Subaru Ascent Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,966 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since I am purchasing winter snow tires and will eventually be in the market for summer tires that I can use on the Ascent during warmer months. Do they even make these anymore, or has all of this category been taken over by all season tires?
 

·
Super Moderator
2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
Joined
·
4,569 Posts
Most of the market is all-season to my eyes and if you live in an area where you truly need winter tires, then all-season/three-season are likely a good choice at the beginning and end of "non-winter" time period anyway. That said, many manufacturers have a series of quality ratings they display that can be helpful in choosing a tire that's more optimal for warm weather driving. Michelin does that, for example. Look for good wet/braking performance and other factors that are required for summer driving to be rated higher than things that are more cold weather focused.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,966 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was curious and I just looked at Discount tire options for an Ascent summer tire and found that they offer one at $330/each and with a laughable 20,000 mile tread warranty. Why in the world would anyone buy this?
https://www.discounttire.com/buy-tires/michelin-pilot-sport-4-suv/p/42872. I guess when the time comes I will go with a good high temp all season. For now I am with the OEM and soon to change over into winter tire mode.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
I was curious and I just looked at Discount tire options for an Ascent summer tire and found that they offer one at $330/each and with a laughable 20,000 mile tread warranty. Why in the world would anyone buy this?
https://www.discounttire.com/buy-tires/michelin-pilot-sport-4-suv/p/42872. I guess when the time comes I will go with a good high temp all season. For now I am with the OEM and soon to change over into winter tire mode.
GRIP GRIP GRIP

Those are very good high performance tires. The kind you stick on a 4-500+ hp suv

The Ascent doesn’t have the suspension or power to take advantage of those tires, but you could probably take a turns at 2x what you normally would safely and stop shorter?

I’d love a set for mountain roads during the summer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
807 Posts
Yes, my MKZ ( don't ask, came from the factory that way) and Vette have hi po summer tires. The manufacturers actually state the tires are no good below 45f in both cases.

And I can assure you that on my MKZ, I nearly died multiple times driving the summer tires in the one moderate snow we had before my winter wheels and tires came in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,966 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes, my MKZ ( don't ask, came from the factory that way) and Vette have hi po summer tires. The manufacturers actually state the tires are no good below 45f in both cases.

And I can assure you that on my MKZ, I nearly died multiple times driving the summer tires in the one moderate snow we had before my winter wheels and tires came in.
Are you happy with their warm weather performance? How many miles do the last?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
I have had some last 8-10k on the rears, 20k on the front

Michelin Pilot Super Sport 15k warranty for staggered. My go to sports car tire.

Falken RT615 - no warranty ? they were sticky but not predictable. Never really felt confident pushing these as you don’t know when it loses traction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
835 Posts
packout - Tire life is somewhat variable - watch racing on TV, and you'll invariably come upon drivers for whom the race commentators note are "hard on tires" or "easy on tires." That's the same with us average folks driving on the street, too.

Some folks just work their tires harder than others. And the OEM Falken thread(s) we have going here testifies to this as well.

Also of big impact are differences in the vehicle fitment, as well as how the vehicle is both set up (suspension) as well as maintained (down to tire pressure).

And, of-course, if someone actually puts their vehicle on the track....that's going to throw the whole equation off.

A rough idea? That's OK - but just know that there's liable to be quite a bit of variability. ;)

And as Percy Garris noted above, if your vehicle is shod with summer-specific tires, for the love of all that is good, don't even venture a short jaunt with it should you get caught-out with an unexpected weather change. In the clear (without frozen precipitation - as we talked about in the other thread, packout, and in the videos that I refernced via SubaruForester.org), you'll be OK as long as you give an extra bit of reactionary distance...but look anywhere where folks talk about their experiences on summer-tires on ice or in snow, and you'll find the same tales of woe, with most drivers making references to hockey pucks.

That some race/race-capable tires require storage above freezing is one thing - not getting home because you've crashed or worse caused a collision on even just more pedestrian summer tires....that's just trouble no-one needs. :)

The wifey's '16 WRX came off-lease in March, and we decided that due to foreseeable events, we were going to take delivery of her replacement '19 WRX in February. We picked a day where there was no snow on the ground, and we left bright and early to get the old car safely down to the dealership and the new one home, where I popped on its winters immediately. Had there been snow on the ground, we'd either have waited, or I'd have thrown the '16's factory summers and my tools in the Ascent, and did a swap in their delivery bay.

My '16 OB came off-lease in November. I'll give everyone here two guesses what was on my doorsteps not a week after I took delivery of the Ascent. :p

I love summer tires, and the couple of days I spent at the Dubai Autodrome courtesy of Michelin and TireRack opened my eyes to their capabilities to a degree that I didn't imagine possible for street vehicles on street tires.

Unless you want to participate in autosports with your Ascent, I really don't feel that summer tires are necessary. For street driving, our OE Falkens are not half bad at all.

But if you've got a high-performance vehicle in the stable that's destined for a fun life, tire upgrades really should always be in your budget.

It's just like having winter tires, packout, which you have experience with - but flip the season and the purpose. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,966 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
packout - Tire life is somewhat variable - watch racing on TV, and you'll invariably come upon drivers for whom the race commentators note are "hard on tires" or "easy on tires." That's the same with us average folks driving on the street, too.

Some folks just work their tires harder than others. And the OEM Falken thread(s) we have going here testifies to this as well.

Also of big impact are differences in the vehicle fitment, as well as how the vehicle is both set up (suspension) as well as maintained (down to tire pressure).

And, of-course, if someone actually puts their vehicle on the track....that's going to throw the whole equation off.

A rough idea? That's OK - but just know that there's liable to be quite a bit of variability. ;)

And as Percy Garris noted above, if your vehicle is shod with summer-specific tires, for the love of all that is good, don't even venture a short jaunt with it should you get caught-out with an unexpected weather change. In the clear (without frozen precipitation - as we talked about in the other thread, packout, and in the videos that I refernced via SubaruForester.org), you'll be OK as long as you give an extra bit of reactionary distance...but look anywhere where folks talk about their experiences on summer-tires on ice or in snow, and you'll find the same tales of woe, with most drivers making references to hockey pucks.

That some race/race-capable tires require storage above freezing is one thing - not getting home because you've crashed or worse caused a collision on even just more pedestrian summer tires....that's just trouble no-one needs. :)

The wifey's '16 WRX came off-lease in March, and we decided that due to foreseeable events, we were going to take delivery of her replacement '19 WRX in February. We picked a day where there was no snow on the ground, and we left bright and early to get the old car safely down to the dealership and the new one home, where I popped on its winters immediately. Had there been snow on the ground, we'd either have waited, or I'd have thrown the '16's factory summers and my tools in the Ascent, and did a swap in their delivery bay.

My '16 OB came off-lease in November. I'll give everyone here two guesses what was on my doorsteps not a week after I took delivery of the Ascent. :p

I love summer tires, and the couple of days I spent at the Dubai Autodrome courtesy of Michelin and TireRack opened my eyes to their capabilities to a degree that I didn't imagine possible for street vehicles on street tires.

Unless you want to participate in autosports with your Ascent, I really don't feel that summer tires are necessary. For street driving, our OE Falkens are not half bad at all.

But if you've got a high-performance vehicle in the stable that's destined for a fun life, tire upgrades really should always be in your budget.

It's just like having winter tires, packout, which you have experience with - but flip the season and the purpose. ;)
I will stick with all seasons and a winter tire. Thanks. I did not get the Ascent for hard cornering, just safe handling. I also do not have the budget to change out summer tires every month of so.:) Weather is too variable here, even in the summer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
807 Posts
I have pirelli p zero Nero uhp summer tires. I've got about 23,000 miles on them and they're about done ( that's a pretty good life span for an ultra high performance tire). I do a full alignment every changeover, so they have worn very evenly. I do drive the car in sport mode pretty much all the time, and I am hard on the tires. They're incredible in the dry, They are okay in the rain. Certainly you would never reach the limits to the tire in the rain in normal or even moderately aggressive driving, and I can't imagine what I would have to do to the reach the dry limits of this tire in a four-door sedan on the road.

why I have a 19" 40 series tire as standard issue on my MKZ I don't know, but that's what it came with. They are a little bit loud, considering the nature of the car, and they ride firm but not uncomfortably for an uhp tire. I am probably going with something a little more all season oriented for my next tire, not because of the ride, noise, or wear issues, but because I want something a little better in the rain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
835 Posts
I will stick with all seasons and a winter tire. Thanks. I did not get the Ascent for hard cornering, just safe handling. I also do not have the budget to change out summer tires every month of so.:) Weather is too variable here, even in the summer.
Nah, you don't need to change every month - they don't wear that fast ( well, unless you're driving THAT much, or THAT much/hard on a track! :D ).

And honestly, the vast majority of street-oriented summer tires will perform very admirably in the wet. As with any other sector of the market, wet performance is something that many drivers want, so much so that the enlargement of the performance envelope can actually make many of these summer tires "safer" than all-season tires in anything but really cold weather (but again, for street-oriented tires of this genre, it's not like they'll just turn into a pumpkin when a magical temperature is reached) and/or on frozen precipitation.

As Percy Garris so well noted, to even remotely approach the limits of these tires on public roads is really courting disaster. Even the most forgiving (those that audibly complain well short of their actual limits and/or have limits that only gradually lets go, rather than "awesome..awesome..awesome...oh no!" type of sudden) of these tires typically have limits so high that the car's really going to be at pretty high velocities - it'll go against every ounce of self-preservation instinct most reasonable folks have. Just like winter tires, I find it's better to simply replace the word "performance" with the word "safety." A larger performance envelope directly equates to a larger margin of safety. And for drivers who intend to stay within that envelope - i.e. no hooning - justifying the purchase of these tires by suggesting to your significant other/Household-6 wouldn't be lying.

There is often a compromise, though, again as Percy Garris pointed out. Sure, the expense is one thing, and so is the trouble of having to rotate between two sets of tires....but the real toll may be a very real, every-day NVH impact that can make the driver's otherwise very reasonable everyday commute and turn it into something that's only barely tolerable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,966 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Nah, you don't need to change every month - they don't wear that fast ( well, unless you're driving THAT much, or THAT much/hard on a track! :D ).

And honestly, the vast majority of street-oriented summer tires will perform very admirably in the wet. As with any other sector of the market, wet performance is something that many drivers want, so much so that the enlargement of the performance envelope can actually make many of these summer tires "safer" than all-season tires in anything but really cold weather (but again, for street-oriented tires of this genre, it's not like they'll just turn into a pumpkin when a magical temperature is reached) and/or on frozen precipitation.

As Percy Garris so well noted, to even remotely approach the limits of these tires on public roads is really courting disaster. Even the most forgiving (those that audibly complain well short of their actual limits and/or have limits that only gradually lets go, rather than "awesome..awesome..awesome...oh no!" type of sudden) of these tires typically have limits so high that the car's really going to be at pretty high velocities - it'll go against every ounce of self-preservation instinct most reasonable folks have. Just like winter tires, I find it's better to simply replace the word "performance" with the word "safety." A larger performance envelope directly equates to a larger margin of safety. And for drivers who intend to stay within that envelope - i.e. no hooning - justifying the purchase of these tires by suggesting to your significant other/Household-6 wouldn't be lying.

There is often a compromise, though, again as Percy Garris pointed out. Sure, the expense is one thing, and so is the trouble of having to rotate between two sets of tires....but the real toll may be a very real, every-day NVH impact that can make the driver's otherwise very reasonable everyday commute and turn it into something that's only barely tolerable.
I will have to remind my 16 year old of this when he end up purchasing his dream WRX. He wanted one now, but I knew that was not going to happen for all sorts of common sense practical reasons that parents tend to focus on. He ended up with buying a 2018 Impreza. The WRX can happen after 300,000 miles of Impreza.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top