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Discussion Starter #1
When we purchased our 2014 Forester in April 2013, we added the Gold Plus plan because it seemed to pencil out. We tend to keep our new cars a long time, the CVT and the changes to the engine were some things I considered. The car is covered to 2020 and would be an advantage when I pass it on to the next owner. Having been stung by a company that went bankrupt one year after buying a new Mazda in 1998, I was reluctant to even talk about the subject until I found out that Subaru was behind the plan. Any thoughts about getting a similar plan on the Subaru Ascent? Ours will be fully loaded so there will be lots of things that could go wrong. Extended warranties are offered for lots of consumer products that only make money for the people offering the plan. A refrigerator... I think not. TV, no I will take a pass. A car with lots of new tech in it... I am open for discussion.
 

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Honest question - I'm unfamiliar with the added security plan... I assume you are referring to the optional factory warranty extension?

I've never bought one on my cars, mostly because the general reliability on modern autos is such that it's not really needed (or so it seems the general consensus to be). That said, I understand your concern especially on a completely new vehicle with new engine, etc...

Now that you mention it, I'm wondering if that would be something to think about as well.
 

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Of course there will be an OEM extended warranty available for the Ascent through Subaru. That is a great profit center for both the dealership and Subaru corporate. I would certainly advise each buyer to consider purchasing this warranty as the Ascent is a brand new vehicle from Subaru. You should expect to pay between $1500-2000 for the GOLD extended warranty.
 

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When we purchased our 2015 Outback 3.6R we decided to get Gold Plus plan too. I hadn't ever gotten an extended warranty on a vehicle but since that Outback was the first year of a relatively thorough refresh and ours was fully loaded with Eyesight and other tech (way more than any car we had before), I figured it was worth a gamble. So far it's only at 45K miles and has been pretty rock solid and we haven't made use of the extended warranty yet, so it's kind of early to say whether we'll come out ahead or not.

If you are interested in the warranty I'd recommend shopping around for prices from various Subaru dealers. I did and got put onto Manchester Subaru in NH by the Outback forum and they priced the 7 yr/100K mile Gold Plus with $0 deductible that we were interested in at $1395 (plus no sales tax). I gave my local dealership here in Texas the chance to match it when we got to that point in the paperwork on the Outback purchase, but they couldn't or wouldn't come close, so I purchased the plan a few days later from Manchester. Same Subaru warranty and coverage no matter which dealer you buy it from. The only potential downside of buying it from another dealer is you can't roll it into your loan if you are wanting to do so, but we were intending to pay cash for the plan either way so that wasn't a concern.

All that being said, if we do get an Ascent in the first year or two I may consider it again, depending on the cost. Although I feel Subaru makes reliable cars, as mentioned with the Ascent being a completely new platform, engine, etc, I would have some of the same concerns about some minor issues popping up down the line. Even if it's nothing catastrophic like a full engine or transmission replacement, just a few failures of smaller components as the miles get up there can start to add up quickly.
 

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We purchased a Gold Plus Extended Warranty for our 2014 Forester XT thinking similarly to you. The engine was brand new at the time and the CVT in the turbo application was also a question mark. We really had no issues with the Forester at all, until around 75k miles when the CVT began making noise. The entire assembly was replaced under the Gold Plus Warranty, saving over $7000. Without the extended warranty, we would have had to pay out of pocket at that time.

I think the Ascent is a similar situation. It's very likely there will be no major issues, but with a new engine and transmission combination, there are some unknowns. If I was purchasing an Ascent now, I'd look into the extended warranty or at least think about purchasing it when getting near to running out of powertrain warranty coverage.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Long ago in another lifetime, I hired on at a new car dealership to work on British cars. They also sold Datsun. So, I had to add metric tools to my collection of standard and various arcane tools used on cars of the British persuasion. Back then, a warranty was 12 months or 12,000 miles whichever came first. After that, you had to rely on the goodwill of the dealer. It was a simple time. English cars were still stuck in the stone age, but we just would not admit that out loud and just say, "But, they have personality and soul." But, when you have an MG-B in one bay and a new Datsun 240Z sitting next to it, you can't escape the obvious. You can see how the Japanese borrowed from car companies around the world taking the best concepts and making it better. However, I could write a book on the crazy stuff I saw with new Datsun cars and trucks right out of the factory. They had a problem with quality control and the work ethic at the time was, well, I can't explain it. Every new car had to have a pre-delivery inspection where everything had to be re-torqued. Then the cars had to be inspected and cleaned up. All sorts of artifacts would be found in various places. Sake bottles, mostly empty, but once I found a full one. Sake from Kyoto is the best. Japanese money, mostly pocket change. Chopsticks and half-eaten lunches were a common find. Occasionally, an official-looking document would be found with hand-written entries; we were not in the computer age. One night working on a shipment of newly delivered cars, I found a letter under the driver's seat when placing the floor mats. I had it translated by someone who served in China with the Flying Tigers and was proficient in Japanese. It was a 'Dear John' letter or more like 'Dear Yamada Taro' if you will. I told the boss that I needed to take that car in and go over it again. You never know what might be missed by some poor dude having a bad day. Two examples of why close inspections was necessary prior to sale. A Datsun 240Z, a rare automatic transmission model would not rev up past about 2/3rds of the tachometer. The owner must have read the manual and went easy on the car during the break-in. It turned out that the camshaft gear was machined out of alignment and when installed, the valve timing was retarded. The Z-car was gasping for air. One more. How about the replacement short block for a high milage Datsun Pickup? Yeah, bad day at the factory. After several days of trying to figure out what all the noise was, the engine came out and was torn down. The oil passageways in the crankshaft from the main bearing journals to the connecting rods were not drilled. That was not the only engine that had unfinished crankshafts. Only the ones that were fitted in new vehicles were found out at the factory. The rest of the bad engines were shipped to various locations worldwide waiting for some poor mechanic on flat-rate pay to get stuck. So, while domestic manufacturers sat on their hands and complained, the Japanese cars just got better and better. Anyway, about the warranty and buying an extended warranty coverage. A factory rep told me that the warranty offered is not out of the goodness of their hearts. The cost of that coverage is calculated by bean counters and is built into the price of each new car or truck. You paid for it. If they do the math correctly and don't have a massive recall, they make a profit. The Koreans got up to speed and started to turn out cars that rivaled the competition, but the stigma was there. The same stigma that the Japanese car makers worked past. The amazing warranties offered were in part an effort to get consumers to give them a chance. I can't say if they built the entire cost of coverage into the price, but maybe Kia or Hyundai ate some of that to keep the price competitive. Maybe someone knows the economics of this. Just counting the two Hondas, three Mazdas and maybe soon a second Subaru, each car has exceeded expectations and outlived the warranties with no wallet-busting events. The standard Subaru warranty should be enough to demonstrate that if it makes it through that period, the car should go the distance. The reality is that if Subaru offered warranties like 10 years or 100,000 miles, that cost has to be built into the price. This peace of mind is optional and for us to determine if it is a good value. I know one thing, if Subarus were built like the Datsuns of years ago; where do I sign up?
 

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I think it just comes down to the price for the plan you are looking for (shop around) and whether or not you want the peace of mind to pay now or risk it and pay later assuming you plan to keep your car past 3 Year’s.
I just purchased a gold plus plan for my wrx Since things get expensive quick with all the technology items and what not. The amount of miles I put (about 15k per year) I’d be out of warranty in just over 2 years. My wife didn’t get it on her outback and she got the SRVD disabled issue that’s gonna cost $600+ to fix.
The extended warranties pay for themselves in 1 or 2 large repairs. I like the fact that these are backed by Subaru and use OEM parts.
I’ll prolly look to get one for the ascent too.
 

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Just be aware that Subaru 100k warranty has been very pricey compared to other more complex higher cost vehicles in my experience. This is part of the dealer pricing. Having said that just recently a dealer offered 7/100 between $800-$900 which is where I have estimated it should run. As a side note I haven’t bought Extended warranty on my Subarus and the major issues were covered regardless given Subaru fixed faulty parts regardless of warranty status. Would I do no warranty with the Ascent Touring? Maybe but I need to see it first.
 

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A car with lots of new tech in it... I am open for discussion.
During extended warranty discussions, regardless of price, here's what I keep in mind.

We make incredibly reliable vehicles. But stuff can and does still happen. It's there for your peace of mind, just in case that bad thing DOES happen. Here in Oklahoma, it gets incredibly stupid hot and stays that way during the summer, causing stress on vehicle cooling and A/C systems. I've had my own Forester in twice, simply due to A/C issues that were due to the heat. Another issue we get here is that the sun coming in can and will cause the dash to get so hot that the radio sometimes doesn't work. Heck, I just had a new steering wheel put on the car because the heat destroyed the old one. (We know things like that happen down here - you ought to see the dashes on certain GM products that we take in trade. Every single one of them is cracked or broken.) And keep in mind, as I tell my own customers, I work at the dealership. That's WHY I got the extended warranty myself. I hope nothing does happen, but I want to be covered just in case it does.

Now, having said that, one other thing is that all the stores in our auto group except ours sell extended warranty coverage that's provided by a third party. The reason we sell our own (Subaru backed) added security is that it is better than the warranty our third party company provides. (And it's a LOT better than any other manufacturers extended warranty, too.)
 

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In the past, I didn't even consider extended service contracts (which is what these are, even though folks refer to them as "extended warranties") but that changed when so much tech became part of the content and my buying habits changed from new every three to four years to holding on for an extended period of time. One serious issue with a piece of expensive tech can pay for the extended service contract. But I also believe in only getting a manufacturer-backed contract, too...third party contracts are major risky and simple research will show major dissatisfaction with most of them.
 

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I'm interested in this as well! However, when would we even know what dealership prices will be offered?? Sparkland, I read your "You should expect to pay between $1500-2000 for the GOLD extended warranty"... but we won't know that till we go sign? New to this whole Subaru thing, let alone "ordering a car" business, so this is very interesting to me.
 

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However, when would we even know what dealership prices will be offered?? Sparkland, I read your "You should expect to pay between $1500-2000 for the GOLD extended warranty"... but we won't know that till we go sign? New to this whole Subaru thing,
Ever bought a new car of any brand before? It's not specifically a Subaru thing.

When you purchase a car and talk with me, I'm the front end salesman guy. I do NOT take your check. What I do is find you the right car for your needs and then we agree on the price for the car itself. (At our store, we're a trade difference store, so we talk strictly price. Four square stores the salesmen talk about payments, NOT the final price of the car.)

So we've gotten all our paperwork done, and now it's time for you to go to the dreaded back room, the F&I guys. (Finance and Insurance.) They're the ones who actually arrange your financing with Subaru (Chase) or whoever you finance through, or take the check, or whatever, as well as make sure the payments fit your budget if you're not writing a check. (And with 0% on several of our cars, why would you NOT finance those?) They're also the ones who will offer you protection items for your new car - the Resistal treatment of the seats, the GAP insurance to cover the difference between what you owe and what it's worth if you wreck the thing, the Windshield treatment that does nothing but will pay to replace broken eyesight windshields, and then the extended warranty coverage on car. Since the extended warranty does have variables involved (number of miles and years), that's pretty much not for us out front.

And just like the price of the car is negotiable, so too the price of the financial products can be negotiable. There's a certain bottom dollar those products do cost, so just keep that in mind.
 

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I didn't see it mentioned yet, maybe I missed it or maybe it's completely different? Our local dealer offers an unlimited mile lifetime warranty on all new Subaru purchases. Is this a dealer specific offer or do other Subaru dealers also offer this kind of warranty?
 

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I'm interested in this as well! However, when would we even know what dealership prices will be offered?? Sparkland, I read your "You should expect to pay between $1500-2000 for the GOLD extended warranty"... but we won't know that till we go sign? New to this whole Subaru thing, let alone "ordering a car" business, so this is very interesting to me.
Shop around. Easiest way would be to figure out whether you want the Classic or Gold Plus plan (we went with Gold Plus on our Outback since it's comparable to a bumper-to-bumper warranty), what length of coverage you want, and what deductible. Here's a page with the various plans and the list prices according to this dealer: https://www.planetsubaru.com/added-security-extended-warranty.htm. Call your salesman and ask what your dealership is pricing that plan/length/deductible at, then e-mail some other dealers, including ones out of state, and see what they're offering it for. Note there's a $295 surcharge added on the prices for a turbo, like the Ascent will have, so I'd make sure to specify the quote is for an Ascent and remind them it's got a turbo so they don't forget to include that in the amount they quote. Then buy from whoever offers you the best deal on the plan.

It's a Subaru plan so it doesn't matter which dealer sells it to you (although apparently CA and maybe a couple other states don't allow you to buy it out of state). In fact buying it out of state in our case meant we paid no sales tax on it either which saved us more. The only real downside to buying it from a different dealer would be you can't roll it into your loan, if that's what you had wanted to do. There's also no big rush because you can buy a plan at any point before the factory 3yr/36K warranty runs out. Whether you buy a 7yr/100K plan the same day you buy your car or you buy it 2.5 years later when you're at 30K miles, either way your car will still be covered under the plan until it's 7 years old or hits 100K miles.

We bought our plan on our Outback from Manchester Subaru in NH. Some other dealerships I saw mentions of from others on the forums that had good prices have been Joseph Subaru in KY, Subaru Stamford in CT, and Mastria Subaru in MA. If you're really inclined just start e-mailing a bunch of Subaru dealers from all over and see who can do the best price.
 

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Appreciate knowing it isn't needed at time of purchase, that you can negotiate, and that you can buy from any dealer. I figured that would be a standard cost, and would never have thought to negotiate (not my strength) or try a different dealership.
 

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Carl, do you know if Subaru will be offering 0% on the Ascent as well? I'm guessing probably not.
It may surprise people on here, but we don't know what interests rates will be until the 1st of the month when they're published. I've even had the argument with a customer before about lease rates changing on a month to month basis. because he was certain they were fixed for 3 month periods. Maybe with his bank they are - with us, they can and do change monthly.

So the answer to your question is simple. Nope, no clue, and not even going to guess. (But smart money says nope - no need for it. Not with all the pre-orders for July sold out already.)
 

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Shop around. Easiest way would be to figure out whether you want the Classic or Gold Plus plan (we went with Gold Plus on our Outback since it's comparable to a bumper-to-bumper warranty), what length of coverage you want, and what deductible. Here's a page with the various plans and the list prices according to this dealer: https://www.planetsubaru.com/added-security-extended-warranty.htm. Call your salesman and ask what your dealership is pricing that plan/length/deductible at, then e-mail some other dealers, including ones out of state, and see what they're offering it for. Note there's a $295 surcharge added on the prices for a turbo, like the Ascent will have, so I'd make sure to specify the quote is for an Ascent and remind them it's got a turbo so they don't forget to include that in the amount they quote. Then buy from whoever offers you the best deal on the plan.

It's a Subaru plan so it doesn't matter which dealer sells it to you (although apparently CA and maybe a couple other states don't allow you to buy it out of state). In fact buying it out of state in our case meant we paid no sales tax on it either which saved us more. The only real downside to buying it from a different dealer would be you can't roll it into your loan, if that's what you had wanted to do. There's also no big rush because you can buy a plan at any point before the factory 3yr/36K warranty runs out. Whether you buy a 7yr/100K plan the same day you buy your car or you buy it 2.5 years later when you're at 30K miles, either way your car will still be covered under the plan until it's 7 years old or hits 100K miles.

We bought our plan on our Outback from Manchester Subaru in NH. Some other dealerships I saw mentions of from others on the forums that had good prices have been Joseph Subaru in KY, Subaru Stamford in CT, and Mastria Subaru in MA. If you're really inclined just start e-mailing a bunch of Subaru dealers from all over and see who can do the best price.
THIS! Super helpful, thank you, thank you!
 

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I usually see 0% financing when they're trying to make room for next model year (MY) inventory. They usually apply to previous MY inventories. Right now I see 0% financing on 2018 models, especially when the 2019 models are starting production.
 

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I usually see 0% financing when they're trying to make room for next model year (MY) inventory. They usually apply to previous MY inventories. Right now I see 0% financing on 2018 models, especially when the 2019 models are starting production.
Its all about supply and demand. If they have more outbacks on the lots than they want, they want they will start to incentive them with cheaper financing. Rarely does Subaru ever do big "cash" incentives. They do lease incentives, but usually stay away from the cash discounts to preserve resale values.

Cars like the Crosstrek, WRX, STI, and now the Ascent won't see factory rates better than 2.9 for a long time.
 
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