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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
UPDATE: Thank you all for your responses and generosity with your time and knowledge. While I would love to get the F2414 for size and dual axel, I've decided to focus my hunt on the F2114. Knowing that with the weight of the lighter trailer, I have more wiggle room regarding what I pack was the deciding factor.

Happy New Year all!

+++++++

We drive an Ascent Limited and are looking for a trailer that would suit us (me, husband, 13 yr old daughter and cat) for long term (3-6 mths)/ long distance travel. We have never owned a trailer and have zero experience towing. I've read through many of the incredible posts in this forum, but am now seeking direct advice.

I would love to get the F2414 as it's the most spacious trailer (I will need to work and my. daughter will be in school, we we'll need two work spaces), but based on what I've read here, and considering the large amount of gear we will have in the trailer for such a long trip, I'm concerned there is no way to tow the F2414.

I look forward to hearing from Alto owners and anyone else who wants to chime in as we need as much advice as we can get. I am also open to learning about other trailers.

Thanks!
 

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2021 Ascent Premium White (NEW!! 馃槏) 2015 Legacy 3.6R White (Former 馃槶) 2006 Subaru Impreza (Former)
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Judging from the specs I can see, the weight on the Alto F2414 should work for towing, however, I don't see the tongue weight for the hitch and that can make or break a decision for this trailer for sure.
 

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Tongue weight matters a whole bunch...and it's loaded tongue weight you need to ascertain, not the dry weight that the manufacturer gives. One other thing...if the 24 in the model number refers to length, I'm going to suggest you consider the shorter versions. beyond 21' with a short tow vehicle like the Ascent isn't the best idea. And that includes similar size tow vehicles that have higher weight capacities. Length also matters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Tongue weight matters a whole bunch...and it's loaded tongue weight you need to ascertain, not the dry weight that the manufacturer gives. One other thing...if the 24 in the model number refers to length, I'm going to suggest you consider the shorter versions. beyond 21' with a short tow vehicle like the Ascent isn't the best idea. And that includes similar size tow vehicles that have higher weight capacities. Length also matters.
Thank you Jim!
 

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One consideration is whether this is (a) a one-time (or two-time) long drive with a lot of camping in one place, or (b) a multi-stop long-range adventure.

For (a), it might be possible to tow empty and light, then grab your groceries and fill water once you're camped. Of course you'd have to deplete for the return drive. And other items like chairs and tables and clothes would factor into total tow weight. For (b), which is more of what this sounds like, you really do have to plan out the weight of everything, and get that all in well under specs.

F.S.
 

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2019 Subaru Ascent Limited 2010 Subaru Legacy GT limited
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Check this out,


I am quite intrigued by this trailer, the specs are on the longer side, but the weight and shape make me think it will tow just fine behind the Ascent. The tongue weight will be the biggest thing to watch for, otherwise pack wisely and it shouldn't be an issue. If you can test tow I would definitely recommend that as well. As delivered specs seem to fit the ascent fine.

One thing I noticed is the lack of tank capacity, but as long as you plan to glamp rather than dry camp that becomes a non-issue. Something to consider there. For reference, our trailer has 30 gallon tanks all around and 4 of us 2 adults 4 and 8 yr old can go about a week on the black tank and maybe 3 days on 30 gallons of water, grey tank is our biggest issue we fill it in about 2 days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
One consideration is whether this is (a) a one-time (or two-time) long drive with a lot of camping in one place, or (b) a multi-stop long-range adventure.

For (a), it might be possible to tow empty and light, then grab your groceries and fill water once you're camped. Of course you'd have to deplete for the return drive. And other items like chairs and tables and clothes would factor into total tow weight. For (b), which is more of what this sounds like, you really do have to plan out the weight of everything, and get that all in well under specs.

F.S.
Such good feedback! It is absolutely a "B" type trip. So focusing on the F2114 or A2124 is the way to go. Thank you.
 

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The length would be my main concern - 24' is too long to tow with an Ascent or any other SUV with a short wheel length. Maybe a Tahoe. The order wait is on the order of 2 years unless you are lucky to find one for sale - pretty much true for all Altos. And I understand Alto is running 2 to 6 weeks behind schedule as a result of supply shortages.
 

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The length would be my main concern - 24' is too long to tow with an Ascent or any other SUV with a short wheel length. Maybe a Tahoe. The order wait is on the order of 2 years unless you are lucky to find one for sale - pretty much true for all Altos. And I understand Alto is running 2 to 6 weeks behind schedule as a result of supply shortages.
Our trailer is 26' long hitch to bumper and it tows just fine behind the ascent, its quite a bit heavier than the alto as well. I would love to see the science behind trailer length vs wheelbase. I suspect as with many things its an archaic rule of thumb which has outlived its usefulness. Today's vehicles are miles better than when these towing rules were created. We hear it a lot when we go camping, and my response when the wife asks, "if we had an f150 we would be told we should have gotten an f250, if we had an f250 we would be told we needed the f350....and so on". ten minutes researching tow vehicles on RV forums and you will see the pattern as well.
 

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Our trailer is 26' long hitch to bumper and it tows just fine behind the ascent, its quite a bit heavier than the alto as well. I would love to see the science behind trailer length vs wheelbase. I suspect as with many things its an archaic rule of thumb which has outlived its usefulness. Today's vehicles are miles better than when these towing rules were created. We hear it a lot when we go camping, and my response when the wife asks, "if we had an f150 we would be told we should have gotten an f250, if we had an f250 we would be told we needed the f350....and so on". ten minutes researching tow vehicles on RV forums and you will see the pattern as well.
I doubt you will find any formulas that either confirm or deny trailer length to wheelbase. It is all about leverage - the longer the trailer the more leverage it will have on the tow vehicle and likewise the shorter the wheelbase of the TV the more leverage a certain length trailer will have on the TV. So it comes down to what safety factor you want to have. But I do agree that newer vehicles have better towing capacity, i.e. trailer sway control , suspensions, etc as well as tires have better grip which all affect what that particular vehicle can tow (leverage) It's just my opinion which isn鈥檛 scientifically proven.
 

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I doubt you will find any formulas that either confirm or deny trailer length to wheelbase. It is all about leverage - the longer the trailer the more leverage it will have on the tow vehicle and likewise the shorter the wheelbase of the TV the more leverage a certain length trailer will have on the TV. So it comes down to what safety factor you want to have. But I do agree that newer vehicles have better towing capacity, i.e. trailer sway control , suspensions, etc as well as tires have better grip which all affect what that particular vehicle can tow (leverage) It's just my opinion which isn鈥檛 scientifically proven.
It also depends how you tow. Towing at 55mph-60mph is tons different than towing at 75mph. All the issues like trailer sway are amplified with speed. So you can go more "to the limit" on any tow vehicle if you keep to reasonable speeds (< 65mph). It's also a lot better on the trailer tires as the loads on the tires go up significantly with speed (much more chance of blowouts at >75mph than < 65mph).

Also towing near the limit means you need to be much more careful what you pack and how. Weight all your gear can get you a nearly exact trailer weight and actually weighing your tongue after loading means you are actually in spec and not just guessing. You can reduce tongue weight by moving weight behind the axles (like a see-saw), but you don't want your tongue weight too light or you will induce sway. So it's a balancing act.

So if you want to be more carefree about loading/tongue weight/etc, get a trailer that's not near the limit. If the bigger space is more important, then you will need to spend more time ensuring you are loaded up properly each time you go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Tongue weight matters a whole bunch...and it's loaded tongue weight you need to ascertain, not the dry weight that the manufacturer gives. One other thing...if the 24 in the model number refers to length, I'm going to suggest you consider the shorter versions. beyond 21' with a short tow vehicle like the Ascent isn't the best idea. And that includes similar size tow vehicles that have higher weight capacities. Length also matters.
It also depends how you tow. Towing at 55mph-60mph is tons different than towing at 75mph. All the issues like trailer sway are amplified with speed. So you can go more "to the limit" on any tow vehicle if you keep to reasonable speeds (< 65mph). It's also a lot better on the trailer tires as the loads on the tires go up significantly with speed (much more chance of blowouts at >75mph than < 65mph).

Also towing near the limit means you need to be much more careful what you pack and how. Weight all your gear can get you a nearly exact trailer weight and actually weighing your tongue after loading means you are actually in spec and not just guessing. You can reduce tongue weight by moving weight behind the axles (like a see-saw), but you don't want your tongue weight too light or you will induce sway. So it's a balancing act.

So if you want to be more carefree about loading/tongue weight/etc, get a trailer that's not near the limit. If the bigger space is more important, then you will need to spend more time ensuring you are loaded up properly each time you go.
This is hugely helpful, thank you! The last thing I want is to blow a tire and be stranded in the boondocks with a 13 year old with special needs.
 

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2019 Subaru Ascent Limited 2010 Subaru Legacy GT limited
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You should consider the balance of dual axles and a single axle. Most people on here would agree a heavier dual axle is going to be much easier to balance cargo and tow than a single. The dual axle is also more stable on the highway.

Happy hunting!

For reference I attached a picture of our jayco 22bhm behind our ascent. The f2414 is roughly a foot shorter and 1000 lbs lighter. We've towed up to 8 hrs away and speeds up to 75 mph without issue.
 

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Ruben, I think that that beautiful wrap makes it tow better, too... :) :D
 
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