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Discussion Starter #1
We recently purchased an Rpod and the folks that sold it to us gave us a 2" drop receiver that is 8.25" from the center of the pin to the center of the ball. We aren't sure if this is the correct length and I can't find any information on requirements. Our trailer is around 3,200 pounds. We'd like to add a power jack to the trailer and are having a clearance issue as well. So the second question is, can we go to a receiver that is 9" in length? From looking on Amazon, I think ours is already a little longer than the standard but I can't imagine that Subaru would have us use such a short length that the rear hatch won't open at all. It does now, but just barely.

Has anyone tried a receiver of 9" or so? I'm not talking about using an extension, just a slightly longer receiver.

Thanks for your help!
 

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I think you are referring to the Ball mount. The receiver is the part that gets mounted permanently onto your vehicle. The receiver receives the ball mount. Because the Ascent is rated to tow 5000 Lb max you need a ball mount that is Class 3 rated, which is rated for 6000 Lbs. This 2" x 2" solid steel ball mount comes in varying lengths. There are only differences of a few inches, so no problem doing what you are attempting to. What is of crucial importance is the drop the ball mount has. The ball mount that came with the 2019 Ascent had a 6" drop which put the top of the ball at approximately 19" above the ground. With your trailer perfectly level measure from the ground to where the top of the ball would touch inside the trailer tongue. This tells you what you need in terms of the drop. More info can be found here.

 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for the great information! All of the new terminology is sort of driving me crazy! It explains why I haven't been able to find any information. If you do an internet search using all the wrong words you find --- nothing!

We have a 2020 Touring Ascent which didn't come with any ball mount. We just have the one that was given to us. So I measured what was suggested on etrailer and the difference between the car and trailer are 3 inches (Hitch height on the car is 23 1/4", coupler height 20 1/4". We did notice when we hooked it up to test that the trailer was slightly higher but figured once the car was packed with stuff, it would sink slightly. However, it appears that isn't the case and I should get a 3 inch drop. I found a 3 1/4 inch drop that I think will fit the bill.

One more question if you don't mind. When the mounts list a length, do they mean the entire length of the unit or does it refer to the distance between those two holes?
 

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Usually on an adjustable ball mount it shows the the distance between the adjustment holes but email them to be sure. You really want to know the length of the shank between the the pin hole and the ball. Goodluck.
 

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I tow a 2019 Jayco 154BH Baja Edition trailer. I use a ball hitch/stinger with a 7.5 inch shank and a 2" drop. The trailer's hitch sits at around 25" above the ground, so for my single axle trailer, like your R-Pod, it sits with a slightly nose down attitude (assuming you have the Hood River Edition). The 7.5" shank (measured center of pin lock to center of ball) works just fine from a clearance perspective for my trailer's jack handle and the rear gate, assuming the jack handle is in the down position when I open and close the rear gate, though there's not a lot of extra space.. I think many, if not most, electric jacks protrude further to the front on the top of the jack than a manual jack handle does, so this distance, as you've determined, will be more critical. Another thing to remember is the farther to the rear of the Ascent you move the ball, as I've done and you are proposing, in comparison to the stock 6" drop stinger which sits closer to the car, will probably lower your allowable tongue weight from 500lbs to something less, though depending on the model of R-Pod you're considering may not be an issue. One last thing, my manual jack works great and is very easy to operate, and though I could replace it with an electric jack I decided it wasn't worth it. If it was a bigger trailer, maybe I would.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ratbag - thank you!

AnacortesArmyGuy - Thank you for taking the time to reply to my post. Your information is very helpful! We do just barely clear the hand crank with the 8.25" shank length as long as the handle is in the down position. Cranking isn't that hard as long as by husbands and my shoulders cooperate (he has had two rotator cuff surgeries and has arthritis in both shoulder joints, I have a small tear in my left rotator cuff that we wouldn't want to aggravate. So we were just trying to be careful and not hurt ourselves further. The only 3" drop shank we found is 9" long so that should help and instead of a big power jack, we might go try the JXC-2 Trailer Center Mount - Drill Powered, 5K Capacity (Includes Free Drill Attachment). It's a regular small sized trailer jack but as the description states, it can use a drill!
 

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FWIW, there are folding trailer jacks. These have cranks that turn in a vertical plane, and once the wheel is off the ground, you rotate the jack horizontal which gives great ground clearance and often will clear the tailgate. You don't have to keep cranking the jack to get ground clearance. I use these on my trailers. Here's an example, though not one I have:

 

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My 5x8 utility trailer has one of those foldable jacks and it's very effective. It's important that it be rated for the weight of the specific trailer, however...many of them are only designed for lighter-weight trailers like mine. Check the specifications carefully.
 

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^^^ yes. Very good point. Of course it's not holding up the entire trailer weight, but it is holding up something more than the tongue weight as it's closer to the trailer's axle than the ball coupling. You can easily calculate it:

Weight on jack = (Tongue weight) x (axle to ball) / (axle to jack)

Then there's going to be some additional weight of you moving around it the trailer etc. so figure in a margin for that.

The one I linked to has a 1000 lb capacity, which I think would be sufficient for your trailer.
 

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For ground clearance and hatch clearance I use the Jack-E-Up. This device lets you totally remove the trailer jack (manual or electric) so your hatch clears and there is nothing to drag when entering/leaving parking lots. I love it. I also store the tongue jack inside the trailer behind the axle to reduce tongue weight.
Jack E Up Home page
 

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We pull a rpod 178 with our 2019 Ascent. The supplied hitch, receiver, and ball works perfectly.
 
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