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Wow, that's sad to see - if you're on here, just remember you need to air down. Hit me up for tips for next time. The Ascent breezes through that stuff (as does the Baja and Forester).

 

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Know and plan for risks, or do not take them.
This is a tough one. There's a ton of people who say it's not worth it and changes nothing with "smaller" tires like ours. They're very wrong, but, nonetheless, I've met a bunch of people who've made the mistake in sand because of it. Sadly.
 

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This is a tough one. There's a ton of people who say it's not worth it and changes nothing with "smaller" tires like ours. They're very wrong, but, nonetheless, I've met a bunch of people who've made the mistake in sand because of it. Sadly.
Just curious, why is it that airing down tires helps with traction in the sand. Does it increase the surface area of tire making contact with the sand, or ? Seems interesting that the general rule of more inflation = greater traction on most surfaces is the opposite when it comes to sand.
 

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Just curious, why is it that airing down tires helps with traction in the sand. Does it increase the surface area of tire making contact with the sand, or ? Seems interesting that the general rule of more inflation = greater traction on most surfaces is the opposite when it comes to sand.
It's not the traction, which is something I didn't know for a couple of years. Inflated tires push sand in front of them that they dig up, creating an ever increasing berm that the car eventually can't overcome. When they're aired down, they roll/fold over the sand in front of them.

There isn't a Jeep, truck, Subie, etc, I haven't seen get stuck in fine sand when fully aired up. And "send it" isn't the answer - that's brutal on the drivetrain.

This isn't the vid I was trying to find, but it's a good one that explains it...
 

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now that we're fully off topic...
in addition to what robert said, more surface area of the tire is on the ground when deflated so the weight is distributed more, so you sink less. Which is also why you push less sand in front of the tires when its deflated.
 

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How much can you air down the OEM 20"s that guy had before you damage the sidewalls?

Also, that guy in the truck said he aired down to 15 PSI, but they didn't look that low to me; I guess it could just be the angles or something being shown.
 

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It's not the traction, which is something I didn't know for a couple of years. Inflated tires push sand in front of them that they dig up, creating an ever increasing berm that the car eventually can't overcome. When they're aired down, they roll/fold over the sand in front of them.

There isn't a Jeep, truck, Subie, etc, I haven't seen get stuck in fine sand when fully aired up. And "send it" isn't the answer - that's brutal on the drivetrain.

This isn't the vid I was trying to find, but it's a good one that explains it...
Thanks, Robert!
 

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How much can you air down the OEM 20"s that guy had before you damage the sidewalls?

Also, that guy in the truck said he aired down to 15 PSI, but they didn't look that low to me; I guess it could just be the angles or something being shown.
I think people who've done the Outerbanks and other places have done 20-24 psi safely. I'd take turns slower on the stock 20's, due to the shorter sidewalls, so you don't roll the bead off the wheel, but, otherwise, people have done very well all over the place on the stock 20's.
 

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2018 Subaru Outback Limited 3.6R, 2003 Honda Pilot EX
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I think people who've done the Outerbanks and other places have done 20-24 psi safely. I'd take turns slower on the stock 20's, due to the shorter sidewalls, so you don't roll the bead off the wheel, but, otherwise, people have done very well all over the place on the stock 20's.
Thx Robert,
So for the stock 20" wheels/tires , use between 20 and 24psi. In my pre-purchase review of tire pressures for the Ascent I have noticed the tire pressure is the same front/back.
What about 18" wheels on an 2018 Outback? What would you air those down to and the Gen5 outback have different tire pressures for front vs back?
 

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Thx Robert,
So for the stock 20" wheels/tires , use between 20 and 24psi. In my pre-purchase review of tire pressures for the Ascent I have noticed the tire pressure is the same front/back.
What about 18" wheels on an 2018 Outback? What would you air those down to and the Gen5 outback have different tire pressures for front vs back?
Which tires are you running?

In both cases, all terrains are better, of course... and in the case of the Ascent, virtually anything is better for off-road than the stock tires. ;)
 

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Which tires are you running?

In both cases, all terrains are better, of course... and in the case of the Ascent, virtually anything is better for off-road than the stock tires. ;)
sure - but if you're running stock tires on an Outback 3.6R limited and you venture on to a beach, what should you air down to?
 

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sure - but if you're running stock tires on an Outback 3.6R limited and you venture on to a beach, what should you air down to?
lol, that was the question ("which tires..." (on the Outback)). Sorry, I don't know which came on the 2018. I'd probably start at 23ish?
 

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