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2019 Ascent, we have owned since June 2019, new off the dealer lot. On my way to dr. appointment and low tire light came on. Went to local Discount Tire and found screw in the tire. No big deal, right? They can fix in no time and we will be on our way. WRONG ! Found all 4 tires to be in dangerous area of low tread depth. As we were surprised to say the least, when asked the technician how this could be possible with under 20K miles he was also surprised but said dealer may have put used tires on the vehicle !!! Has anybody ever heard of such a thing ?
 

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2021 Subaru Ascent Touring
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What is the actual tread depth?
Edit, you can also check the date on the tires, obviously they will be manufactured before the vehicle but it would be interesting to see by how much.
 

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2020 Ascent Limited
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I always got terrible mileage (19-21K miles max) on OEM tires on my 4 Subaru Forester XTs (2010, 2011, 2014, and 2017). That scenario was a combination of garbage tires off the lot and the owner (me) driving it like it was a WRX (well, it sorta was ... just a little bigger ;) ). Your 18,407 miles DOES sound very early.

I now have a 2020 Limited purchased in May of 2020 with original OEM tires, and I just recently passed inspection. I have 26,650 miles on the car and am pleasantly surprised the tires have lasted this long. I'll need to replace them sooner than later, but if I can get 30k out of them, I will be more than happy. I have had tires rotated every 6,000 miles and I get the reports from the dealer every time (they have that machine you drive over that measures tread).

With these bigger, and heavier, cars it is even more dependent on driving conditions and driving styles. I remember long ago when I was in college and had a '97 Mustang GT ... and drove it like a Mustang GT. The very first time I had to replace the Z-rated tires (and it wasn't long) was an instant moment of clarity and maturity washing over me. From then on I drove it like a Corolla, with only a few exceptions here and there!
 

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I always got terrible mileage (19-21K miles max) on OEM tires on my 4 Subaru Forester XTs (2010, 2011, 2014, and 2017). That scenario was a combination of garbage tires off the lot and the owner (me) driving it like it was a WRX (well, it sorta was ... just a little bigger ;) ). Your 18,407 miles DOES sound very early.

I now have a 2020 Limited purchased in May of 2020 with original OEM tires, and I just recently passed inspection. I have 26,650 miles on the car and am pleasantly surprised the tires have lasted this long. I'll need to replace them sooner than later, but if I can get 30k out of them, I will be more than happy. I have had tires rotated every 6,000 miles and I get the reports from the dealer every time (they have that machine you drive over that measures tread).

With these bigger, and heavier, cars it is even more dependent on driving conditions and driving styles. I remember long ago when I was in college and had a '97 Mustang GT ... and drove it like a Mustang GT. The very first time I had to replace the Z-rated tires (and it wasn't long) was an instant moment of clarity and maturity washing over me. From then on I drove it like a Corolla, with only a few exceptions here and there!
I replaced the oem with continental at 30k miles.
 

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I do not think your dealer put used tires on your car. The OEM Falkens have a very short life. Most folks get a little over 20K miles but your mileage does not surprise me. If you look at the treadwear rating it is very low and you should not expect a long life out of them. We have all been there, done that and got the T-shirt.
 

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2022 Ascent Onyx, Ice Silver
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2019 , 29k, still have 6/32. Owned it since July 2018. I rotate it every 5k with oil change. They seem okay to me.
Seems to be luck of the draw, or perhaps driving style (aggressive or mild, mostly in town or interstate). I recall one post on Facebook where the OEMs would not pass inspection at 12K miles, go figure.
 

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2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
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It can also be affected by local road surfaces and what they are made of....so many variables. But in general OEM tires on most vehicles are not "long life" tires. They are chosen for cost, fuel economy and comfort. Basically, boring, too. :D
 

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2021 Subaru Ascent Touring
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They are chosen for cost, fuel economy and comfort. Basically, boring, too. :D
Most high performance tires are much lower treadwear rating and much quicker to wear than our OEM tires and I wouldn’t call them boring. Generally harder compound means longer life but lower traction.
 

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2022 Ascent Onyx, Ice Silver
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Most high performance tires are much lower treadwear rating and much quicker to wear than our OEM tires and I wouldn’t call them boring. Generally harder compound means longer life but lower traction.
And the purchasing agent writes the specs, and apparently, Falken was the low bidder. I don't know how many hundreds of thousands of tires Subaru buys, but a buck or two per tire adds up. Same with their batteries.
 

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2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
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Most high performance tires are much lower treadwear rating and much quicker to wear than our OEM tires and I wouldn’t call them boring. Generally harder compound means longer life but lower traction.
No argument there. The OEM tires...are "just tires" however. :) Performance tires are made to be "grippy" which like winter tires, means softer and faster wear.
 

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Seems to be luck of the draw, or perhaps driving style (aggressive or mild, mostly in town or interstate). I recall one post on Facebook where the OEMs would not pass inspection at 12K miles, go figure.
I live in the pnw, the roads are pitted and full of aggregate. It's not smooth like CA or other places. Driving style does matter. I start slow at stop lights and don't drive fast or aggressive around corners etc, plus I rotate my tires all the time.
 

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I live in the pnw, the roads are pitted and full of aggregate. It's not smooth like CA or other places. Driving style does matter. I start slow at stop lights and don't drive fast or aggressive around corners etc, plus I rotate my tires all the time.
I'm sure your conservative & aware driving style has much to do with good tire wear. From my experience (800 miles), I felt "cheated" by the substandard performance of the OEM tires. It was a day & night difference after switching to the 18" wheels and Michelin CC2 tires. 7200+ miles on the odo now with the better tires and I don't look back.

I spent $45K on a car and didn't want entry-level tires to ruin the new car honeymoon. On occasion, I'll engage in semi-spirited driving, and the experience is more rewarding on the Michelin tires compared to the OEMs. (y)
 

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I'm sure your conservative & aware driving style has much to do with good tire wear. From my experience (800 miles), I felt "cheated" by the substandard performance of the OEM tires. It was a day & night difference after switching to the 18" wheels and Michelin CC2 tires. 7200+ miles on the odo now with the better tires and I don't look back.

I spent $45K on a car and didn't want entry-level tires to ruin the new car honeymoon. On occasion, I'll engage in semi-spirited driving, and the experience is more rewarding on the Michelin tires compared to the OEMs. (y)
 

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We are new to the Subaru family, but OEM tires don't have to suck. New GMC, F150, Yukon, and an Acadia, and never changed tires under 45k. Dealer told us last oil change they wont rotate again, and currently at 21k miles. Have not read the actual tread depth, but that is pretty low to me. The Ascent is my wife's and she got 80k out of a set of Michelins on a Yukon, so it is not like she is street racing light to light. Price wise, they are not the cheapest replacement in the batch of tires either. I have had full blown mud tires outlast these and I know they are going to wear out quickly. Anyway, glad I could add to the rant of the day.
 

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I'm sure your conservative & aware driving style has much to do with good tire wear. From my experience (800 miles), I felt "cheated" by the substandard performance of the OEM tires. It was a day & night difference after switching to the 18" wheels and Michelin CC2 tires. 7200+ miles on the odo now with the better tires and I don't look back.

I spent $45K on a car and didn't want entry-level tires to ruin the new car honeymoon. On occasion, I'll engage in semi-spirited driving, and the experience is more rewarding on the Michelin tires compared to the OEMs. (y)
I agree with you completely. I had to replace the Zieix tires at 24K miles on my 2019 Ascent Touring as they failed Pennsylvania inspection. With Continental tires, it rides differently, much smoother, gets better highway mileage and is quieter. And the Conti's hardy wear at all. My last SUV I got 65K out of a set of Continentals.
 

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2019 Ascent Touring with all the bells & whistles
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The OEM tires on my '19 Outback wore down in 22K miles. I complained, as this same tire purchased at retail was warranted for 50K or 60K miles. The warranty did not apply to OEM tires though. The dealer (Granite Subaru in Hudson, NH) helped me open a case with SOA and I got a $500 allowance towards a new set.
 

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Lots of good ideas here. I'd like to add that the low tire pressure light doesn't come on until they are significantly underinflated. Running them underinflated also lowers the tread life. FYI, it also increases the odds of punctures, including unfixable ones.

I have 32k on my Ascent's OEM tires, and they are still going strong. I expect to get 40-50k out of them. I do all the good things mentioned in this thread and none of the bad.

I never let my tires get more than 3 psi from 33. I add air in the fall/winter and let out air in the spring/summer. I'm about to add some air in them this week with the summer heat finally gone.

Owning a small portable air compressor that I paid $35 for, makes this convenient. I believe it's paid for itself with longer tread life and being able to add enough air in my tires to get to the tire shop for a repair when they've had a puncture.
 
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