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2020 Ascent Limited
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had Adaptive Cruise Control since my 2017 Forester XT and really do like the feature. I traded the Forester in for a 2020 Ascent this May because we needed a bigger car and the offers available made the transition pretty enticing.

I normally use Adaptive Cruise Control on the Interstate and keep my "set distance" from the car in front either "closest" or "medium". But, I don't like when the system detects major slowing or a traffic jam so I disengage the cruise control with a tap of the brake, or the steering wheel button. No biggie.

Tonight, I was driving on a main city road with the cruise control set at 50 (45mph Speed Limit) because the lights are normally "timed" very well for easy driving at that hour. While I know the Adaptive Cruise Control doesn't register traffic lights, I had a thought to see how the system would handle completely slowing traffic in front. (This has been a thought for over three years)

I was traveling behind another vehicle and the cruise control (CC) was working according to its design. The traffic light ahead turned to yellow, the car in front slowed, and we slowed ... and then the light changed to red and we came to a full stop behind the car in front of me. Surprisingly, it was VERY subtle and comfortable. I had never done this before.

When the light changed to green, the car in front proceeded but we didn't move initially so I thought the CC was disabled when I came to a stop and I accelerated just a touch. NOPE, the CC was working fine and picked up right where it left off after we were rolling. Would it have accelerated on its own from a dead stop if I had let the distance increase between me and the car in front of me?

I was super surprised it could be used this way. Maybe it shouldn't be, but I have always disengaged CC when approaching a light with slowing cars. Yes, coming up on a completely stopped car is a COMPLETELY different story as that engages the crash avoidance systems, and I know this isn't "auto-pilot", but does anyone else use Adaptive Cruise Control in "city" traffic this way?
 

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Hi, no. It would notify you that the car moved and sit there. Eventually, it would enable the parking brake.

To resume, tap the resume lever on the steering wheel or tap the gas.
 

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2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
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If ACC brings you to a full stop, the vehicle goes into "Hold" mode...it's even displayed on the center stack. It's not going to move without you telling it after traffic resumes for safety reasons. As Robert indicated, a tap on the gas or the "resume" button gets it going again. This feature is a "fatigue" saver when in heavy stop and go, especially on the Interstate. I really have appreciated it many times!
 

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I use the ACC for stop and go traffic all the time. Other things to note when using in this mode.

1. You and set the acceleration speed from economy to faster. I use economy.
2. If a car turns in front of you, the ACC will wait until the car has completed the turn and then start thinking about going. I usually accelerate around and then the ACC kicks back in.
3. If a car darts in front of you too quick or comes from an unusual angle then the ACC may not react in time and you will have to hit the brake.
4. Heavy rain but Eye Site stays on some vehicles get "washed out" and the Eye Site does not see them. You are best to turn off the ACC until the rain lets up in these conditions. Usually Eye Site turns it self off in heavy rain but not always. I am sure it has some predetermined set of conditions to turn off but as always be careful in the gray areas.
5. I set the following distance to the max in traffic and the ACC does a better job of smoothing out the speed changes.

Any more experiences from others?
 

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It's an awesome feature if you drive mountain canyons frequently. It will throttle down the vehicle before applying brakes as you descend mountain roads. I drive the Big Thompson Canyon a lot in Colorado. Leaving Estes Park, I will set it at 40 and it does a great job of keeping the vehicle under control without riding the brakes...like most of the flatlanders do as they creep around the corners. I will never own a car without this feature again.
 

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It's an awesome feature if you drive mountain canyons frequently. It will throttle down the vehicle before applying brakes as you descend mountain roads. I drive the Big Thompson Canyon a lot in Colorado. Leaving Estes Park, I will set it at 40 and it does a great job of keeping the vehicle under control without riding the brakes...like most of the flatlanders do as they creep around the corners. I will never own a car without this feature again.
And it slows down on sharp turns, and refuses to accelerate into them as well. Human braking may still be required in some instances to slow it down quicker, but, at least it won't go zooming out of a turn it took too fast (unless of course someone hits a 25mph turn with the car at 90 and ACC set to 90 - won't slow down quick enough for that).
 

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And it slows down on sharp turns, and refuses to accelerate into them as well. Human braking may still be required in some instances to slow it down quicker, but, at least it won't go zooming out of a turn it took too fast (unless of course someone hits a 25mph turn with the car at 90 and ACC set to 90 - won't slow down quick enough for that).
Good point. It can also loose sight of a car you might be following into a curve. My experience is that it has looses sight of the lead car and starts accelerating.
 

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Good point. It can also loose sight of a car you might be following into a curve. My experience is that it has looses sight of the lead car and starts accelerating.
Excellent point. If the turn radius isn't really sharp, it'll do that, which isn't good.

I'm finding I am a big fan of that little green dot. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks everyone for the responses. I really never thought about using it in stop-and-go traffic, but I will now. I also messed around with the ACC acceleration settings, but don't recall what I set them to. (Knowing me, it's probably on Dynamic :rolleyes:) I really do love the feature, but wished I had known about using it in stop and go situations in 2017!

I am still under the impression this stop-and-go operation only really works in decent traffic at moderate speeds. The idea of having this set at 50 and a car is stopped at a light a few hundred yards from you is going to require driver interaction as EyeSight won't pick up the car in front until it's too late for a graceful deceleration.
 

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The idea of having this set at 50 and a car is stopped at a light a few hundred yards from you is going to require driver interaction as EyeSight won't pick up the car in front until it's too late for a graceful deceleration.
This! ⬆ ⬆ ⬆ ⬆ ⬆
 

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When I was towing my pop up camper back from a holiday weekend last year it was GREAT to set the ACC and just let my car creep after the others.

I was always double checking, but for 1 hr in very slow traffic I only had to hit the "resume" button a few times and other than that hardly interacted with the vehicle. It was a lot less stressful than doing it manually.
 

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I typically don't use it around town all that much. I have our acceleration rate set on the slowest available (whatever it's called) to smooth its operation at road speed, which means acceleration from a stop isn't as brisk as most other drivers would expect. If I am using it around town, I usually supplement acceleration with the gas pedal. I do appreciate the increased smoothness of the CVT when using ACC, but do note that engine speeds are almost universally higher with it (increasing noise), so I often revert to just driving it manually.
 

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As other car manufacturers are trying to catch up to Subaru, I wonder if their ACC is as good. I am rather impressed with Subaru's ACC.
As good as eyesight is, it pales in comparison to Tesla! Don’t get me wrong I love ACC and use it as much as possible. I did get to drive a model 3 recently and it is fully aware of vehicles all around the car, lane markings, signs, signals, etc. They’re the gold standard everyone else needs to catch up to.

Any more experiences from others?
I was going to mention this until I read your post! I like to keep the following distance at a minimum while driving but as I see a stop ahead I’ll increase the distance using the buttons on the steering wheel. This keeps gaps in traffic to a minimum while smoothing out deceleration.
I’ve found that other drivers kinda suck so when you’re following someone who brakes at the last second, the Ascent on ACC will brake even harder. Easy fix is increasing following distance. Also, if the gap is too big, undoubtedly someone will change lanes to fill the gap. Then the Ascent slows down to maintain the gap, and repeat. That’s why I keep the following distance at a minimum for driving and maximum for stopping.
 

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Tesla was designed from the bottom up with the smarts to be able to handle stuff up to "self driving", so yea, it's a lot more sophisticated than even the latest version of Eyesight as well as most ACC implementations on other nameplates and models. But Eyesight is pretty darn nice within its capabilities for sure!
 

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Tesla was designed from the bottom up with the smarts to be able to handle stuff up to "self driving", so yea, it's a lot more sophisticated than even the latest version of Eyesight as well as most ACC implementations on other nameplates and models. But Eyesight is pretty darn nice within its capabilities for sure!
I have a feeling that Subaru's solution is going to coincide with their electric cars. On that note, Toyota just announced an EV breakthrough that coincides with Subaru's EV timeline. And, Toyota used a minimally modified rendering of Subaru's EV concept as one of their concepts.
4719

I very quickly threw together the "side" by "side" of one of Toyota's concept renderings, and the Subaru Evoltis concept.
4718
 

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Love adaptive cruise control in rush hour stop and go traffic, huge stress reliever. The system in my Lincoln is older and won't bring you to a complete stop, my Jag will stop and re-accelerate if you want it to. I don't have a preference between the Subaru or the JAG system, but the Jag can catch you off guard if you're not looking for a moment (of course, you should always be looking), and the car in front of you moves, especially if you have it on an aggressive accelerate mode.

I also use adaptive cruise control on back roads, 35 to 55mph, and always on the highway. Not only is it a stress relief, it's also an important safety feature, I feel. Kind of pointless to use in around town driving, at least where I live.
 

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As good as eyesight is, it pales in comparison to Tesla! Don’t get me wrong I love ACC and use it as much as possible. I did get to drive a model 3 recently and it is fully aware of vehicles all around the car, lane markings, signs, signals, etc. They’re the gold standard everyone else needs to catch up to.
Having used both, they're actually quite comparable for ACC. The Telsa's display is fancier and the autopilot (which I don't have) will detect and avoid cars in other lanes, but for the adaptive cruise control the experience is almost identical.

I did see somewhere the tech view behind both cars (what the computer sees) and the output is very very similar.

Also, it's nice that both manufacturers worry about safety so have very high crash test ratings.

I think the only thing that will get my out of my Ascent will be a CyberTruk!
500 mile range
14" ground clearance (adjustable)
sports car acceleration
14.5k lbs towing!
 
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