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Are there any tips or suggestions as far as driving techniques and care for the turbo as compared to a “regular” engine? I’ve read things which talk about warming up the car after starting and idling when you return from a drive.
 

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There are no special consideration with your turbo.

Other than ...Keep oil in it, fresh. Don't push past recommended intervals. In fact changing a little early is always better. Don't overheat it. Other than that, just drive.
 

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Are there any tips or suggestions as far as driving techniques and care for the turbo as compared to a “regular” engine? I’ve read things which talk about warming up the car after starting and idling when you return from a drive.
Warming up is mainly for the oil so it can get in/around the turbo. Probably more apt to older turbos which sat up significantly higher than the oil pump and before these newer 0w-20 weight oils. Still regardless of the vehicle it's *better* to not push the motor till it's warmed up and warmed up doesn't mean the blue "cold" light goes away it's an oil up to temp.

Idling after a drive was more to let the turbo spool down and keeping pressured oil around the bearings. If you weren't beating on it and shut if off quickly you'll be fine. If you run it to redline don't shut if off right after. Where the turbo sits it will probably hold oil better than the old location. But how much extra wear would there be from not "idling"? I've never heard anyone quantify it.
 

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It has been suggested to let the car idle for a short bit when you first start it up so the turbo gets some oil to keep it lubricated. Likewise if you’ve been towing heavy or driving very aggressively, it’s a good idea to let it idle for a bit to allow it to cool down.

However I doubt anyone is going to drive their suv aggressively enough to create that kind of heat for their turbocharger. Just use common sense. Let it idle for a minute in the morning and you should be good.
 

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The amount of time it takes the engine to pressurize the oil is minimal. The turbo won't even be in use until you are well out of your driveway or parking spot, and have space to hit the accelerator hard.

Similarly, the turbo is in vacuum when you are idling or braking and into your parking space, so it's getting plenty of time to cool down before you shut down.

It's much different if you are taking your turboed car to a track day and thrashing it hard around a course, then coming to a quick stop and shutting down right away.

Even hard towing really shouldn't be much of an issue with the Ascent's turbo.
 

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The amount of time it takes the engine to pressurize the oil is minimal.
You mean instant. I have a oil pressure gauges on both of my car. One is off a galley plug location. The other car is at a sandwich plate at the oil filter location. Both gauges instantly hit 95-100 psi the split second the car starts. The turbo on the Ascent is both oil lubricated and coolant cooled. Pressures at the turbo location are instant.
 

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There is notting special about modern turbos. Idling before or after driving any modern turbo engine is not necessary for a long time...
It is important to notice that engine (and transmission) are nowhere near operating temperature when blue light turns off (around 100F).
My 2015 Forester XT has similar engine/CVT and there are 3 different temperatures when engine/transmission change behavior.
Around 100F, blue light goes off, idle RPMs go down.
Around 130F torque converter locks and it is the most noticeable in manual mode (even more so with Si drive in XT). RPMs are still high at this point, CVT will not go into tallest ratios and it is far from optimal temperature.
Only about 170F, engine and transmission start behaving "normally" and I would say it is safe to drive without restrictions.
Personally, I wait until about 190F to go hard on my XT.
I agree with being religious about regular and good oil changes. Subaru's oil interval recommendations for USA market are so conservative so all you need is to follow it, no extra care in necessary. I would watch for a carbon buildup over time but that is different subject.
 

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My only suggestion is take it easy as you pull into your parking sport or garage before turning it off. I really don't think the modern turbos need as much care unless you are racing it.

Of course follow the maintenance schedule and make sure there is oil in the car!
 

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In general, I would say treat your Ascent like the owner's manual states. The initial break in period is probably the most important time of your vehicle's ownership. I baby it for the first 1,000 miles. After that, drive it like the adult you are. It's not a Porsche. It's a family SUV. Reading the owners manual usually puts most people to sleep. However, it has a wealth of information that can protect your major investment. Good Luck!
 

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The Ascent does great at keeping one driving more serenely when cold.

Warming up is mainly for the oil so it can get in/around the turbo. Probably more apt to older turbos which sat up significantly higher than the oil pump and before these newer 0w-20 weight oils. Still regardless of the vehicle it's *better* to not push the motor till it's warmed up and warmed up doesn't mean the blue "cold" light goes away it's an oil up to temp.
It has been suggested to let the car idle for a short bit when you first start it up so the turbo gets some oil to keep it lubricated. Likewise if you’ve been towing heavy or driving very aggressively, it’s a good idea to let it idle for a bit to allow it to cool down.
Yep, and when it's really cold, the Ascent is QUITE good at keeping power limited until the drivetrain reaches a certain temperature.

However I doubt anyone is going to drive their suv aggressively enough to create that kind of heat for their turbocharger.
Well, almost anyone. :grin: :tango_face_wink:
 

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However I doubt anyone is going to drive their suv aggressively enough to create that kind of heat for their turbocharger. Just use common sense. Let it idle for a minute in the morning and you should be good.
Que?

 

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However I doubt anyone is going to drive their suv aggressively enough to create that kind of heat for their turbocharger. Just use common sense. Let it idle for a minute in the morning and you should be good.
It may be less than 1%, but there are definitely those of us who thoroughly enjoy our turbo and use it to the fullest!

"Where did that big blue SUV just go?!?!?" :devil:
 

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If the engine is cold (and the temperature gauge is the coolant temperature, not the turbo temp) take it slow to let the turbo and oil warm up. After spirited driving, wait a minute or two to let Turbo spool down and reduce oil temp before turning off. This is both a Volvo and Mercedes-Benz recommendation and it was identical to the recommendations on my 82 Volvo Turbo. I don’t find this takes a whole lot of effort.
 

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Some modern cars have a secondary electric water pump that keeps circulating coolant to the turbo after you turn the engine off. Does anyone know if the Ascent has one?
 

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