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I'm curious. For those of you out there that had the transmission problem and got it replaced... before the transmission bit the dust were you getting horrible gas mileage no matter what you tried doing?

We drive like normal people and could never get it above 16.3 MPG city and 17.4 highway. That is WAY UNDER what the sticker says. I tried months worth of 87 to 93 gas and neither made a difference. Driving at 10 meters above sea level.

I'm wondering if you all noticed the same problem? Maybe there was something wrong with those transmissions that caused extra friction and burden on the engine causing it to overwork, thus resulting in poorer gas mileage and ultimately killing the transmission.
 

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I replaced my OEM battery after it failed at 2000 miles. After that, I gained something like 2-4 mpg in fuel economy. I suspect that the battery had been close to dead the whole time and the alternator was working harder and putting a greater continuous load on the engine.

I don't have any better theory than that as to why my gas mileage picked up so much. It's possible there's some kind of explanation around engine break-in, but it's too much of a coincidence I saw it improve right after the battery was replaced.
 

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No. The two are unrelated.
 

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I replaced my OEM battery after it failed at 2000 miles. After that, I gained something like 2-4 mpg in fuel economy. I suspect that the battery had been close to dead the whole time and the alternator was working harder and putting a greater continuous load on the engine.

I don't have any better theory than that as to why my gas mileage picked up so much. It's possible there's some kind of explanation around engine break-in, but it's too much of a coincidence I saw it improve right after the battery was replaced.
Yes, a dead battery (physical defect, such as a bad cell or two), can cause worse gas mileage, because the alternator has to work harder trying (and failing) to charge the battery, which will require using more gas to compensate, in a similar way that any other load on the engine does the same.
 

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Yes, a dead battery (physical defect, such as a bad cell or two), can cause worse gas mileage, because the alternator has to work harder trying (and failing) to charge the battery, which will require using more gas to compensate, in a similar way that any other load on the engine does the same.
I'm also familiar from this in the marine environment. Some people put oversize alternators on their engines so they can drive inverters underway without running a generator or charge large battery arrays, and it always dings fuel economy.
 

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I'm curious. For those of you out there that had the transmission problem and got it replaced... before the transmission bit the dust were you getting horrible gas mileage no matter what you tried doing?

We drive like normal people and could never get it above 16.3 MPG city and 17.4 highway. That is WAY UNDER what the sticker says. I tried months worth of 87 to 93 gas and neither made a difference. Driving at 10 meters above sea level.

I'm wondering if you all noticed the same problem? Maybe there was something wrong with those transmissions that caused extra friction and burden on the engine causing it to overwork, thus resulting in poorer gas mileage and ultimately killing the transmission.
Yes my 18 month old Touring's transmission bit the dust three weeks ago. And yes the mpg started to suffer before the failure.
 

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I'm curious. For those of you out there that had the transmission problem and got it replaced... before the transmission bit the dust were you getting horrible gas mileage no matter what you tried doing?

We drive like normal people and could never get it above 16.3 MPG city and 17.4 highway. That is WAY UNDER what the sticker says. I tried months worth of 87 to 93 gas and neither made a difference. Driving at 10 meters above sea level.

I'm wondering if you all noticed the same problem? Maybe there was something wrong with those transmissions that caused extra friction and burden on the engine causing it to overwork, thus resulting in poorer gas mileage and ultimately killing the transmission.
 
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