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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For the first time in my life I was careless when changing over my tires, and didn't torque the final wheel. Doh! I'm usually very careful with these things, but was distracted at the end.

After about 500 miles on a trip back from a rafting trip hauling our trailer with the gear noticed a shimmy and some noise. Pulled over and the 4 lugs were loose to the fingers and one stud broke off.

I was next to a discount tire, so had then retorque it. No problem getting home, quiet after that.

Ordered the stud (OEM) from amazon ($5/ea). There is plenty of room on the rear to lightly hit the stud out and get the new one in. No additional dissassembly needed beyond removing the caliper (2 bolts) and the caliper comes right off then.

Used a stack of washers and the lug nut to pull the knurled stud in to the hole. A 2nd stud was buggered so I'll replace that one as well (should have bought a spare!).

Tom
 

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I had to replace a front wheel stud in a 2008 Honda CR-V I once owned. There was just barely not enough room behind it...on the knuckle...to get the stud out. Service instructions said to remove the wheel bearing assembly and do it off the car. Yeah, right. So out came the grinder, to make room for the stud to come out.

In my experience with Hondas, they're usually pretty easy to service and maintain, but that was a curious miss to me.

I'm glad to hear this is easy on the Ascent...at least on the rear!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, I was very happy when I got the rotor off and saw the clearance back there. I was prepared to have to pull the whole hub and was very happy I didn't have to!
 

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Yes, I was very happy when I got the rotor off and saw the clearance back there. I was prepared to have to pull the whole hub and was very happy I didn't have to!
I noticed how easy it was to remove the rear rotors when I was painting my calipers. One of the perks of having an electric parking brake is not having a drum brake in the rear!
 

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OMG thank you for this post! I seemed to have put my when locks on wrong when I last rotated my tires and royally screwed up the studs. My dealership wanted $500 to replace them. I was apprehensive about doing it myself, but you've put my mind at ease.
 

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Hope it went smooth for you caramesc!
Like you said, easy-peasy!
I'm throwing pictures in for anyone else who might need to do it.

Wheel off.
Semi-pro tip: turn the wheel fully toward the opposite side of the car to make it easier to get to the back.
5155


Remove the 12mm bolt holding the brake line. This is optional, but it gives you a little more range moving the caliper.
5156


Remove the plastic caps from the caliper guide pins
5157


Now this annoyed me. Every car I've worked on used a regular bolt for the caliper pins, but the Ascent uses an 11mm (I think) hex socket. The closest I had was a 10mm allen wrench, which worked.
5159


Remove the brake hardware. This was probably the most difficult part. I just went at it with a screwdriver and it eventually popped off.
5161


Don't let the caliper hang by the brake line. You can bungee it up, or just sit it on something.
5162


Remove the two 17mm bolts
5163


Remove the brake rotor
5172


Here's the damaged lug
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Now I wasn't thrilled about just whacking the lugs with a mallet, afraid I might mess up the alignment or something. I used a Harbor Freight Ball Joint Separator. Just tighten it up with a 3/4" (or 19mm) wrench, and the lug pops right out.
5166
 

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The gap fits nicely over the rear of the lug. Make sure the fork is not sitting on the lug.
5167


Semi-pro tip: To stop the wheel from rotating while using the wrench, I just wedged a 2x4 underneath. Tighten slowly! The lug will shoot out the rear once you've tightened enough!
5168


Lug's out!
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Put the lug in from the rear and either use a stack of washers on the outside, or a stud installer. Just put a lug nut on and tighten until the lug bolt is fully in.
Semi-pro tip: I put the new lug in the freezer for a few hours. This temporarily contracts the metal and makes it slightly easier to pull in (theoretically).
5170


Done!
5171


Then just put everything back on.
 

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Subaru wheel studs seem to be excessively prone to damage. We have never had problems with them any other brand of vehicle (Honda, Toyota, Hyundai). Both times we had problems, the lug nuts were removed by the tire shop (Discount Tire), when we purchased new tires. We became aware of the damage when we rotated the tires in our garage.
 

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Things are a little different for the rear wheels.

There's 2 additional lines going into the caliper. The lower one is for the parking brake and is connected by an electrical harness (red arrow). If you don't want to unplug it, there are 2x 12mm bolts on the underside (blue arrow) that will give you a little more room to pull the caliper away. I'm not sure what the top wire is (green arrow).
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5210


The caliper bolt is 7mm, not 11mm like the front.
Behind the hub is a little more tight fitting than the front wheel. Position the bolt toward the rear of the car (3:00 for the left wheel, 9:00 for the right wheel) and there's room to work with. There is a small lip on the back of this hub that is not present on the front wheels, so be mindful if using the ball joint separator from my previous post.
5211

5212


5213
 

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Sadly my go to @Discount Tire location has a habit of breaking studs...

I've gotten quite adept at swapping studs out on my Forester.

As long as you are physically able, it doesn't take that long.

C

- Notes in system to use hand tools, sometimes they forget.... Along with the lower torque ratings.
 
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