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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've driven ~43500 miles in my Ascent over the last 3+ years and haven't had many quirks with EyeSight. However, over this past weekend the same new behavior happened to me twice.

The first instance was Saturday while driving about 40mph down a road which I travel often, single lane in each direction, no oncoming traffic, I received the red flashing LED Pre-Collision warning on the HUD as I approached a curve to the left. The only obstacle in view was a yellow left arrow sign and a mailbox. The only factors I can assume contributed to the warning were the road being slightly wet from a light rain and few markings on the road in that location. The emergency braking did not activate.

The second instance was an offramp from the interstate that splits into 2 lanes then curves to the right. I was in the left lane and there was a guardrail in front of me with those same yellow turn signs. Again it had recently rained, traveling about 40mph, and I received the warning but no emergency braking.

Here’s a link to the videos from my dashcam
 

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That's interesting. I think I remember only one or two false positives in ours. Both times, I did not get the emergency braking, but did get the flashing red LEDs. As I recall, those were also on roads with sharp curves and that behavior hasn't recurred. It must think it sees something in these types of scenarios, but I haven't been able to figure out what it is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
For what its worth, my eyesight powered cruise control nearly accelerated into the vehicle in front of me yesterday. So we've got that going on, which is nice.
did it not see the vehicle in front of you such as differential speed too high or a sudden lane change?
 

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did it not see the vehicle in front of you such as differential speed too high or a sudden lane change?
Vehicle in front of me switched lanes to pass the vehicle in front of it.

My vehicle did not see the new vehicle (target lock not acquired) and began accelerating up to the designated cruise speed, which was slower than what this vehicle was travelling at by 7-10MPH (we were doing 50MPH in a 60MPH when this occurred).

This is precisely why, despite automation, one needs to pay attention to the road with these systems engaged.
 

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^ I've experienced both what @xydadx3 / @hokiefyd and @justmatt reported.

I believe that the latter is what is mentioned in pages 47-49 of the MY21 EyeSight Owner's Manual - https://cdn.subarunet.com/stis/doc/ownerManual/MSA5M2126A_STIS.pdf , where EyeSight doesn't "see" that second vehicle (either the one that's cut-in/out or the one that remains).

With the former, I think it has to do with how fast the vehicle thinks you're coming to/towards that seeming obstruction: that it's a perceived-stoppage vs. rate-of-change kind of deal.

There's definitely some interesting ghosts in the machine. My daughter and I have gotten to the point that we can almost always predict what the system will do, based on my driving inputs.

And it's that last that's why the cautionary statement @justmatt ended with in his last post above is so important.

No doubt about it, there's definitely times in my 3 years with the Ascent that EyeSight as well as the other safety systems have saved me from "pucker moments," but there's definitely also been more than a few times where the same systems have made some rather questionable calls that, had it not been for having RTMFM, there might have been some interesting outcomes, too (i.e. the vehicle following mine rear-ending me).
 

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First, I'd try cleaning the inside of your windshield. It sometimes does things like that when signs or lights reflect back and create glare spots on the windshield.

Failing that, on turns, if one waits a little bit to initiate the turn, Eyesight tends to think you're going to drive into something. Could it have been that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
First, I'd try cleaning the inside of your windshield. It sometimes does things like that when signs or lights reflect back and create glare spots on the windshield.

Failing that, on turns, if one waits a little bit to initiate the turn, Eyesight tends to think you're going to drive into something. Could it have been that?
Judging by the replay it looks like I hadn’t yet gotten to the point in the road where I would’ve started turning. Maybe that contributed if it hadn’t locked onto the lane markings to see the road curving?
I do need to clean my windshield inside and out. While doing so I’m curious how the eyesight cameras are holding up or if they’re getting dirty. Since the manual tells us not to clean the lens covers and to cover them when cleaning, is there a way for them to be properly cleaned at some point?
 

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Since the manual tells us not to clean the lens covers and to cover them when cleaning, is there a way for them to be properly cleaned at some point?
Sadly, no, not even by the dealerships. Even they are instructed to replace the assemblies if they're so dirty it's affecting operation. 😞

I am also guessing that even if someone did clean them would require resetting all of the learning info as well (something that needs to be done if they're replaced).

From the Service Manual...

Font Slope Parallel Triangle Document
 

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Sadly, no, not even by the dealerships. Even they are instructed to replace the assemblies if they're so dirty it's affecting operation. 😞
Have you heard of many cases of this? As of now my only ES car is a CPO, so I have no way of knowing what was done before my ownership (i.e. proper safeguards when cleaning the window). I don't have a reason to doubt how it's functioning, but I'll be curious to see if I can spot a difference once I get a few months under my belt in my Ascent.
 

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Have you heard of many cases of this? As of now my only ES car is a CPO, so I have no way of knowing what was done before my ownership (i.e. proper safeguards when cleaning the window). I don't have a reason to doubt how it's functioning, but I'll be curious to see if I can spot a difference once I get a few months under my belt in my Ascent.
To date, it's been very rare that I've seen the units needing to be replaced - and not in an Ascent, but in a much older Subie with a LOT of miles.
 

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^ I'm tempted to say (empirically, as I have no objective data to speak of) that EyeSight is more robust than we give it credit for.

I honestly can't imagine every EyeSight-equipped Subaru owner out there being nearly as fastidious as many of us who are on the Forums or in FB Groups are - we are by-definition a self-selecting dataset of, well, at least hobbyists, if not outright enthusiasts.

I mean, for all the folks who never take the time to RTMFM, we've also gotta take into account the entry-level-job interior cleaners at the typical wash-and-go..... 😅
 

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Vehicle in front of me switched lanes to pass the vehicle in front of it.

My vehicle did not see the new vehicle (target lock not acquired) and began accelerating up to the designated cruise speed, which was slower than what this vehicle was travelling at by 7-10MPH (we were doing 50MPH in a 60MPH when this occurred).

This is precisely why, despite automation, one needs to pay attention to the road with these systems engaged.
This has happened to me several times. I enjoy driving so I pay close attention..but I will admit that this was moderately terrifying the first time it happened.
 

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Yep. I've gotten the warning on a number of roads with sharp bends that have large arrow signs at the bend. To Eyesight, it looks like I'm heading straight for an obstacle, until I start to turn. Another case is where I'm following a car and it slows and turns off the road. I know it'll be clear by time I get there but Eyesight doesn't register that it's leaving the path in front of me. Yet another is when I'm stopped at a 4 way stop, a vehicle is crossing in front of me, and I start to accelerate before it's totally past. And there's pulling too quickly into a parking spot or garage with a barrier, bush or wall at the end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I’ve had your second example happen more times than I can count. I’m always hoping I don’t cut it close enough for the brakes to actuate 😂
 

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Yep. I've gotten the warning on a number of roads with sharp bends that have large arrow signs at the bend. To Eyesight, it looks like I'm heading straight for an obstacle, until I start to turn. Another case is where I'm following a car and it slows and turns off the road. I know it'll be clear by time I get there but Eyesight doesn't register that it's leaving the path in front of me. Yet another is when I'm stopped at a 4 way stop, a vehicle is crossing in front of me, and I start to accelerate before it's totally past. And there's pulling too quickly into a parking spot or garage with a barrier, bush or wall at the end.
This is the part that gets me - the steering wheel is connected to the headlights, and the headlights will "bend" to illuminate the direction of travel. Why didn't this user story make it over to the Eyesight engineers, meaning, when the car is travelling around a moderate bend, "look" in the direction of travel, i.e. if the front wheels are pointed 5 degrees left, look 5 degrees left for obstacles.
 

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The car is travelling around a moderate bend, "look" in the direction of travel, i.e. if the front wheels are pointed 5 degrees left, look 5 degrees left for obstacles.
In the instances I experienced, it was before I started to turn. The bend was coming up and the signs were straight ahead. Those were sharp bends on mountain roads and I was going at a fairly good clip. IMO, the warnings were legit. Perhaps a more advanced system might recognize an upcoming bend and not throw a warning.
 

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This is the part that gets me - the steering wheel is connected to the headlights, and the headlights will "bend" to illuminate the direction of travel. Why didn't this user story make it over to the Eyesight engineers, meaning, when the car is travelling around a moderate bend, "look" in the direction of travel, i.e. if the front wheels are pointed 5 degrees left, look 5 degrees left for obstacles.
Actually the steering angle is more deeply embedded than tracking just the headlights. The steering angle is a critical input for the stability control systems and it's constantly compared to the yaw rate of the body. If the eyesight engineers were interested in alleviating the above situation there's plenty of data available through the vehicle dynamics sensors.

Bringing eyesight the smarts to reduce these false positives is probably not going to happen until the next level of autonomy. Ie: needs to read and recognize highway markers, fences, buildings etc. Currently it's just interested in vehicles and pedestrians.
 

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This is the part that gets me - the steering wheel is connected to the headlights, and the headlights will "bend" to illuminate the direction of travel. Why didn't this user story make it over to the Eyesight engineers, meaning, when the car is travelling around a moderate bend, "look" in the direction of travel, i.e. if the front wheels are pointed 5 degrees left, look 5 degrees left for obstacles.
We don't know that EyeSight does not have the ability to bias its object detecting to one side or the other if there's a steering input. Unless we know for sure exactly what EyeSight is seeing and why it's alerting the driver, it may be premature for us to assume or state that it doesn't.

Having said that, if it doesn't currently do that, I imagine there are good engineering reasons. It does seem like there are certain zones programmed into the image that are used for different purposes. For lane tracking, it's down near the fenders. For lead vehicle acquisition, it's higher up. Making these zones dynamic vs. static is likely a very sticky proposition. Steering input doesn't necessary equate to road direction ahead. Speed and lateral traction can all influence the "slip angle", or direction of travel relative to steering angle. Additionally, depending on the particular situation, EyeSight may be seeing road signs ahead before the driver has begun to turn the wheel. I'd also guess there are camera hardware limitations: its best field of vision is centered "straight ahead" and moving the detection zones to the right or left, using cameras with stationary lenses, may be problematic. There may also be computer hardware or software limitations: I imagine the processing power for making those detection zones dynamic would really increase the required workload on the computer hardware and software...it'd be an additional layer of complexity on top of what is already a pretty impressive suite of visual detection skills.

I think it's also worth noting that all of this comes on $20k Imprezas and Crosstreks. These aren't $80k Teslas...this is technology leveraged in very basic economy cars as well as large SUVs. I'm continually impressed with the flexibility and scalability of this EyeSight system Subaru have implemented.
 
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