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so, is it because the container for transmission fluid is the same as the engine oil container? For the guy to make a mistake?
Nope, totally different. I meant it (wasn't hyperbole), no oil lube tech or mechanic should ever make the mistake.
 

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Spec’s say -40C/F to 150C/302F. Probably good for transmission pan, if fixed to the outside(?).

Unfortunately, minimum order is 12.
 

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the warning sticker needs to be temperature and water resistant. I had this place make them.

High-Temperature Label Types

Label-aid offers custom high-temperature labels in several materials that are well suited for industrial and electronic applications:


  • Polyester - Polyester labels are the most common label material for high-temperature applications. This material can sustain temperatures up to 300° F.

  • Thermogard® – This high-temperature label is ideal for printed circuit boards (PCB), and is available as an acrylic or silicone adhesive with a paper or polyester liner. Thermogard® labels are halogen-free, are compliant with RoHS and other industry-wide specifications, and are manufactured in a multitude of colors. This material can sustain temperatures from 400° F up to 1,000° F.

  • Tribogard® – A high-temperature label option for PCB and electronic components. Tribogard® not only withstands high temperatures and harsh chemicals but is made with antistatic polyimides. Tribogard labels are designed to resist abrasion and to pass a number of industry standards, including MIL-STD-202G and Notice 12. These labels virtually eliminate the electrostatic charge generated when the label is removed from the liner that can discharge and destroy sensitive components during label application. Peel voltage is less than 100 volts. This material can sustain temperatures from 400° F up to 617° F.

  • Metalgard® -- Metalgard® labels are the best option for the aluminum and steel industries. Aggressive acrylic and silicone adhesives withstand up to 300° F, and labeling applications include the marking of coils, tubing, and machinery. Metalgard labels are halogen-free, created with environmentally safe materials, and meet all industry regulations and standards. Short term temperatures can sustain up to 1,100° F and an operating temperature of 750° F to 900° F.

  • Wiregard® -- Wiregard® high temp labels are created from a durable, flame retardant nylon cloth material, acrylic adhesive or polyimide materials. Made to label wire and cable materials, Wiregard labels are designed with ballpoint, dot-matrix or thermal printing in mind. They are REACH and RoHS compliant and meet industry flammability standards. Short term temperatures range from 256° F to 366° F.

  • Flamegard® -- Designed to meet UL94 standards, Flamegard® labels are receptive to ink, halogen-free, and flame retardant. Common applications for Flamegard labels include the marking of batteries, electronics components, and product identification. Temperatures can sustain up to 302° F for 100 hours, 500° F at 500 hours and 572° F for 90 seconds.
also:
The most notable difference is the adhesive used on the weatherproof thermal transfer and weatherproof direct thermal products. These materials have a hot-melt rubber adhesive that is engineered specifically for use at extreme freezing temperatures and on surfaces that may already be damp or wet with moisture.


The rest of the products on this list use an emulsion acrylic adhesive. Those adhesives have a much higher range of temperatures for more effective use with extreme heat applications. However, they're somewhat less effective (but still completely viable) at freezer temperatures.
 

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Nope, totally different. I meant it (wasn't hyperbole), no oil lube tech or mechanic should ever make the mistake.
Robert,

I know you noticed my label posting below so I wanted to follow up with you on a technical issue. What is the expected temperature of the transmission pan? They have labels that go up to 302F and then others in the temp range of 400 - 1000F. My second link suggests (I still have to contact the firm) that there is a label that will withstand high AND low temps which is what will be required.
 

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I've actually been trying to see if I could find any information on that, but I haven't yet. If I do, I will let everyone know. As you already mentioned, the problem isn't limited to the high range. I live in Metro NYC area, but still, even my travels (admittedly, I travel a LOT, but still)... even my travels frequently put me at below zero Fahrenheit.
 

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Yeah, quite possibly. I would gas max 300°F, since it won't be much more than fluid temp in the valve bodies.
 

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How's it going? Any progress?

As title says...
Local service company (dealer is long way away) drained Transmission fluid, instead of Engine Oil.
Followed by adding required engine oil to already oil full engine.
For what it is worth, service company did successfully change engine oil filter.


Amazingly, Subaru Ascent ran several miles without a hint of problems.
Then came first sign of problems, a slight whining noise from right front. Still Subaru drove on.

Followed by all sorts of warning lights, Check Engine, Temp warning on transmission, Brakes, Rear assist braking, Eyesight system disabled, Vehicle stability(?) failure, etc.

Next was randomly intermittent brief screech noise from right rear tire area. Accompanied by a jitter of Ascent.


Naturally, I am very concerned about CVT being permanently damaged having been run without fluid. Along with engine being damaged due to being 4-quarts over-filled. Over filling at least on engines where crank ends up slapping oil, causes oil to froth (air bubbles). Resulting in damage to bearings. Possibly piston rings and turbo-charger.

Question is: Anyone had same mistake made and what was outcome?

PS: This is not Subaru's fault in anyway. Local service company is totally responsible. They have changed oil & filter before without problems. This time, a new hire did work, and messed up big time.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Local Subaru dealer checked out Transmission as best as can be done, with transmission still on Ascent. Dealer said there were no trouble codes showing.

As a precaution, out of my pocket, I had dealer replace transmission fluid (& filter?). Then test drive the Ascent for several days. No problems showed up.

I have Ascent Limited back and I am slowly working up to longer distances from home. Being cautious about current bitter cold weather, and having to sit for a tow should transmission fail.

Subaru Corporation (again not Subaru's fault at all); can not write a letter at this time saying the Transmission is or isn't covered under factory or extended warranty. Subaru Corporation is saying, should Transmission fail, at that time the transmission will be fully inspected and should it be determined the cause of failure is tied back to fluid being drained out, then Subaru can write a letter of no coverage.

As for place that messed up. It seems their attitude is Meh! Basically coming down to: Our mechanic found nothing wrong, transmission is working, and your vehicle is drive-able.

I have spoken with a lawyer about situation. It comes down to wait and see, or take Ascent Limited to 3rd-party and see what their mechanic says. I gave up on 3rd-party route, because Subaru dealer couldn't find anything wrong.

Should transmission fail, and Subaru says it is due to fluid being drained out, thus voiding warranty; I plan to pay to have transmission replaced. Followed by engaging a law firm. With orders to law firm a partial settlement will not be accepted. Only full cost of repairs, lawyer fees, and punitive damages will keep local shop out of court.

Again, thanks to all Replies!
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Robert,

I know you noticed my label posting below so I wanted to follow up with you on a technical issue.
I really like your label idea. Being I can weld, I have thought about making a metal plate to cover transmission drain plug which says: Do Not Remove! / Under penalty of 💀
 

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You're being way too nice. :/ Even paying to have the fluid changed back to factory out of your pocket? That was what, like $300? They potentially voided your warranty coverage and you're going to wait and see? If they're 'meh' now, they're going to care even less years down the road when damage becomes evident.

I'll say it again.

Nope nope nope. I'd settle for nothing less than a new CVT and maybe engine. Overfilled is better than empty I suppose but there could be long term effects on either component you won't know about until years from now.
It's your car and situation though so deal with it how you like. I just feel bad that this is such a headache for you in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
They potentially voided your warranty coverage and you're going to wait and see? If they're 'meh' now, they're going to care even less years down the road when damage becomes evident.
I realize that. Problem is my lawyer is telling me, I have no evidence of damage. Yes, I have evidence the local service shop messed up big time. But without proof their mess up caused damage, I would get no where in court.

Instead what would come forth in court is: Local service shop's mechanic (which would be taken as expert) would testify to no signs of damage and transmission working. Followed by Subaru (highly credible expertise) saying they didn't see any signs of transmission damage, and vehicle drove fine for them.

Trying to better explain what Lawyer told me; the possibility of damage or potential for damage, would mean nothing before the court. You need to show actual damage. Warranty potentially being voided is not actual damage.

Lawyer didn't not tell me this however; I can see where court could even rule against me. Forcing me to pay their lawyer fees.
 

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Local Subaru dealer checked out Transmission as best as can be done, with transmission still on Ascent. Dealer said there were no trouble codes showing.

As a precaution, out of my pocket, I had dealer replace transmission fluid (& filter?). Then test drive the Ascent for several days. No problems showed up.

I have Ascent Limited back and I am slowly working up to longer distances from home. Being cautious about current bitter cold weather, and having to sit for a tow should transmission fail.

Subaru Corporation (again not Subaru's fault at all); can not write a letter at this time saying the Transmission is or isn't covered under factory or extended warranty. Subaru Corporation is saying, should Transmission fail, at that time the transmission will be fully inspected and should it be determined the cause of failure is tied back to fluid being drained out, then Subaru can write a letter of no coverage.

As for place that messed up. It seems their attitude is Meh! Basically coming down to: Our mechanic found nothing wrong, transmission is working, and your vehicle is drive-able.

I have spoken with a lawyer about situation. It comes down to wait and see, or take Ascent Limited to 3rd-party and see what their mechanic says. I gave up on 3rd-party route, because Subaru dealer couldn't find anything wrong.

Should transmission fail, and Subaru says it is due to fluid being drained out, thus voiding warranty; I plan to pay to have transmission replaced. Followed by engaging a law firm. With orders to law firm a partial settlement will not be accepted. Only full cost of repairs, lawyer fees, and punitive damages will keep local shop out of court.

Again, thanks to all Replies!
you will need to have all your documentation filed for that time (if it comes to be) AND there are so many mitigating factors that I doubt anything would come of it (Subaru has not torn the tranny apart but rather relied upon its drive- ability). I think Subaru is kidding themselves if a year from now, should it no longer be driveable that they could reliably determine the definitive cause to be the oil change. Certainly the service shop could easily argue that there was damaged caused during that year or more of driving and or that the tranny simply failed on its own accord (which they do). Lastly, there will be some sort of statute of limitations that hopefully your attorney reviewed with you.
 
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