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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Perusing the NHTSA reports for the 2020 Ascent I have come to the conclusion that folks just like to complain, turning it into a type of social media.

First off windshields crack for gosh sake. The nature of the beast, nature of road conditions, nature of traffic. Every vehicle, every manufacturer, every year. Get use to it and stop characterizing it as if it were a manufacturer defect (rarely is it the case). Posters to that site specifically note that they only owned the car for a short time (sometimes only days as if that mattered to the road debris. My son's car is having his windshield replaced tomorrow due to high winds picking up sand and pitting the windshield, bumper cover, headlamp lenses etc. The windshield crack phenomenon is of course is different than the cracks that appear on the glass roof panels.

Second, it is really necessary to post onto the NHTSA a bad battery? If an owner had multiple bad batteries in their vehicle then I can see posting it as a possible underlying issue (one that 2019 Ascent owners are familiar with).

Rust on the metal window trim complaint and specifically how an individual dealer dealt with it. If an owner can not negotiate this issue with the dealer then maybe they ought limit their transportation expenditures to scooters.

Many of the items posted (not all) are indeed warranty items and have been and or should be taken care of by Subaru but many do not in my opinion warrant posting to the NHTSA website. Subaru should and does track these items but does not need the NHTSA to inform them of these issues. SOA gets the information directly from dealers and owners.
 

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I agree that it's almost become like a social media sounding board.

Subaru is involved in a class action lawsuit regarding the cracked windshields. I would not say this is common (I've never heard of windshields cracking on their own), and I also don't know if it's a real issue with Subaru or not. I know only that a suit has been brought against them. I presume it'll be settled out of court as many of these things are.
 

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This is like when people give a product a bad review because it was delivered late by a third party. Some people don't know nor care where they direct their complaints, as long as they're complaining at something/someone.

It's unfortunate that we need to filter out the noise when trying to find the real information.
 

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You can read all about the windshield lawsuit there. Subaru filed a motion for dismissal due to jurisdictional grounds, but that motion was denied. The judge did dismiss some of the claims on the part of the plaintiffs. How far this goes, and whether any of it is legitimate, I guess remains to be seen.

I think the original intent of the NHTSA complaints forum was for safety-related items that a manufacturer was sweeping under the rug. Something like malfunctioning brakes where the dealer is telling the vehicle owner to just "go away." I think it's a great vehicle (pun not intended) for consumers to report this type of behavior directly to the regulating agency -- it gives the customer a voice.

I think we've seen, however, how "having a voice" can sometimes be sorely abused.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The class action attorneys fish with these suits with all the manufacturers. Cracking winshield ar
I agree that it's almost become like a social media sounding board.

Subaru is involved in a class action lawsuit regarding the cracked windshields. I would not say this is common (I've never heard of windshields cracking on their own), and I also don't know if it's a real issue with Subaru or not. I know only that a suit has been brought against them. I presume it'll be settled out of court as many of these things are.
Class action attorneys fish with these lawsuits with all manufacturers. Cracking windshields are very common, particularly in places with large temp swings and lots of traffic
 

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Went thru 4 windshields with an additional 3 times getting chips fixed on my 2018 Outback. Its definitely a problem with the modern Subaru's. But the same thing happened to Toyota in 2005-2008ish. That lead to a class action lawsuit also. Quite a few of the Japanese makers have had this problem, from reports I've heard they're all buying from the same supplier. The problem with the latest Subaru's seems to be the Eyesite and the need to keep it aligned. 1700 miles and no problems at all with my new Ascent. The weekly chicken sacrifices to the road gods seem to be helping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Went thru 4 windshields with an additional 3 times getting chips fixed on my 2018 Outback. Its definitely a problem with the modern Subaru's. But the same thing happened to Toyota in 2005-2008ish. That lead to a class action lawsuit also. Quite a few of the Japanese makers have had this problem, from reports I've heard they're all buying from the same supplier. The problem with the latest Subaru's seems to be the Eyesite and the need to keep it aligned. 1700 miles and no problems at all with my new Ascent. The weekly chicken sacrifices to the road gods seem to be helping.
The only way to avoid chips is to not drive. Chip repair needs to be completed within the next days time.. the sooner the better for it to be effective.. There is no problem with eyesight. Cameras need a clear view. My insurance covers the re calibration.
 

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I’ve had 6 windshields replaced from vehicles with cameras in the window which say they need calibration. If you tell you insurance you will only use OEM glass then chances are you will not need a recalibration. I have never needed one on the Subaru or my Toyota.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I’ve had 6 windshields replaced from vehicles with cameras in the window which say they need calibration. If you tell you insurance you will only use OEM glass then chances are you will not need a re-calibration. I have never needed one on the Subaru or my Toyota.
When I replaced my Ascent windshield per Subaru I replaced it with OEM (at that time and even now I believe only OEM even existed). Since my insurance was covering the replacement and Subaru requires the re-calibration, I went ahead and had it done. My financial contribution to this was my deductible of $250 regardless of the scope of work so it was not costing me any extra for the recalibration. I had a few days to drive it after the replacement but prior to the re-calibration and found that eyesight seemed to work just fine. Due to liability I thought it was in my best interest to assure that eyesight was re-calibrated so if an accident occurred that somehow involved eyesight, I would not be taking on any additional legal liability. From a safety standpoint my few day eyesight testing could not determine whether eyesight was going to function properly as designed in all conditions per design. In other words, it may have worked fine under the limited circumstances I put it through but not in others. I therefore took this opportunity to get it re-calibrated and not wait until it potentially failed me when I needed it and also I would then have to pay for it out of pocket.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

You can read all about the windshield lawsuit there. Subaru filed a motion for dismissal due to jurisdictional grounds, but that motion was denied. The judge did dismiss some of the claims on the part of the plaintiffs. How far this goes, and whether any of it is legitimate, I guess remains to be seen.

I think the original intent of the NHTSA complaints forum was for safety-related items that a manufacturer was sweeping under the rug. Something like malfunctioning brakes where the dealer is telling the vehicle owner to just "go away." I think it's a great vehicle (pun not intended) for consumers to report this type of behavior directly to the regulating agency -- it gives the customer a voice.

I think we've seen, however, how "having a voice" can sometimes be sorely abused.
If you read the judges ruling you will see that the express warranty and some implied warranty claims were in fact dismissed. the claims had to have been presented to Subaru, not some third party glass business. In addition, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act claims were dismissed due to not following the act requirements. Dismissal on other grounds were denied but not for any finding of fact of a defect but rather jurisdictional grounds.

as you might expect law firms who handle class action suits attempt at garnering the widest class possible so they can earn the largest fee possible. It is definitely a legal niche. You Ain't Successful until You've Put on Your Class Action Suit
I have no opinion on the merits of the writers specifi case. I offer the link only on the general issue of class action lawsuits.
 

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To re-calibrated eyesight at my local Subaru $119.95 ...
I did not ask if you still have to pay if calibration fail and you don't have OEM glass...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
To re-calibrated eyesight at my local Subaru $119.95 ...
I did not ask if you still have to pay if calibration fail and you don't have OEM glass...
that is inexpensive compared to what I have paid at my dealership. Subaru suggests OEM glass and I have not heard that non OEM is available for the higher trim levels (Limited and Touring which have added features built into the glass), so it is a good question. First off I would expect the dealership or whomever is completing the re-calibration to determine if in fact it can be done given the non OEM glass (they would have to inspect the glass quality). That should be determined prior to even getting going on the calibration. If they determine it can be done, then any failure and re-calibration costs for correction would be on them.
 
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