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Parts are becoming available. Several of us have had the recall performed. See below:

 
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Yes-all 3 recalls 12/26-all good-odd feels like i can coast for miles once i hit 30 MPH. Strange!
Mine seems to coast better now too after getting the TCM and ECU recalls done. I wonder if there is a real change? I've been off work for two weeks and hadn't really gotten the Ascent out on the highway much. Staying in the 'burbs was getting me 15mpg, but I got that up to 20.7 yesterday after driving it farther. That's when I noticed that I was reaching 80+ mph fairly easily and the car wanted to coast forever. I have yet to get my PCV done as the parts weren't in stock as of Dec. 18th. I would like to get this done asap though to avoid something catastrophic happening.
 

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Just as an aside, when the PCV valve is replaced it requires removal of the intercooler, which when reinstalled requires the replacement of a couple of rubber seals. My dealer got the PCV valve in, but had run out of the seals for the intercooler, so had to wait for those. Suggest you ask your dealer if they have the seals in stock before you take it in for the valve replacement, otherwise you might have to reschedule as I did. Of course the technician might reuse the old ones, but they aren't suppose to.
 

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Just as an aside, when the PCV valve is replaced it requires removal of the intercooler, which when reinstalled requires the replacement of a couple of rubber seals. My dealer got the PCV valve in, but had run out of the seals for the intercooler, so had to wait for those. Suggest you ask your dealer if they have the seals in stock before you take it in for the valve replacement, otherwise you might have to reschedule as I did. Of course the technician might reuse the old ones, but they aren't suppose to.
Ask the dealer to inform you if they have all the required parts when you make the appointment, that's what I did. I think that may have had the effect for them to look up and preorder all the parts before I showed up. I just had my Ascent done this week, they had all the necessary parts on hand when I arrived.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I鈥檓 all finished with the recalls. The dealer was able to do the PCV recall a few days ago. I hope they didnt just reuse the intercooler seals. My Ascent feels like a different vehicle after doing all the recalls. I think its better. It feels more direct, more powerful, and it appears that I may be even getting better gas mileage. I don鈥檛 mind these recalls and updates as long as they make car better. Even our phones get updated.


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Mine seems to coast better now too after getting the TCM and ECU recalls done. I wonder if there is a real change? I've been off work for two weeks and hadn't really gotten the Ascent out on the highway much. Staying in the 'burbs was getting me 15mpg, but I got that up to 20.7 yesterday after driving it farther. That's when I noticed that I was reaching 80+ mph fairly easily and the car wanted to coast forever. I have yet to get my PCV done as the parts weren't in stock as of Dec. 18th. I would like to get this done asap though to avoid something catastrophic happening.
Yes-all 3 recalls 12/26-all good-odd feels like i can coast for miles once i hit 30 MPH. Strange!
Just as an aside, when the PCV valve is replaced it requires removal of the intercooler, which when reinstalled requires the replacement of a couple of rubber seals. My dealer got the PCV valve in, but had run out of the seals for the intercooler, so had to wait for those. Suggest you ask your dealer if they have the seals in stock before you take it in for the valve replacement, otherwise you might have to reschedule as I did. Of course the technician might reuse the old ones, but they aren't suppose to.
Has everyone had their pcv valve replaced yet?
 

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I really wish they would allow ECUs and TCMs and such to be upgraded over the air. They will in the future. They do now with other brands. This would curtail a LOT of dealer visits, which would keep more money in Subaru鈥檚 pockets. Less shop time they have to reimburse dealers. They鈥檙e all about nickel and diming profitability, they should make this change. User acceptance required, of course.

WU006 was purely an easy ECU flash, this would鈥檝e been great to do over the air. Had quite a few pure reflashes on my old Forester too.
 

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I really wish they would allow ECUs and TCMs and such to be upgraded over the air. They will in the future. They do now with other brands. This would curtail a LOT of dealer visits, which would keep more money in Subaru鈥檚 pockets. Less shop time they have to reimburse dealers. They鈥檙e all about nickel and diming profitability, they should make this change. User acceptance required, of course.

WU006 was purely an easy ECU flash, this would鈥檝e been great to do over the air. Had quite a few pure reflashes on my old Forester too.
It's a bit tricky having a major ECM or TCM update done over the air. On many such systems, if something went wrong in the middle of an update such as a power loss, the computer could be bricked and become completely dysfunctional or worse, unpredictable.

Subaru service technicians have to be trained to perform updates and the update instructions usually always warn to be very careful during updates and to check the ECM/TCM status afterward. This is far safer than over the air updates where there is no one to observe and verify. These are critical operational and safety systems that are software dependent. Updates need to be carefully performed.

This is why Subaru and many other manufacturers limit over the air or customer-initiated updates to non-critical systems such as the infotainment and Nav systems.
 

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Yet, there鈥檚 Tesla that does all sorts of over the air updates to their safety systems, self driving stuff.
Your response is what I expected, and is old 2000-era thinking.
It works because they鈥檝e built in all of the pre and post checks. Not rocket science. Flashing firmware is actually an extremely basic thing these days. It used to give folks the willies, but it鈥檚 pretty trivial stuff now. All depends on who鈥檚 writing the firmware and who designed the systems and their robust resiliencies to accept frequent, successful firmware flashes. Battery-backed, pre-post checks yada yada.
Mark my words - this will become far more common. As will real-time telematics, diagnostics and analytics across entire fleets of vehicles. This is already commonplace in Enterprise data centers and will eventually mainstream into many other areas. Especially with 5G.
 

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Yet, there鈥檚 Tesla that does all sorts of over the air updates to their safety systems, self driving stuff.
Your response is what I expected, and is old 2000-era thinking.
It works because they鈥檝e built in all of the pre and post checks. Not rocket science. Flashing firmware is actually an extremely basic thing these days. It used to give folks the willies, but it鈥檚 pretty trivial stuff now. All depends on who鈥檚 writing the firmware and who designed the systems and their robust resiliencies to accept frequent, successful firmware flashes. Battery-backed, pre-post checks yada yada.
Mark my words - this will become far more common. As will real-time telematics, diagnostics and analytics across entire fleets of vehicles. This is already commonplace in Enterprise data centers and will eventually mainstream into many other areas. Especially with 5G.
It may be old 2000-era (actually mid-2000 era) thinking, but unfortunately, for most car manufacturers it's still the reality. Tesla, a high-technology level auto manufacturer, is an obvious exception because they're hell-bent on redesigning everything from the ground up, which is great. They also have a poor dealer network which often necessitates some remote servicing.

In order to devise a fool-proof, reliable way to perform non-supervised updates, it's also necessary to: 1). Include a separate self-diagnostic system to ensure the update was successful, and 2). Include a fail-safe fall-back system to automatically restore the old software should something go wrong with the update.

This is indeed possible these days and many computer systems can now do this, including many smartphones, PCs, laptops, tablets, etc. Unfortunately, car manufacturers do not like to redesign their ECM/TCM systems often and stick with what they consider cheap, known, and reliable for as long as possible. We'll probably need to wait until the next generation of such systems comes to the lower and mid-level auto manufacturers, and then maybe we'll get non-supervised, over the air updates for critical automotive control modules.
 

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Yeah, it鈥檒l be a while, but it鈥檚 absolutely coming. Especially as the nanny/self driving stuff really starts to mainstream. Auto manus will have to have the quick ability to make global changes, and verify those changes were made successfully, real-time. I attend many tech conferences for my job and it鈥檚 insane where the focus is going as far as designing/deploying 鈥渆dge鈥 infrastructure and reducing latencies in order to support future IOT and Auto stuff at massive, connected scale.
 

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Yeah, it鈥檒l be a while, but it鈥檚 absolutely coming. Especially as the nanny/self driving stuff really starts to mainstream. Auto manus will have to have the quick ability to make global changes, and verify those changes were made successfully, real-time. I attend many tech conferences for my job and it鈥檚 insane where the focus is going as far as designing/deploying 鈥渆dge鈥 infrastructure and reducing latencies in order to support future IOT and Auto stuff at massive, connected scale.
I hear you and you're right. You would not believe what has to be done first to qualify such changes for mass production. I work for the world's 2nd largest semiconductor foundry that, among many other things, manufactures automotive electronics. It takes years to bring these things to production. Mid-level manufacturers like Subaru, Honda, Toyota, Ford, et al often let the high-level manufacturers like Mercedes, Audi, BMW, etc, blaze the way first and spend huge amounts of research and development money. We call it the "bleeding-edge" because it takes so much money to be the first to come out with high technology. Once the components required are designed and become less expensive, others hop on the bandwagon. I suppose this is necessary for them to produce less-expensive cars, but it's frustrating knowing that the technology exists and you can't get it sooner unless you spend big bucks on a luxury car.
 

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You'd figure Subaru would be quick in supplying dealers with the PCV valve since it can break off into the engine. I'm probably overly cautious but I've been holding back driving the Ascent until my dealer gets the part in stock.
 
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