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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I actually set out to buy an Outback a couple of months ago. I sold my 25 year old Legacy Outback last year and regretted selling it. We are preparing for retirementl. Our other cars, a 2001 Chevy Tahoe is doing week, but to make it another 20 years? Then we have a 2013 Nissan Altima with a lot of miles. As you see we keep cars a long time.

I finally jumped in to buy the Outback in the end of June. However, I couldn’t find any. I was going to order, but Subaru stopped allowing orders for a while. On July 4th I got a call from my salesman about an Ascent. My husband asked me if I had considered it. The Ascent was the Touring as I wanted on the Outback so yes, I wanted it. I was not able to until the 5th.
But it sold just before they closed-on the 4th.

We had an appointment on the 5th. As we pulled up this beautiful Magnetite Gray Ascent was parked outside the front door. The saleman met us at the door to tell is we couldn’t order. So, my husband says, What about that one? They had just parked it there. We just loved it. To me it doesn't matter it’s not a touring. It has so much on it already.the moonroof is breath taking.

I am learning to drive it. I find I have to touch the gas petal very light or the gas mileage is horrible. It started at 8.4 mpg and increases to 14 for my first tank.second tank is betternow it is settling around 20 Mph. Is this normal as you break it in. Will I always have to be thinking about my foot on the gas petal?

i just wanted to introduce myself.
Car Wheel Tire Vehicle Plant
 

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Welcome! Our 22 Ascent took several 1000 miles to realize good mpg. I don't mash the go pedal, but I don't baby it either. I'm quite satisfied now. 19-21 around town (somewhat rural) and up to 29 mpg at 62-63 mph. These are hand calculated numbers. Others here have stated similar or even a tad more
 

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Congrats on your new Ascent.

The fuel economy reading from the vehicle's computer is a running average, so what you observed is expected. 20 mpg for general driving is not atypical for many of us, but the mix of stop/go and highway/no-stop rural will affect what "your" general average it. Terrain and weather also come into play.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I guess I was hoping for better. Out Tahoe gets 18 at it’s best and 14 at worst. The Altima we have gotten 40 on the highway. Thank you!
 

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You will ALWAYS get a lower indication for short distance/time because again, it's a running average. At the very least, it's best to calculate actual mileage manually as you refill the tank to full with the miles since the last fill to full. The onboard system is good for a general indication, especially over time. For example, my Ascent is currently showing 19.3 as the running average. That's lower than it used to be when we lived farther out of town, but trips are not shorter. "Most folks" are going to have a general overall average of about 19-20 mpg on the Ascent. Heavy urban drivers will get lower. Folks who spend a lot more time driving "uninterrupted" and at steady speeds either on regular local roads or on the Interstate will get more. For highway travel, the range (in general) seems to be 24-27 mpg, depending on the driver, terraine /weather and the speed they choose to drive. I typically get not quite 27 on the highway when traveling...not heavily loaded with one or two people in the vehicle and with speeds of 65-70 mph. I rarely drive at speeds above 70 mph unless I'm actively passing someone and need to do so for time/safety reasons.

Remember, the Ascent is a nearly two and a half ton vehicle in the shape of a brick. It's not going to be as efficient as a small sedan that sits low to the ground and weighs almost a half ton less.
 
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Average speed is between 70-95 mph.
That right there...is why you only got 19. When you get in those speeds well above 72-75, a vehicle will get very thirsty just trying to move the brick through the air.
 
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^^^ in addition to being a brick, the opposing forces of nature become somewhat exponential as speed increases. That's why crossing the 200 mph barrier is limited to very few rides. We have two of them 🙂

2K rpm also seems to be a barrier of sorts for many vehicles. Of course tranny gearing, FDR, and engine power have a large bearing here
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I am learning and not great with Physics. What do you mean by the barrier of 2k rpms. Being a new car I am doing my best to keep my
Rpms under 3k rpms. So, are you saying once the car is broken in continue to keep at 2k rpms for better gas mileage?
 

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The Ascent uses turbo charging to provide the level of power necessary to move it with good performance with its 2.4 litre four cylinder engine. When you spool RPM above the 2000-2500 mark, it starts to eat fuel (like any turbo would) at a much more rapid rate. Driving conservatively and not exercising the skinny pedal a lot to the point it's at 2k or below is a good habit. As many of us have found, it will accelerate surprisingly well, even with that more conservative approach because of how it develops torque better than a non-turbo vehicle. Setting the cruise control system to the "Eco" setting provides similar benefits when using ACC on the highway, too. Less aggressive acceleration is your friend when it comes to fuel economy. A lot of folks coming from other vehicles really struggle with this.
 
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@Joeybz ..Jim's explanation above is a good one. 2K RPM in 'high' gear seems to the dividing line for many vehicles and mpg. .. The power needed is seriously multiplied with increasing speed.. Especially when aerodynamics don't favor the Ascent or any full size SUV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The Ascent uses turbo charging to provide the level of power necessary to move it with good performance with its 2.4 litre four cylinder engine. When you spool RPM above the 2000-2500 mark, it starts to eat fuel (like any turbo would) at a much more rapid rate. Driving conservatively and not exercising the skinny pedal a lot to the point it's at 2k or below is a good habit. As many of us have found, it will accelerate surprisingly well, even with that more conservative approach because of how it develops torque better than a non-turbo vehicle. Setting the cruise control system to the "Eco" setting provides similar benefits when using ACC on the highway, too. Less aggressive acceleration is your friend when it comes to fuel economy. A lot of folks coming from other vehicles really struggle with this.
Hello there. Fellow Subaru and Ascent n00b here. Got my '22 Ascent 3 days ago. Love it so far.
Enjoy! It’s been 4 weeks for me. I finally drove in the dark the other night. The more I drive it I love how smooth and easy it is to stay within the speed limit. Learning lightness on the petal. And her I thought I was. It’s just so even.We have an Altima that is so easy to speed so this is so nice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
@Joeybz ..Jim's explanation above is a good one. 2K RPM in 'high' gear seems to the dividing line for many vehicles and mpg. .. The power needed is seriously multiplied with increasing speed.. Especially when aerodynamics don't favor the Ascent or any full size SUV.
The Ascent uses turbo charging to provide the level of power necessary to move it with good performance with its 2.4 litre four cylinder engine. When you spool RPM above the 2000-2500 mark, it starts to eat fuel (like any turbo would) at a much more rapid rate. Driving conservatively and not exercising the skinny pedal a lot to the point it's at 2k or below is a good habit. As many of us have found, it will accelerate surprisingly well, even with that more conservative approach because of how it develops torque better than a non-turbo vehicle. Setting the cruise control system to the "Eco" setting provides similar benefits when using ACC on the highway, too. Less aggressive acceleration is your friend when it comes to fuel economy. A lot of folks coming from other vehicles really struggle with this.
I am starting to find it easier to be lighter on the petal. I have been working at keeping it lower since I was told to keep it under 3k during engine break in. This is making sense to me. I tend to be aware of the gage that tells me how I am doing moment to moment. The car is making me think of my Japanese Professional flute I bought last year. Those Japanese and their precision. If you over do it doesnt do as it was built to do.
 

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Good morning. We have a 2021 Ascent Limited. We have had 4 other Subarus, all Outbacks. Two with the 2.6 motor and two with the 3.6. I learned to adjust my driving habits to maximize my MPG. I have a little over 8,600 miles on the Ascent and my overall average is 26.6 mpg. I learned to "feather" the gas pedal to avoid too much gas at the start. I also get to the desired speed quickly without crowding the gas pedal. Once the desired speed is reached, I look for
opportunities to let off the gas pedal a little and this makes all the difference in the gas mileage. This all takes a little getting use to but it save a lot of gas station stops. I get better mileage than my wife does with her 3.6 Outback.

Hope this helps.
 
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