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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did my first long drive in my new Subaru Ascent of almost 500 miles in the last couple of days. I experienced many of the features like Lane centering and Adaptive cruise control and found them to be awesome. At the same time, I wish to share couple of my experiences with these two features. Curious to hear from fellow Subaru users if they felt the same way + any tips.

Lane centering
When I went through those single lane highways(with barricades on the sides owing to road construction), I felt the car was trying to sharply turn the car to sides, even though lane markings were visible on either side of the road. I was going at 50-60mph and it felt like someone else was also holding the steering and turning randomly against my will. Maybe, the car was doing a its job, but I did not want to disbelieve my instincts. So, I turned off Lane centering in those kind of roads after I experienced this couple of times.


Adaptive Cruise control
If I do 2 quick speed increments of the cruising speed(say at 50mph), the car accelerates to 60mph at a breakneck speed. This aggressive acceleration sometimes scared fello passengers. I experienced the same behavior when I pass a car which had slowed down a fair bit.
 

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Hello vinodtr, I've made several cross country road trips in my 2020 Ascent Limited and had plenty of time to use and understand Adaptive Cruise Control and lane centering. The ACC is certainly a nice feature but it took a while for me to adjust to how it functions. While activated, increasing or decreasing speed using the steering wheel control is different for conventional cruise control systems. If you just toggle the switch up or down and immediately release the speed will adjust up or down in 5 mph increments accordingly. To make less aggressive speed changes, hold the toggle in the up or down position without releasing and watch the speed setting change as indicated in the dash display. This allows for very subtle mph changes (for example 1 mph at time) that won't alarm you or your passengers. This is an apparently little known function of the ACC that is clearly explained in the Owner's Manual.

Unfortunately, I can't help you with the lane centering feature through construction zones. I always turn off anything that doesn't allow me to be completely in control of the vehicle when driving through construction or work zones. Otherwise and I think the lane centering feature works very well and only applies subtle input should I drift to the edges of my lane.

Best, John
 

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I did my first long drive in my new Subaru Ascent of almost 500 miles in the last couple of days. I experienced many of the features like Lane centering and Adaptive cruise control and found them to be awesome. At the same time, I wish to share couple of my experiences with these two features. Curious to hear from fellow Subaru users if they felt the same way + any tips.

Lane centering
When I went through those single lane highways(with barricades on the sides owing to road construction), I felt the car was trying to sharply turn the car to sides, even though lane markings were visible on either side of the road. I was going at 50-60mph and it felt like someone else was also holding the steering and turning randomly against my will. Maybe, the car was doing a its job, but I did not want to disbelieve my instincts. So, I turned off Lane centering in those kind of roads after I experienced this couple of times.


Adaptive Cruise control
If I do 2 quick speed increments of the cruising speed(say at 50mph), the car accelerates to 60mph at a breakneck speed. This aggressive acceleration sometimes scared fello passengers. I experienced the same behavior when I pass a car which had slowed down a fair bit.
Hi vinodtr

Regarding the Adaptive Cruise Control, you can adjust the rate in which the ACC will accelerates. Your settings sound like they are in Dynamic mode. I can't remember where I saw the settings, but I think it is in infotainment system under Settings/Vehicle.

Hope that helps.
 

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Hi vinodtr

Regarding the Adaptive Cruise Control, you can adjust the rate in which the ACC will accelerates. Your settings sound like they are in Dynamic mode. I can't remember where I saw the settings, but I think it is in infotainment system under Settings/Vehicle.

Hope that helps.
Hello laufu, ACC is the default function for the cruise control but you can switch it off and use the conventional cruise function however the speed change function with the toggle switch is the same for both. I left out some of the detail but this is from my EyeSight Manual.

■Setting Conventional Cruise Control
(1) Setting Adaptive Cruise Control to standby status.
Press the (CRUISE) switch. At this time, (Adaptive Cruise Control indicator) (white) and the following distance setting indicator are displayed on the EyeSight display area of the combination meter display. The set vehicle speed display will read “- - MPH (- - - km/h)”.
When the (CRUISE) switch is pressed, the initial cruise control mode is always Adaptive Cruise Control.
If the (CRUISE) switch is pressed once more, the EyeSight display will turn off. It will also automatically turn off when the engine is stopped.
(2) Switch to Conventional Cruise Control.
Press and hold the / (Following distance setting) switch for approximately 2 seconds or longer to switch from Adaptive Cruise Control to Conventional Cruise Control.
A notification sounds 1 short beep.
At this time, the following distance setting indicator on the EyeSight display area of the combination meter display turns off and (Conventional Cruise Control indicator) (white) is displayed.

WARNING
• The “Obstacle Detected” warning will not activate while Conventional Cruise Control is functioning.
• When using Conventional Cruise Control, always set the speed according to the speed limit, traffic flow, road conditions, and other conditions.
CAUTION
During Conventional Cruise Control use, accelerator and brake control to follow the vehicle in front is not performed. Operate the accelerator and brake pedals as necessary.

To return to Adaptive Cruise Control use, cancel Conventional Cruise Control and then briefly press the / (Following distance setting) switch. A notification will sound (one short beep) when switching to Adaptive Cruise Control.
 

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... I felt the car was trying to sharply turn the car to sides, even though lane markings were visible on either side of the road. I was going at 50-60mph and it felt like someone else was also holding the steering and turning randomly against my will. Maybe, the car was doing a its job, but I did not want to disbelieve my instincts. So, I turned off Lane centering in those kind of roads after I experienced this couple of times.
I don't use lane centering in construction zones -- too many variables, changes, and potential for surprises. Some regular non-construction areas do have concrete barriers, and lane centering has been fine for me there.

One thing I've noted: Sometimes I "disagree" with where lane centering wants to put me in the lane. So I pressure the steering wheel a little to where I want to be. In this scenario, lane centering will apply pressure back, perfectly normal. But the amount of pressure can be a little unnerving, and the net situation feels like lane centering wants to turn me out of the lane! Not wanting to bump the wall or hit the vehicle next to me, I pressure the steering wheel more, or rather, hold it off to the side of where lane centering wants it. The fight can build, with lane centering applying more and more pressure against my hands' increasing leaning pressure/steering position.

With this fighting in mind, I tried leaning against lane centering on unpopulated freeway to see what was going on. Turns out, it's fine. Lane centering works until eyesight can't see a stripe or wall (in which case it turns off lane keeping/centering temporarily). When I pressure the wheel to one side or hold it left or right of where lane centering wants me to be (what it believes is centered, even if my eyes say a little differently), it WILL feel like if I give in and let go, lane centering will toss me out of the lane. In my clear-traffic experiments, it has not. Even if I totally let go, it moves me back to (what it thinks is) center, briskly, but without overshoot. Eh, maybe a little overshoot... which means that this disagreement/ leaning situation requires some awareness and decision-making.

What I now do is to never actually let go, but to allow lane centering to fight my "disagreement" by sliding the steering wheel under the friction of my fingers. This results in no brisk move by lane centering, just a settling into where it believes is center. And it doesn't feel like we're going to launch out off the lane.

Now, why would I "disagree" with eyesight's choice of centered? I don't like wall barriers, and it turns out that I tend to lean away from them, hopefully not at the detriment of spacing with the car next to me (but I'm quite aware of other cars and always try to give them room). I also lean away from big trucks, same considerations. All this may cause me to disagree with lane centering, and cause me to get into that situation of steering wheel pressure and fighting the centering, and feeling like if I let go it'll push me out of the lane.

These days, I turn off lane centering before these situations, or any time I feel like I'm starting to lean away from lane centering's center. It's as easy as tapping the brake pedal, or hitting the lane centering/keeping button or ACC button once.

Oh and I don't use lane centering if roads are wet or slippery, or if we have the roof loaded with heavy items - all situations where the car will handle less optimally, and where a sudden lane center correction (me letting go during the pressure build) might cause a loss of traction. I definitely don't use lane centering when towing.

F.S.
 

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Lane Centering, Lane Keep Assist and Adaptive Cruise Control are not designed to be used in construction zones, and are not supposed to be used there. So, other than to not use it as per Subaru's instructions, there's not much more help you will find on this. Computers are not smart enough yet to figure out road cones with a variety of lines, which also means they'll have problems determining which is the follow/lead vehicle, since they won't be sure what lane the cars in front of yours are actually in.

For everyone's reference, here's the 2021 Subaru Ascent Eyesight Manual.

Here's a snippet from the Lane Centering Function instructions (Lane Keep and Adaptive Cruise Control have similar wording):
Lane Centering Function is designed for use on expressways, freeways, toll roads, interstate highways and similar limited access roads. It is not intended to be used in city traffic. In the following conditions, do not use Lane Centering Function. Doing so may result in an accident.
  • Ordinary roads (roads other than those mentioned above) Depending on the driving environment (complexity of roads and other factors), the system may not be able to perform as the traffic conditions require, and that may result in an accident.
    • Roads with sharp corners
    • Roads with lane restrictions or tentative lanes due to construction work, etc.
    • Old lane markings remain.
    • Avoiding parked vehicles
 

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Hello laufu, ACC is the default function for the cruise control but you can switch it off and use the conventional cruise function however the speed change function with the toggle switch is the same for both. I left out some of the detail but this is from my EyeSight Manual.
Hi John F, That is correct. I thought vinodtr was referring to the rapid acceleration characteristics when ACC is set to Dynamic mode and not the change of speed using the +/- rocker on the steering wheel. If ACC is in Dynamic mode, acceleration is "brisk" (i.e. full-tilt boogie!) to move you to your set distance from the car in front of you or the set speed.

On the other end of the spectrum when ACC is set to ECON, you wonder if the turbo is even working plus you are allowing anybody on the left or right lanes to jump in front of you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hello vinodtr, I've made several cross country road trips in my 2020 Ascent Limited and had plenty of time to use and understand Adaptive Cruise Control and lane centering. The ACC is certainly a nice feature but it took a while for me to adjust to how it functions. While activated, increasing or decreasing speed using the steering wheel control is different for conventional cruise control systems. If you just toggle the switch up or down and immediately release the speed will adjust up or down in 5 mph increments accordingly. To make less aggressive speed changes, hold the toggle in the up or down position without releasing and watch the speed setting change as indicated in the dash display. This allows for very subtle mph changes (for example 1 mph at time) that won't alarm you or your passengers. This is an apparently little known function of the ACC that is clearly explained in the Owner's Manual.

Unfortunately, I can't help you with the lane centering feature through construction zones. I always turn off anything that doesn't allow me to be completely in control of the vehicle when driving through construction or work zones. Otherwise and I think the lane centering feature works very well and only applies subtle input should I drift to the edges of my lane.

Best, John
Thanks John. Your experience is exactly I wanted to convey. Happy to know my experience is not an odd one. Thanks for your tips !
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hi John F, That is correct. I thought vinodtr was referring to the rapid acceleration characteristics when ACC is set to Dynamic mode and not the change of speed using the +/- rocker on the steering wheel. If ACC is in Dynamic mode, acceleration is "brisk" (i.e. full-tilt boogie!) to move you to your set distance from the car in front of you or the set speed.

On the other end of the spectrum when ACC is set to ECON, you wonder if the turbo is even working plus you are allowing anybody on the left or right lanes to jump in front of you.
Thanks @laufu for that tip. I found the ACC characteristics setting on the console settings(behind the steering wheel). It was set to Standard. Other options were Dynamic, Eco and Comfort. I set it to Comfort for now. I will test that and land on something that I like !
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I don't use lane centering in construction zones -- too many variables, changes, and potential for surprises. Some regular non-construction areas do have concrete barriers, and lane centering has been fine for me there.

One thing I've noted: Sometimes I "disagree" with where lane centering wants to put me in the lane. So I pressure the steering wheel a little to where I want to be. In this scenario, lane centering will apply pressure back, perfectly normal. But the amount of pressure can be a little unnerving, and the net situation feels like lane centering wants to turn me out of the lane! Not wanting to bump the wall or hit the vehicle next to me, I pressure the steering wheel more, or rather, hold it off to the side of where lane centering wants it. The fight can build, with lane centering applying more and more pressure against my hands' increasing leaning pressure/steering position.

With this fighting in mind, I tried leaning against lane centering on unpopulated freeway to see what was going on. Turns out, it's fine. Lane centering works until eyesight can't see a stripe or wall (in which case it turns off lane keeping/centering temporarily). When I pressure the wheel to one side or hold it left or right of where lane centering wants me to be (what it believes is centered, even if my eyes say a little differently), it WILL feel like if I give in and let go, lane centering will toss me out of the lane. In my clear-traffic experiments, it has not. Even if I totally let go, it moves me back to (what it thinks is) center, briskly, but without overshoot. Eh, maybe a little overshoot... which means that this disagreement/ leaning situation requires some awareness and decision-making.

What I now do is to never actually let go, but to allow lane centering to fight my "disagreement" by sliding the steering wheel under the friction of my fingers. This results in no brisk move by lane centering, just a settling into where it believes is center. And it doesn't feel like we're going to launch out off the lane.

Now, why would I "disagree" with eyesight's choice of centered? I don't like wall barriers, and it turns out that I tend to lean away from them, hopefully not at the detriment of spacing with the car next to me (but I'm quite aware of other cars and always try to give them room). I also lean away from big trucks, same considerations. All this may cause me to disagree with lane centering, and cause me to get into that situation of steering wheel pressure and fighting the centering, and feeling like if I let go it'll push me out of the lane.

These days, I turn off lane centering before these situations, or any time I feel like I'm starting to lean away from lane centering's center. It's as easy as tapping the brake pedal, or hitting the lane centering/keeping button or ACC button once.

Oh and I don't use lane centering if roads are wet or slippery, or if we have the roof loaded with heavy items - all situations where the car will handle less optimally, and where a sudden lane center correction (me letting go during the pressure build) might cause a loss of traction. I definitely don't use lane centering when towing.

F.S.
Thanks, FirstSubie ! Very helpful reply !
 

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I got curious so I took a look at the description for each mode
I was wondering the same thing. Thanks for posting the information. On my next extended road trip I'll try each mode for the actual behavior differences.
 

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Hi vinodtr

Regarding the Adaptive Cruise Control, you can adjust the rate in which the ACC will accelerates. Your settings sound like they are in Dynamic mode. I can't remember where I saw the settings, but I think it is in infotainment system under Settings/Vehicle.

Hope that helps.
I have mine set to ECO mode, otherwise known as "mosey mode". It's a manageable acceleration.
 

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I did my first long drive in my new Subaru Ascent of almost 500 miles in the last couple of days. I experienced many of the features like Lane centering and Adaptive cruise control and found them to be awesome. At the same time, I wish to share couple of my experiences with these two features. Curious to hear from fellow Subaru users if they felt the same way + any tips.

Lane centering
When I went through those single lane highways(with barricades on the sides owing to road construction), I felt the car was trying to sharply turn the car to sides, even though lane markings were visible on either side of the road. I was going at 50-60mph and it felt like someone else was also holding the steering and turning randomly against my will. Maybe, the car was doing a its job, but I did not want to disbelieve my instincts. So, I turned off Lane centering in those kind of roads after I experienced this couple of times.


Adaptive Cruise control
If I do 2 quick speed increments of the cruising speed(say at 50mph), the car accelerates to 60mph at a breakneck speed. This aggressive acceleration sometimes scared fello passengers. I experienced the same behavior when I pass a car which had slowed down a fair bit.
Anytime I’m around highway construction, the centering option can be a concern. My guess is it is reading the irregularities in the road. Best to just turn it off during these sections of road.
 

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And I just set mine to Dynamic. Too risky? 😁
The first time I tried ACC was in a loaner Forester while my Tribeca was getting service. ACC was doing its thing following a car in the right lane. I had the ACC set to 75 but the car in front was only traveling about 65ish. My exit came up and I proceeded to enter the exit lane, a short exit lane... You could imagine my surprise when the Forester suddenly accelerated back toward 75 while I was about to enter an off ramp with a 20mph speed limit.

After that, I have my ACC set to Comfort for the Ascent and Legacy.
 
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