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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Car was in garage, in park, with the parking brake on.

Battery 100% dead.

I know how to move to neutral, removing the small plug by the shifter and sticking a screw driver down in there.

I could not figure out how to release the parking brake.

Thanks!

Tom
 

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Hi Tom, the easiest thing is to borrow a portable jumpstarter - if you can't open the hood, then I'd use one that can plug into the cigarette lighter - don't try starting the car with it (you'll probably blow the fuse instead of starting), but you should be able to disengage the parking brake.

There's NO easy way of doing it manually. In the tech instructions, there are instructions that involve unscrewing the assemblies and disconnecting the power. It's not the type of thing I'd try.
 

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2019 Subaru Ascent Limited 2010 Subaru Legacy GT limited
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It should be in the owner's manual along with any pertinent warnings about any damage manually releasing the brake may cause. I am not sure on this model of Ebrake if damage is a concern, on my 2010 legacy the manual release of the brake will damage the servo and require replacement or reprogramming.

Page 343-345 in the OM: contact the dealer if the parking brake cannot be disengaged as manually disengaging the motors may damage them.
 

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It should be in the owner's manual along with any pertinent warnings about any damage manually releasing the brake may cause.
That's exactly where I thought I originally saw the instructions, but, all I can find is "contact a Subaru authorized Service Center" (paraphrased).
 

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I'm with you on that one. I still don't know what problem it solves or what convenience it improves.
On my legacy it doubled as a hill-hold feature, there is some convenience in the auto-release programming to keep those keen individuals from driving around with a parking brake engaged because they forgot to disengage it. I suppose it also serves as a convenience, pushing or pulling on a manual lever vs a button push and no need to guess the tension level manually, the servo will always tension the same, assuming it isn't damaged or broken.


I also can't say I miss that big ugly lever in the middle of my console or the extra pedal where my dead pedal is now in my legacy. Overall the EPB is a nice upgrade for a daily driver vs a manual lever.
 

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I’m only guessing but maybe they didn’t include a way to disengage it with a dead battery because you can’t drive with a dead battery. Yes, it makes it diffcult to push to a convenient location but how often is that necessary?

I'm with you on that one. I still don't know what problem it solves or what convenience it improves.
If it were to engage automatically each time you park it would solve the problem of 99.99999999999999% of people not engaging their parking brake when they park.
 

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I’m only guessing but maybe they didn’t include a way to disengage it with a dead battery because you can’t drive with a dead battery. Yes, it makes it diffcult to push to a convenient location but how often is that necessary?


If it were to engage automatically each time you park it would solve the problem of 99.99999999999999% of people not engaging their parking brake when they park.
If they really wanted to "solve" that issue, why would you need to separately lift the e-brake? Just automatically engage the e-brake when shifting into park. I seem to remember fixing this feature on 60's and 70's Caddy's and Olds. Luxury car owners couldn't possibly have pressed that extra pedal manually, could they?
 

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If they really wanted to "solve" that issue, why would you need to separately lift the e-brake? Just automatically engage the e-brake when shifting into park.
that’s what’s funny about ours. Sometimes it automatically engages, other times it doesn’t. Either way it is physically easier to do with the switch.
 

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If they really wanted to "solve" that issue, why would you need to separately lift the e-brake?
Possibly, because doing it properly, would require a little more work than just that. The car would need to hydraulically slam the brakes, hold them, engage the e-brake, wait for the servos to finish, then let go of the hydraulic brakes.

that’s what’s funny about ours. Sometimes it automatically engages, other times it doesn’t.
IIRC, if AVH is on and active when you shift into Park, the car will then engage the e-brake. It will also do this after ten minutes (if memory serves) of AVH on and being active (switches from AVH to parking brake).

To tie these thoughts together and come full circle:
With the new electronic booster system, I think we may finally see automatic parking brakes on future Subarus. It will allow for proper "foot brake" use/hand-off by the computer when parked, to allow it to properly spin out the e-brake servo before releasing the "foot brake". Maybe. Time will tell.
 

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The electric parking brake: the answer to a question nobody was asking.
I'm with you on that one. I still don't know what problem it solves or what convenience it improves.
Runaway vehicles, from people who don't pull the lever or stomp the ratcheted pedal hard enough. For instance, my mother doesn't stomp her 2003 Camry's pedal to the floor enough, so, if you put her car in neutral on a slight incline, like her driveway, it will roll slowly to the bottom. It takes a bit of effort to stomp it to the floor, because it's a simple mechanical design.

My 2010 Outback was the lever design, and it required yanking the handle all the way up to be useful on hills.

The Subaru EPB system keep calibrating for required force to properly lock the pads onto the rotors to prevent it.

How big of a problem was it? I don't know. Here, probably not much at all. Some places like California (eg: especially San Fran) or in the Adirondacks, probably a decent problem. Heck, there's actually laws in various states assigning blame to the vehicle owner who didn't properly use or maintain their parking brakes, and cause damage due to their vehicles rolling away from being parked.

And, many of you around my age probably remember the whole "curb your wheels" training stuff, including in various areas, ads or DMV posters, of a few decades ago. So, vehicle roll-aways was deemed to be a problem by someone. And now we have a solution? ;)
 

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“My 2010 Outback was the lever design, and it required yanking the handle all the way up to be useful on hills.”

My Pontiac G6 had that issue. Five minutes at a mechanic to adjust it solved that issue
2010 outback had an electronic parking brake.

My 2010 legacy has an electronic parking brake, and has never needed adjusting so there is that, as well.
 

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“My 2010 Outback was the lever design, and it required yanking the handle all the way up to be useful on hills.”

My Pontiac G6 had that issue. Five minutes at a mechanic to adjust it solved that issue
Who wants to spend that much time adjusting their parking brake? Or more pertinent: how many people out there will notice it’s not adjusted properly and have the adjustment done?
 

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that’s what’s funny about ours. Sometimes it automatically engages, other times it doesn’t. Either way it is physically easier to do with the switch.
I've noticed that mine will randomly disengage when shifting out of Park. There doesn't seem to be any logic to when it does or doesn't.:unsure:
 

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“My 2010 Outback was the lever design, and it required yanking the handle all the way up to be useful on hills.”

My Pontiac G6 had that issue. Five minutes at a mechanic to adjust it solved that issue
Yes, temporarily, until the pads wore more. All of my mechanical cable driven emergency brakes worked just like that. Either keep adjusting, or keep stepping/pulling the lever more as the brakes wore.
 

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I've noticed that mine will randomly disengage when shifting out of Park. There doesn't seem to be any logic to when it does or doesn't.:unsure:
When shifting out of park or when you press the gas after shifting out of park? The latter is normal.
 

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“My 2010 Outback was the lever design, and it required yanking the handle all the way up to be useful on hills.”

My Pontiac G6 had that issue. Five minutes at a mechanic to adjust it solved that issue
My 1977 Celica and Corona both had manual shift and center lever for the parking brake. There was a "window" in the boot over the lever pivot. Just push the boot down to expose the knurled thumb screw. Turn it clockwise to take the slack out of the cable. No need for a mechanic. No need to get out of the driver's seat.
 
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