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I've had my Ascent Limited for just over 20 months at just under 18500mi and low and behold.... Got rear ended today with my two mini schnauzer in the back after picking them up from the groomer 馃ズ.
I took meticulous care of my car and I'm so hurt now. Looking for advice if anyone can help.
Called police, called insurance co but had to leave message since no one answered. Called Subaru to make sure report on file, transported to ER due to neck pain, and already requested appointment for Monday at only Subaru dealership in my city to start looking to repair.
You girl driving and her mom showed up. The police took report and info exchange form completed. Just making sure I covered my bases. Thanks for any advice.
5573


5574
 

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Sorry to hear about your troubles. Hope your neck is feeling better. Since you were rear ended, I assume you were not at fault and the other person鈥檚 insurance is paying for damages. Aside from the obvious, there insurance should include a comparable rent car and payment to you for the diminished value of your car.
 

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It's always a bummer when something like this happens. What's most important is that "you" (and your furry friends) are ok and the Ascent did its job protecting you.

From the photos, it doesn't look like you got whacked to major hard and it was straight on, so the repairs "should" be pretty straight forward. The person hitting from behind is generally and almost always held accountable, so their insurance ultimately should cover the full cost.
 

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Sorry to hear about your troubles. Hope your neck is feeling better. Since you were rear ended, I assume you were not at fault and the other person鈥檚 insurance is paying for damages. Aside from the obvious, there insurance should include a comparable rent car and payment to you for the diminished value of your car.
Yeah, she was a (just turned) 16 y.o. I could see her coming down the hill and the expression on her face once she looked up from her lap (probably texting while driving) and realizing that she would not be able to break in time to avoid collision. I has even asked her to contact her mom because she was very nervous, understandably. I just want this all resolved fairly and efficiently. I'll miss my beautiful car though.... for a little while. I already setup an appt to take to my local Subaru dealership tomorrow for assessment of damages. Just playing the waiting game on my auto insurer to contact me since this happened on Saturday (yesterday).
 

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It's always a bummer when something like this happens. What's most important is that "you" (and your furry friends) are ok and the Ascent did its job protecting you.

From the photos, it doesn't look like you got whacked to major hard and it was straight on, so the repairs "should" be pretty straight forward. The person hitting from behind is generally and almost always held accountable, so their insurance ultimately should cover the full cost.
Right, I'm glad my boys were ok as well and my spouse was just around the corner to come down and pick them up to take back home while I waited for police and EMS to arrive. It was a hard hit and my car looks terrible. But, alas, I am looking forward to getting better from my neck and upper back, L shoulder, and L hip injuries.
 

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Yeah, she was a (just turned) 16 y.o. I could see her coming down the hill and the expression on her face once she looked up from her lap (probably texting while driving) and realizing that she would not be able to break in time to avoid collision.
I really wish irresponsible idiots could learn their lessons by not involving innocent bystanders. It amazes me how much I see this behavior.
Sorry to hear about your accident and I hope you and your car recover quickly and fully.
 

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Firstly, I hope you and your dogs are ok. Be sure to follow up with your doctor, sometimes subtle injuries received from a car accident take a few days to manifest themselves. This happened to me once.

You did the right thing by calling the police. The insurance companies usually always want a formal police accident report.

It looks like a minimal impact that should not have affected the unibody, but be sure to insist that it's very carefully checked by a top-rated body shop and by a Subaru dealership. You need to establish all of the damage up-front. Any damage discovered later will be very hard to get covered by the insurance company. Be sure to talk to the body shop's manager directly and not via the insurance company. You should bring the car to several body shops of your own choosing for quotes and not use the one preferred by the insurance company. Compare the damage report from each shop to ensure they concur.

It appears that you need a new rear liftgate and perhaps a new bumper. This should restore your Ascent to its previous condition, but unfortunately, Carfax will now show that it's been in a significant accident that may adversely affect its resale value. You can try to complain about that to the insurance company, but it's unlikely that they will reimburse you for any future losses.

Be certain that the body shop uses only Subaru sourced replacement parts and uses absolutely no body-putty which can crack and degrade over the life of the car. The rear liftgate and bumper components should be completely replaced and not merely repaired. It's imperative that you select only a top-rated body shop to ensure that the job is done right and not just to save the insurance company money.

Check the repair very carefully and be certain that the new paint matches the existing paint. Once you approve the repair, that's usually the end of the insurance company's and body shop's involvement, so be 100% certain before you accept the car back. Involve an expert if you feel you cannot fully assess the repair yourself, even if you have to pay someone to help you. Your Subaru dealer may be able to help with this.

Other than the Carfax issue, which there's nothing much you can do about, your Ascent should be able to be properly restored to its former condition, but you will need to be actively involved in the process to ensure the best results. Never leave it all up to the insurance company.
 

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It sounds like you are new to managing accidents. My first piece of advice involves the insurance company of the at fault party. They are not your friend. Never answer their questions over the phone. When they contact you, simply state you are happy to answer some questions if they mail them to you in writing (email is fine). At that point you need to be VERY careful on how you phrase your responses when writing back. You are not even required to answer them. You have zero contractual relationship with that company. Their sole job is to minimize the cash outflow for their firm (while covering their contractual obligations to their client) and they will attempt to do that by trying to transfer some percentage of the responsibility for the accident to you. They will try and make you very comfortable in their interaction with you (getting your guard down) so you talk freely. You should not lie, but how you phrase your responses is critical. In contrast, you do have a contractual relationship with your own insurance company. Their responsibility is to you, their client per the insurance contract. They will work to make sure the funds are available for getting the vehicle repaired and will negotiate directly with the at fault party's insurance company. You should get a copy of the police report and any witness statements.

You are not required to have your vehicle repaired at the preferred auto body shop suggested by your or their insurance company. In most cases a new vehicle such as yours would be required to use all OEM parts. At some point in the vehicles life the insurance company will want to use equivalent parts instead. Resist this. Review your insurance contract to determine what they are legally required to do. In this case, it is the owner of the at fault vehicle that is required to make you whole (bring you back to the pre-accident condition). They will do that through in part from their contract with their insurance company. Going to the dealer for repair is fine (as long as they have a good repair facility). Their repair facility probably will use all OEM, but that does not mean that their insurance will want to pay for those higher priced parts. fight them tooth and nail if it comes to this.

Diminished value: Each state has its own diminished value law. Here is one website that I came across for Georgia. I know nothing about this website or firm other than the general information appears to be accurate. Note that going through your insurance company is not your only avenue for recovery. You can always sue the at fault party directly (you do not sue their insurance company). That usually brings their insurance company to the table in a more serious stance. When necessary, I have done this and been very successful.

medical: I hope that you have medical coverage in your auto insurance policy. It is typically called Med-pay. you can tap into that fund for now if you have any out of pocket medical expenses. Med pay is very inexpensive and my recommendation is to have this coverage as high as possible. You should most definitely go to your doctor for a check up (and chiropractor who has some experience with auto accidents). Often medical problems arise later after an accident from which you first experience little to no pain. Do NOT close out your medical part of the claim until sufficient time has passed to be certain your medical issues are fully resolved. Do not tell their insurance company of any preconditions. Talk to your attorney prior to revealing any of this. Their insurance company will use this to reduce their financial obligation to cover any medical expenses from injury. they will try and bring in all types of extraneous conditions to suggest that they contributed to your post accident condition.

Rental: Keep an eye on the rental term. You should be able to get an equivalent vehicle for the length of time that is required to repair the vehicle. Sometimes a shop will take their time and the insurance company will stop rental coverage. If this occurs, you will need to get involved. Read and be familiar with your policy details on rental coverage (not just the happy overview description).

Dogs: have the dogs checked out medically if you think there is a chance of some unseen injury. Insurance will cover them as well, but you may have some challenges if they were not properly secured in the vehicle with a harness. Legitimate arguments would be made that you bare some of the responsibility for any injuries to them.

get well soon to occupants and vehicle.
 

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@packout and @pro10is have provided excellent guidance. One more bit of advice. Don't let the driver or her insurance company talk you into using your own collusion coverage and letting your insurance subrogate to the at-fault driver's insurance. This can leave you holding the bag for your own deductible. This has to be 100 % on the at-fault driver.

Got luck and feel better.
 

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The deductible will be collected by your own insurance company particularly since in this case there would be no fault from the OP driver. When you file your claim, request in writing for your insurer to include the deducatble as part of the subrogation. I would not worry about the deductible for the above reason as well as it is easily collected even after the fact through the driver or their insurance company separately. It all comes under the principle of making you whole. It is far easier and quicker to go through your own insurance company which is why you pay them.

I also hope the OP notices the item I posted on diminished value in terms of how this is calculated. You want to truly get the diminished loss value properly calculated and paid for. The at fault insurance company will no doubt attempt at minimizing this value. The article I posted goes a bit into this.

On a separate note, anyone who has ever been hit from behind would recognize by now the value of maintaining space even when stopped but particularly when moving to the vehicle in front of you. It becomes much more of a complex at fault calculation when the distance is smaller than it should be. When stopped you should always be able to see the bottom of the tires of the vehicle in front of you. This by the way is good practice in case of emergencies (even a bit of a larger distance). It provides an out for your vehicle in case you need to get out of line quickly (riots, attacks, fires etc.).
 

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@packout and @pro10is have provided excellent guidance. One more bit of advice. Don't let the driver or her insurance company talk you into using your own collusion coverage and letting your insurance subrogate to the at-fault driver's insurance. This can leave you holding the bag for your own deductible. This has to be 100 % on the at-fault driver.

Got luck and feel better.
This is likely state specific as all insurance is, but here in PA, the deductible is refunded by "your" insurance company once the claim is fully settled through subrogation. I know this for a fact because I've experienced it twice with two different insurance companies that I've had coverage with.
 

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On a separate note, anyone who has ever been hit from behind would recognize by now the value of maintaining space even when stopped but particularly when moving to the vehicle in front of you. It becomes much more of a complex at fault calculation when the distance is smaller than it should be. When stopped you should always be able to see the bottom of the tires of the vehicle in front of you. This by the way is good practice in case of emergencies (even a bit of a larger distance). It provides an out for your vehicle in case you need to get out of line quickly (riots, attacks, fires etc.).
True. Years ago I was rear ended stopped behind a school bus at a red light. I was in a vw bug and hit by by a much bigger car. Even with my foot fully on the brake, I was slid under the rear of the bus. No damage to the front of my car but the windshield was inches from the bus's bumper. If I was stopped any closer to the bus before getting hit the outcome would have been severe.

Ironically, I had a trailer hitch on the VW which had rails running to the engine/transmission bullhead. The hitch took almost all the impact and the only damage to the back of my car was a bent bumper and a crease in the engine hood. The car that hit me looked like it ran into a lamp post. Wish I had pictures.
 

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They will try and make you very comfortable in their interaction with you (getting your guard down) so you talk freely. You should not lie, but how you phrase your responses is critical.
Good advice here!
I was in an accident a few years ago and the other party鈥檚 insurance called me multiple times. They were very polite but asked a lot of detailed questions that if I hadn鈥檛 been careful in answering would鈥檝e led to assigning even a small amount of fault to me. This would have saved that insurance company thousands.
If you do answer any questions don鈥檛 make guesses. Don鈥檛 admit to anything that鈥檚 not 100% by the book. If unsure how to answer tell them to contact your insurance co.
Finally, my answer was always the same and the questions stop immediately: 鈥渞efer to the dashcam footage of the incident鈥. My cam shows both the interior and front view so it proves seatbelts were worn, driver attentive, lane position, etc 鈥 invaluable.
 

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Good advice here!
I was in an accident a few years ago and the other party鈥檚 insurance called me multiple times. They were very polite but asked a lot of detailed questions that if I hadn鈥檛 been careful in answering would鈥檝e led to assigning even a small amount of fault to me. This would have saved that insurance company thousands.
If you do answer any questions don鈥檛 make guesses. Don鈥檛 admit to anything that鈥檚 not 100% by the book. If unsure how to answer tell them to contact your insurance co.
Finally, my answer was always the same and the questions stop immediately: 鈥渞efer to the dashcam footage of the incident鈥. My cam shows both the interior and front view so it proves seatbelts were worn, driver attentive, lane position, etc 鈥 invaluable.
I now always use both a front and rear dashcam. Cheap insurance.

When I was much younger, well before dashcams were even conceived, I was involved in two accidents which were not my fault. In the first, the other driver lied outright about what he did to cause the accident and blamed it all on me. I had to go to small claims court to get that resolved. Good thing I had a witness.

In the second case, a much more serious accident involving the other driver getting injured and property damage to a homeowner, the police blamed me for the accident even though I clearly was not at fault. When I protested, the chief of police pulled me into his office and violently threatened me because "I called his officer a liar". I was only 18 at the time but I stood my ground. I had to hire a lawyer to prove in court that there was no way I could have caused the accident. Years later, I discovered that the investigating officer and the driver of the other car, both in their 20's, were close friends and I had been framed for the accident.

If I had a dashcam at the time, it would have been simple to prove innocence in both cases. Everyone should have a dashcam, don't wait until it's too late.
 
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