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I have a 2020 Touring model and when I start driving and it's cold (50 degrees outside) it will get up to 3000 rpm (35 mph) or more before shifting and then I have to let off the gas to get it to shift. Is anyone else having this problem?
 

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I have a 2020 Touring model and when I start driving and it's cold (50 degrees outside) it will get up to 3000 rpm (35 mph) or more before shifting and then I have to let off the gas to get it to shift. Is anyone else having this problem?
That isn't a problem - it is by design. The car will warm itself up while maintaining higher RPMs in the range you're describing, and then begin to "shift" normally.
 

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This isn't any thing new with automatic transmissions. My 03 dodge Dakota had the 5 speed auto and, in real cold weather(<20 degrees) would not shift out of 2nd in the same manner the op is speaking about.
 

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I have a 2020 Touring model and when I start driving and it's cold (50 degrees outside) it will get up to 3000 rpm (35 mph) or more before shifting and then I have to let off the gas to get it to shift. Is anyone else having this problem?
I brought my 2020 Limited in for it's first service this morning. Currently have 5800 miles on it. I have noticed that when the engine is cold the RPMs like to jump. I figured it was either natural or the ECU needed to be reprogrammed. they let the engine cool down and conducted the oil change and then took it out on a test drive and the tech immediately noticed what I was talking about. they can't see any code on their end but because the tech was able to get the problem to occur for him on three separate occasions, they sent the information to Subaru of America and hopefully I will have an answer within the next few days. I asked if they thought it was the ECU or the transmission and they were pretty sure it was a transmission issue. I'm not really worried though because it's all covered under warranty, it's just kind of annoying
 

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The turbocharged engine needs to reach a certain temperature before it offers more moderate RPM. This is normal operation. During colder weather, this process takes a little longer for obvious reasons. The higher RPMs is to help with the warm-up process.

Now if the behavior continues after the vehicle is properly warmed up, it needs attention.
 
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The turbocharged engine needs to reach a certain temperature before it offers more moderate RPM. This is normal operation. During colder weather, this process takes a little longer for obvious reasons. The higher RPMs is to help with the warm-up process.

Now if the behavior continues after the vehicle is properly warmed up, it needs attention.
Yes, I am fully aware. This is not my first turbo charged engine and this is definitely enough for the tech to think something is wrong. Why not let SoA look at the data? What's it gonna hurt?
 

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I don't believe I said to not get it checked out if the behavior is abnormal... ;) It makes sense for it to be analyzed if something is amiss.
 

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I brought my 2020 Limited in for it's first service this morning. Currently have 5800 miles on it. I have noticed that when the engine is cold the RPMs like to jump. I figured it was either natural or the ECU needed to be reprogrammed. they let the engine cool down and conducted the oil change and then took it out on a test drive and the tech immediately noticed what I was talking about. they can't see any code on their end but because the tech was able to get the problem to occur for him on three separate occasions, they sent the information to Subaru of America and hopefully I will have an answer within the next few days. I asked if they thought it was the ECU or the transmission and they were pretty sure it was a transmission issue. I'm not really worried though because it's all covered under warranty, it's just kind of annoying
Is it just the high revs, or are you noticing anything else strange with it? By jumping, you mean holding higher revs than what one would deem typically normal?
 

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Just high revs when there engine is cold especially going up hill. Heard back from SoA and they didn't see anything wrong. It was documented though just in case it is. The "jumping" is normal. I can't remember exactly what it is but it has something to do with the torque converter
 

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Just high revs when there engine is cold especially going up hill. Heard back from SoA and they didn't see anything wrong. It was documented though just in case it is. The "jumping" is normal. I can't remember exactly what it is but it has something to do with the torque converter
Yes, high revs, around 3,000 rpm, is normal on the Ascent when cold.
The "jumping" would be the torque converter lockup, which happens near the 2,000 rpm mark.

Hope that helps.
 

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Yes, high revs, around 3,000 rpm, is normal on the Ascent when cold.
The "jumping" would be the torque converter lockup, which happens near the 2,000 rpm mark.

Hope that helps.
It does. This is definitely the weirdest Subaru I've owned, and that includes my WRX
 

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It does. This is definitely the weirdest Subaru I've owned, and that includes my WRX
lol, it's definitely different. So far, I've noticed that the various configurations of the TR690 (even though the insides are the same) each feel quite different. If you ever get bored, and manage to find one, find a 2010 Subaru Outback with a CVT. It'll be a TR690 that will feel very different than what you've experienced in your WRX and Ascent. I think the 2015 Foz XT came with a Faux-6-Speed TR690, and the new Outback XT and Ascent have 8 fake gears and the same engine - but with the different clamping pressure and ratios, they each feel different, even though they have the same engines mated to the TR690's.
 
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