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We were on a back woods logging road in NW Maine this last weekend. We flushed a hawk from a tree who flew right down on the road in front of us, at about the driver's head height. We were doing about 25-30 mph and I hit the brakes and the bird was still getting closer so I hit them harder, bringing us to a crawl. At that point the bird made it safely away.

No beeps, no braking, nothing, from Eyesight. I would have figured at least a beep would have happened. Admittedly it was a pretty unusual situation but I think that Eyesight would have notice something weird going on. It's not often you have a big bird above your front bumper, the stereo vision would have given a clear range to it.

Maybe that's it? It was so close the car was thinking, meh, why bother, the driver is already braking, I can't help out anymore...
 

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Eyesight can only react to what it’s programmed to react to. It can recognize people to an extent but a bird would be much more difficult to get a fix on.
Try doing the same thing with a Tesla? I’m genuinely curious if it would react!
 

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If you have reacted in a manner that the system thinks is sufficient to mitigate an accident, it won't do anything, or it will cease doing whatever it was doing.
 

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Eyesight can only react to what it’s programmed to react to. It can recognize people to an extent but a bird would be much more difficult to get a fix on.
I guess I wasn't as clear as I could have been. I actually do have some minor experience with machine learning and vision systems. Systems, such as Eyesight, are not actually programmed, instead, they are taught. Think about the last time you were asked to click on the squares on a website, identifying traffic lights or buses or taxis. Your input is used to help train google's machine learning algorithms. Subaru almost certainly has done a similar thing, not with website clicks, but with real world data. And of course that real world data did not include a bird above the bumper. But..., the system could have know that something weird was going on and at least beeped. I was surprised that it didn't.
 

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I guess I wasn't as clear as I could have been. I actually do have some minor experience with machine learning and vision systems. Systems, such as Eyesight, are not actually programmed, instead, they are taught. Think about the last time you were asked to click on the squares on a website, identifying traffic lights or buses or taxis. Your input is used to help train google's machine learning algorithms. Subaru almost certainly has done a similar thing, not with website clicks, but with real world data. And of course that real world data did not include a bird above the bumper. But..., the system could have know that something weird was going on and at least beeped. I was surprised that it didn't.
Well, yes, but not like that, really. It would use stereoscopic 3D point swarm plotting and mapping, trajectory calculations, vehicle speed, inertia and braking calculations, and a few other things to determine the likelihood of an impact. It then waits until a variable threshold is crossed before warning. User action changes the threshold variability by changing the other parameters I mentioned above.

Additionally, it can detect and identify certain types of objects.
 

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Ahhh, that makes sense. Why beep when I'm already braking?
Exactly. It will increase braking if it thinks you're not braking hard enough, but, to be honest, I'm not sure if it beeps at the same time.

Hmmmm...
 

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We were on a back woods logging road in NW Maine this last weekend. We flushed a hawk from a tree who flew right down on the road in front of us, at about the driver's head height. We were doing about 25-30 mph and I hit the brakes and the bird was still getting closer so I hit them harder, bringing us to a crawl. At that point the bird made it safely away.

No beeps, no braking, nothing, from Eyesight. I would have figured at least a beep would have happened. Admittedly it was a pretty unusual situation but I think that Eyesight would have notice something weird going on. It's not often you have a big bird above your front bumper, the stereo vision would have given a clear range to it.

Maybe that's it? It was so close the car was thinking, meh, why bother, the driver is already braking, I can't help out anymore...
I have posted some of these before, but for your convenience:
includes smaller size object avoidance testing. (you needed a larger hawk)

I would imagine the upgraded six sensor avoidance that is planned for Subaru eyesight (eyesight X) will improve upon these results.
 

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I would imagine the upgraded six sensor avoidance that is planned for Subaru eyesight (eyesight X) will improve upon these results.
I believe that the front two cameras and their processing will be improved, so, probably.

You all need to remind me to post some Eyesight object probability and mapping images this week (if anyone is interested in seeing them).

I'm off to prep for another off roading adventure and won't be back at my computer until Monday.
 

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I believe that the front two cameras and their processing will be improved, so, probably.

You all need to remind me to post some Eyesight object probability and mapping images this week (if anyone is interested in seeing them).

I'm off to prep for another off roading adventure and won't be back at my computer until Monday.
the planned front corner sensors will also improve objects coming in from the side since eyesight X will surely get an early reading and tracking of them prior to coming into the view of front cameras. Eyesight X is to provide 360 coverage. It sounded like they are going to try and blend the various types of sensors available such as radar which is not strictly visual with the current eyesight approach.
5248
 

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Not the type of 360 view in fancy cars.
5249


the planned front corner sensors will also improve objects coming in from the side since eyesight X will surely get an early reading and tracking of them prior to coming into the view of front cameras. Eyesight X is to provide 360 coverage. It sounded like they are going to try and blend the various types of sensors available such as radar which is not strictly visual with the current eyesight approach.
View attachment 5248
 

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Well, yes, but not like that, really. It would use stereoscopic 3D point swarm plotting and mapping, trajectory calculations ...

Additionally, it can detect and identify certain types of objects.
Really? Is this a guess or an educated guess. Because that's not at all how I would have designed it. Then again, given the long lead time for cars' systems they might not have foreseen the advances in Machine Learning.

The identify part really makes me think Machine Learning.
 

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I guess I wasn't as clear as I could have been. I actually do have some minor experience with machine learning and vision systems.
Knowing what you know, you'll understand that the object (bird) was likely successfully detected by the imaging system, but also detected in an excluded zone.

If you think about it, with the scenario you've just described, driving under a bridge would likely respond the same way as driving under a bird. Given the lack of computing power to do object recognition and trajectory prediction, it's likely Eyesight was trained to ignore the object.

My broad guess is due to the cost (lack thereof) of the vehicle, we are doing object detection, not image recognition. I also don't believe we're projecting where those objects will be, only where those objects are, and where our vehicle will be.

Major caveat - my image recognition and object detection projects have only been at the cellular level, and my computer vision projects have only ever been as complicated as label recognition.
 

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Knowing what you know, you'll understand that the object (bird) was likely successfully detected by the imaging system, but also detected in an excluded zone.

If you think about it, with the scenario you've just described, driving under a bridge would likely respond the same way as driving under a bird. Given the lack of computing power to do object recognition and trajectory prediction, it's likely Eyesight was trained to ignore the object.

My broad guess is due to the cost (lack thereof) of the vehicle, we are doing object detection, not image recognition. I also don't believe we're projecting where those objects will be, only where those objects are, and where our vehicle will be.

Major caveat - my image recognition and object detection projects have only been at the cellular level, and my computer vision projects have only ever been as complicated as label recognition.
My guess is that the system does to some degree project where an object will be. We know eyesight calculates the delta speed and direction the object is relative to our vehicle. In one of my above posted videos we can see a real life avoidance from a vehicle coming in from the right of the Ascent. Either it projected the incursion or the tolerance of the fixed incursion zone is such that the system will recognize the danger in time to react.
 

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Really? Is this a guess or an educated guess. Because that's not at all how I would have designed it. Then again, given the long lead time for cars' systems they might not have foreseen the advances in Machine Learning.

The identify part really makes me think Machine Learning.
Remember, identify isn't relevant to "stop before I hit something" in pre collision braking scenarios.

Edit: LMAO auto correct.
 

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My guess is that the system does to some degree project where an object will be. We know eyesight calculates the delta speed and direction the object is relative to our vehicle. In one of my above posted videos we can see a real life avoidance from a vehicle coming in from the right of the Ascent. Either it projected the incursion or the tolerance of the fixed incursion zone is such that the system will recognize the danger in time to react.
Exactly. And continuously updates those values based on what you and the object (and potentially its own interaction) have done in each data acquisition window.
 

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We were on a back woods logging road in NW Maine this last weekend. We flushed a hawk from a tree who flew right down on the road in front of us, at about the driver's head height. We were doing about 25-30 mph and I hit the brakes and the bird was still getting closer so I hit them harder, bringing us to a crawl. At that point the bird made it safely away.

No beeps, no braking, nothing, from Eyesight. I would have figured at least a beep would have happened. Admittedly it was a pretty unusual situation but I think that Eyesight would have notice something weird going on. It's not often you have a big bird above your front bumper, the stereo vision would have given a clear range to it.

Maybe that's it? It was so close the car was thinking, meh, why bother, the driver is already braking, I can't help out anymore...
Mine with ID a dog, deer etc, Also have to remember to shut it off in the car wash 😂
 

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We were on a back woods logging road in NW Maine this last weekend. We flushed a hawk from a tree who flew right down on the road in front of us, at about the driver's head height. We were doing about 25-30 mph and I hit the brakes and the bird was still getting closer so I hit them harder, bringing us to a crawl. At that point the bird made it safely away.

No beeps, no braking, nothing, from Eyesight. I would have figured at least a beep would have happened. Admittedly it was a pretty unusual situation but I think that Eyesight would have notice something weird going on. It's not often you have a big bird above your front bumper, the stereo vision would have given a clear range to it.

Maybe that's it? It was so close the car was thinking, meh, why bother, the driver is already braking, I can't help out anymore...
Just my opinion, I don’t know that I’d want it to react or emergency brake at a bird flying towards me. Imagine the same scenario on a CA Highway, or a beach for that matter.
 
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