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I just purchased the Ascent Limited for my family of six, and am loving it so far. The primary factor for me was safety.

We're coming from a 2015 Ford F150 Crew Cab, which also has excellent safety scores. But with our fourth child on the way, we needed a third row.

Moving from a truck that sits high and has tons of cabin room, naturally I don't feel as safe in the Ascent. And here in Texas, there are a lot of trucks and large SUVs (e.g. Expeditions) on the road. So obviously an accident involving one is more likely.

With that said, I'm trying to assess all safety aspects of the Ascent. Here's what I know so far:

- Flawless NHTSA ratings, with the exception of rollover. On rollover, it still gets four stars at 17% resistance and aligns with most SUVs. The only SUV to get five star rollover is the Tesla Model X which is double the price and doesn't offer enough passenger space.
- Flawless IIHS ratings, including an impressive roof strength to weight ratio of 4.8.
- Vehicles built with the Subaru Global Platform (SGP) are getting record safety ratings from the Japan New Car Assessment Program (JNCAP), so we can expect the same from the Ascent.
- Subaru is one of the only manufacturers (maybe the only) that has tested for third row passenger safety. Third row curtain airbags are standard, which surprisingly, isn't common.

Here's what I would like to know, which is the reason for this post:

- Do we have any information on the third row safety tests? I'd really like to know some specifics. If a truck hits us from behind, what is a reasonable speed differential at which we can expect the third row to remain intact? 20mph? 40mph?
- How would an Ascent fare against an Expedition in a head on collision? How about when being hit from the side by one? Again, looking for some speed estimates to predict survivability. I did read on one site that supposedly a WRX built with the SGP platform has high survivability in a crash with a large SUV, which would indicate the Ascent is even more favorable, but no sources were provided to back that statement up, so no idea how credible it is.
 

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I'm not aware of any such metrics that get published as far as safety goes, but judging by the safety ratings that have been publish, the Ascent will provide a higher rate of survivability than any other SUV in its class.

Edit: Also the WRX is not built on the global platform yet. Next redesign it will get the new platform. That is coming in 2021 or 2022.
 

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SafetyFreak;68823 said
- How would an Ascent fare against an Expedition in a head on collision? How about when being hit from the side by one? Again, looking for some speed estimates to predict survivability.
A head on crash of anything into anything will be bad. However, Subaru brags that it has a 0 per million fatality rate. The Ascent has been called an "airbag on wheels". In addition, the Eyesight system is probably the best around for avoiding crashes that can be avoided.
After watching the IIHS crash tests on Utube I'd rather be in an Ascent than anything else. IIHS crashes vehicles into fixed barriers at 40(?) mph. Let's not forget, though that two vehicles hitting head on at 60mph is the same as a 120 mph crash into a fixed barrier.
There is always risk in life.
 

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After watching the IIHS crash tests on Utube I'd rather be in an Ascent than anything else. IIHS crashes vehicles into fixed barriers at 40(?) mph. Let's not forget, though that two vehicles hitting head on at 60mph is the same as a 120 mph crash into a fixed barrier.
There is always risk in life.
You would think that 60mph would double to 120 in a head on crash. But it simply does not. Force= Mass*Acceleration.

Two objects hitting each other head on at 60 mph hitting another object at 60mph can only transfer the force to each other. The 1st car transfers the force to the 2nd car. The second car transfer the energy to the first. The damage would only be slightly more then one car hitting a brick wall.

Hitting a standing object delivers the all the enegy back to the first object because the mass of the second object can not be moved with the force applied to it.

In both cases, it is simply a mass and acceleration needed to stop the on coming car. In two cars hitting each other, deliver enough force to stop each other. The brick wall has soo much mass, the car takes most of the force to stop itself.

You can ask yourself this. If you have two pullies with a rope tied to two 1 pound weights. Each are pulling each other with 1 pound of force. The only difference is they are pulling away from each other not towards each other. It still takes 1lb to balance them. If the logic the force doubles, then it would take 2 lbs to pull 1 lb on the other side.

It hurts the brains, but it is true.
 

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For those wondering, the Ascent is STILL Number 1 (it only dropped at one point due to LED headlights not being standard on all trims - something Subaru rectified).

IIHS does not publicly assign numerical rankings, but, their computer system's algorithms most definitely rank the vehicles. Their listings are put in order of highest to lowest ranked.


11275
 

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For those wondering, the Ascent is STILL Number 1 (it only dropped at one point due to LED headlights not being standard on all trims - something Subaru rectified).

IIHS does not publicly assign numerical rankings, but, their computer system's algorithms most definitely rank the vehicles. Their listings are put in order of highest to lowest ranked.


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safety is always paramount
 

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ugh, tiktok inception. getting tiktok videos from Ascent forum disguised as twitter posts :s
 

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ugh, tiktok inception. getting tiktok videos from Ascent forum disguised as twitter posts :s
I have no social media presence (this forum is as close as I get). I came across the tik tok / tweet (whatever it was) in a news article on legislation requiring test dummies to include female test dummies. Since my teenager son occasionally takes me for a drive, I felt somewhat aligned with the character.
 

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This is an old thread but I think the intent @SafetyFreak's question has was the relative protection of a smaller lighter vehicle in an accident compared to a larger heavier vehicle. The good news is the Ascent is pretty darn large. I have asked and thought about how the safety ratings relate between classes. I.E. are you safer in a 5 star rated compact car or a 4 star rated midsize? It's never that black and white but all my research so far has lead me to believe that the larger heavier vehicle has an advantage in collisions.

Would a 2015 F150 be safer than an Ascent? I doubt it only because I think the F150 didn't have great crash ratings until 2017 and is not that much heavier.
 
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