desire to drive on the beach or to go to a beach where driving is allowed. Daytona, :mad: I've lived at or near the beach my entire life and have personally cleaned tons of trash and removed tar from wildlife.
I don't crave it, but really did enjoy exploring Kure Beach NC's a few years ago on vacation. It was really nice to be "not near anyone", enjoying the sun, surf, birds and natural landscape.
 

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I'm not certain if you realize this, but tar sometimes (not always) occurs due to natural seepage.
I lived on the beach for 15 years and near the beach over 50. It also comes from ships blowing the bilge and plenty of ratty cars and their leaking crankcases, differentials, transfer cases etc. The sea turtles have enough challenges without getting mired and poisoned. Driving and parking on the beach are unnecessary. Signing off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
(y)
I've never understood the desire to drive on the beach or to go to a beach where driving is allowed. Daytona, :mad: I've lived at or near the beach my entire life and have personally cleaned tons of trash and removed tar from wildlife.
Neither did I, until I tried it. It was fun. And no more destructive than any other OHV driving that we (or anyone else) does.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
As a fellow PDX Ascent owner I hope to also get it out on the sand for some beach cruising! This is probably a rookie question, but, does the sand change much on the north coast day to day / month to month? I assume weather impacts it, e.g. in our rainy season, but, could it be super soft one day and firm another?
I thought that I'd replied to this, but apparently I didn't.

The sand on the North coast is far more affected by tides than anything else. It's pretty flat in the Gearhart area so the tides come far in and out so there's not a lot of soft sand.

The only other area where beach driving is allowed in OR is the South coast near Florence, where there are large sand dunes and much more soft sand than in the north. I suspect that this is much more impacted by weather, vs. tides, than further north, but I haven't tried it down there yet.
 

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Be a responsible Subie owner and DON'T drive on any beach, its' really bad for the ecosystem (destroys habitat)!
Near me, there's designated areas, and quite high fines for those who decide to deviate. The areas people are allowed to drive are the same areas people would normally be allowed to sunbathe, water ski, drag their beach carts on, etc. they even codified proper beach 4x4 use into law (9 N.Y.C.R.R. 372.1 - 372.6;415.4) so that it's quite very enforceable.

If other habitats or protected species are found, they've been known to close other sections as well. And, they're very serious about it. For instance, one can't even walk into the Piping Plover area, much less drive.


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I lived on the beach for 15 years and near the beach over 50. It also comes from ships blowing the bilge and plenty of ratty cars and their leaking crankcases, differentials, transfer cases etc. The sea turtles have enough challenges without getting mired and poisoned. Driving and parking on the beach are unnecessary. Signing off.
Believe me, friend, I live in Southern California, where a trip to the beach from Los Angeles north to Santa Barbara requires tar-wipes. I lived half a decade on the beach in Ventucky, and I am acutely aware of the scenarios behind what caused tar to bubble up and make their way on your feet.
 

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I lived on the beach for 15 years and near the beach over 50. It also comes from ships blowing the bilge and plenty of ratty cars and their leaking crankcases, differentials, transfer cases etc. The sea turtles have enough challenges without getting mired and poisoned. Driving and parking on the beach are unnecessary. Signing off.
Sadly, our marine life has more challenges from our garbage and poisons we drop into the ocean off shore, which then washes back up on the beach - along with millions of people and their garbage, followed by the beach combers picking up the garbage. Heck, Robert Moses and Jones Beach alone, see 10 million people a year. The designated 4x4 areas are pristine in comparison, especially with today's newer cars that don't leak regularly like old school cars.

We also highly limit beach traffic, and beach traffic areas. We have over 250 miles of beach (400 miles if you count the Great South Bay beaches), of which, the state has designated only 15-20 miles for a limited number of 4x4's/AWDs, and Suffolk County has designated another 25.
 

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I am acutely aware of the scenarios behind what caused tar to bubble up and make their way on your feet.
That's certainly true for California but not Florida. I have relatives in the LA area who have had active oil wells on their properties for decades.

I was walked the beach after dark to rake out tire ruts that would trap the hatchlings. Also carried a GPS to record the location of spills for cleanup. The red trans fluid, smelly gear oil and green antifreeze didn't get there naturally.
 

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That’s fair, but the same could be said for forest service roads, national scenic highways, etc. I think the things I try to focus on wrt environmental impact
1) drive less - we try to walk or bike during our daily lives and only use the Ascent for adventures (this of course is only possible because we live in an area that supports it)
2) focused impact - try to stay in areas others are using, over use is an issue as well but we try to stay on designated trails, camp in existing areas, and drive in areas that others frequent, limit “trail blazing” / cutting new roads
These decisions probably aren’t the best for the environment but they seem pretty sustainable.
I respect your comment though and wondering if you’ve read any good material about the impact OHV access has on beach environments?
Driving on established roads are not the same at all! Granted there's destruction of habitat when they are built but it's not the same at all as driving on a beach! Even if the beach has an "established" roadbed, vehicles drip oil, not everyone stays in the path and softer sand will ultimately get compressed.... Your #2 bullet is pretty right on. What does OHV stand for?
 

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Off Highway Vehicle?

I’m not sure what you mean by established roads, but if you never take your Subaru off pavement the best I can say is you’re missing out. I feel that it can be done responsibly and sustainably. If a forest service road or OHV area falls into your “established road” definition, then be it sand, gravel or dirt it seems like splitting hairs saying it’s fine to drive on an unimproved road in the forest but not one on the beach.
It’s clear that vehicles are bad for flora and fauna but with proper regulations (like what Robert posted above) everyone/thing can have their space.
 
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