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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After seeing this

https://youtu.be/bR8RrmEizVg

Decided to purchase a RFID pouch to keep my keys since it’s our weekend vehicle parked outside.


But it doesn’t work on the Subaru Ascent fob, only my Toyota and Lexus ones. It doesn’t even make it weaker because my approach LEDs still turn on

Any clue why? I figured it would block all types of signals. I understand some frequencies penetrate materials better, so if someone has had good results with a pouch please share!
 

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Check out the instructions. That one requires that you put the FOB in between the correct layers, or it does nothing.

Failing that (some are bad quality), I posted a link to one that I know works. If that doesn't work for you, let me know and I will dig up the link to the one I've personally tested.

After seeing this

https://youtu.be/bR8RrmEizVg

Decided to purchase a RFID pouch to keep my keys since it’s our weekend vehicle parked outside.


But it doesn’t work on the Subaru Ascent fob, only my Toyota and Lexus ones. It doesn’t even make it weaker because my approach LEDs still turn on

Any clue why? I figured it would block all types of signals. I understand some frequencies penetrate materials better, so if someone has had good results with a pouch please share!
 

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Good news or bad news?

Bad news first. Nothing is going to stop them from taking your car if they really want to. You just have to make it very hard. So, get a shield, if it makes you feel better. But the wifi system would be an easier attack, see below.

Good news. No reason to worry about it with cars made in the last few years. Here is why.
1.) Car makers stopped using rolling authorization codes. The fact that they used them at one point shows just how you can not trust your car. The car you saw used a rolling code, literally the fob would say, 101, and the car would accept 102 to open and start. As long as your fob said the next number, 103 ect, the car accepted that the key was near.

2.) The key must be in the car to drive it. Before, the same code to unlock and start the car would allow the car to be put into drive. But now, they require a different code to put the car into drive.

3.) One time use codes are now used. Every thousands codes or so, your fob and car agree on the next thousand codes usually whole you are driving. The attacker would have to get the one time pad, find which part you are at, then issue the attack. And they would have to do this for both you opening the door and you starting your car remotely. Possible but not likely.

4.) Basic encryption is used now, so not only they would have to get the one time code sheet, but they would also have to crack the encryption.

5.)Playing the newer fobs and car, I have found that one invalid key input will set off the alarm. Subaru has agreed to the security standards that allow this feature.

https://electronics.howstuffworks.com/gadgets/automotive/unlock-car-door-remote1.htm

Article backing up what I am saying.

Anyone that wants to geek out on it.

 

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Yep. I use the FOB pouch not for security, but so that I can (a) hide the FOB inside the car at the beach, and (b) keep them from talking to the car and each other all night long when I'm asleep, thus conserving battery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Good news or bad news?

Bad news first. Nothing is going to stop them from taking your car if they really want to. You just have to make it very hard. So, get a shield, if it makes you feel better. But the wifi system would be an easier attack, see below.

Good news. No reason to worry about it with cars made in the last few years. Here is why.
1.) Car makers stopped using rolling authorization codes. The fact that they used them at one point shows just how you can not trust your car. The car you saw used a rolling code, literally the fob would say, 101, and the car would accept 102 to open and start. As long as your fob said the next number, 103 ect, the car accepted that the key was near.

2.) The key must be in the car to drive it. Before, the same code to unlock and start the car would allow the car to be put into drive. But now, they require a different code to put the car into drive.

3.) One time use codes are now used. Every thousands codes or so, your fob and car agree on the next thousand codes usually whole you are driving. The attacker would have to get the one time pad, find which part you are at, then issue the attack. And they would have to do this for both you opening the door and you starting your car remotely. Possible but not likely.

4.) Basic encryption is used now, so not only they would have to get the one time code sheet, but they would also have to crack the encryption.

5.)Playing the newer fobs and car, I have found that one invalid key input will set off the alarm. Subaru has agreed to the security standards that allow this feature.

https://electronics.howstuffworks.com/gadgets/automotive/unlock-car-door-remote1.htm

Article backing up what I am saying.

Anyone that wants to geek out on it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkTlTCUeec0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3bISk5t8cA
Yup, as much deterrent as possible is the best course of action for me. Great info! Thanks
 

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Yep. I use the FOB pouch not for security, but so that I can (a) hide the FOB inside the car at the beach, and (b) keep them from talking to the car and each other all night long when I'm asleep, thus conserving battery.
How to lock the car if you leave FOB inside the car ? How to open the door when in the next day morning ?
 

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Yep. I use the FOB pouch not for security, but so that I can (a) hide the FOB inside the car at the beach, and (b) keep them from talking to the car and each other all night long when I'm asleep, thus conserving battery.
How to lock the car if you leave FOB inside the car ? How to open the door when in the next day morning ?
My phone is waterproof. ?

You can also program a code. There's a secret button on the lift gate.
 

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My phone is waterproof. ?

You can also program a code. There's a secret button on the lift gate.
Thank you, Robert. Where and How to operate a secret button on the lift gate ?
I wish I knew. ?

There's instructions someplace in the forums, but I am not at a computer right now and can't find them.

I think it's the same as for the 2018 Outback, and Subaru made a video that you can find on YouTube. Groove Subaru did as well I think.

Let me know if you can't find it, and I will dig it up when I get back to a computer.
 

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Good news or bad news?

Bad news first. Nothing is going to stop them from taking your car if they really want to. You just have to make it very hard. So, get a shield, if it makes you feel better. But the wifi system would be an easier attack, see below.

Good news. No reason to worry about it with cars made in the last few years. Here is why.
1.) Car makers stopped using rolling authorization codes. The fact that they used them at one point shows just how you can not trust your car. The car you saw used a rolling code, literally the fob would say, 101, and the car would accept 102 to open and start. As long as your fob said the next number, 103 ect, the car accepted that the key was near.

2.) The key must be in the car to drive it. Before, the same code to unlock and start the car would allow the car to be put into drive. But now, they require a different code to put the car into drive.

3.) One time use codes are now used. Every thousands codes or so, your fob and car agree on the next thousand codes usually whole you are driving. The attacker would have to get the one time pad, find which part you are at, then issue the attack. And they would have to do this for both you opening the door and you starting your car remotely. Possible but not likely.

4.) Basic encryption is used now, so not only they would have to get the one time code sheet, but they would also have to crack the encryption.

5.)Playing the newer fobs and car, I have found that one invalid key input will set off the alarm. Subaru has agreed to the security standards that allow this feature.

https://electronics.howstuffworks.com/gadgets/automotive/unlock-car-door-remote1.htm

Article backing up what I am saying.

Anyone that wants to geek out on it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkTlTCUeec0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3bISk5t8cA
Yes, that is what I heard too. I asked my Subaru dealer about it. He told me don't worry about that at all. The issue was little bit old and affected premium vehicles like Lexus ( The probably adopted the technology early). Subaru uses new technology and don't need to be worried.
 

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I wish I knew. ?

There's instructions someplace in the forums, but I am not at a computer right now and can't find them.

I think it's the same as for the 2018 Outback, and Subaru made a video that you can find on YouTube. Groove Subaru did as well I think.

Let me know if you can't find it, and I will dig it up when I get back to a computer.
See page 127 of the Ascent Owners Manual.
 
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