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This vehicle was not ready for prime time
I thoroughly disagree, and so do my 46,860 miles, which includes thousands of brutal off road miles. 😉
2624
 

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looks like classic alternator (not enough voltage somewhere )issues .with those computerized cars if u have glitch in the voltage all goes to garbage......ben there with tribeca.... still love that fat slow lady.
when I did headgasket on mine first subaru(1998 outback 230000and running strong) I invented a rule : U love them ,till headgasket fail;u fix it.. an love em next 200000K.....LOL! good luck!
 

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Car was at the dealer for six weeks. Replaced the transmission at no cost. They gave us no update until suddenly it was in and it was done. I am happy they gave us a loaner for that time, and it was a fairly painless hassle, but I think this is our last subaru. You can't flub like that and get away with it. We will see if we get another 4 pain-free years.
 

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Car was at the dealer for six weeks. Replaced the transmission at no cost. They gave us no update until suddenly it was in and it was done. I am happy they gave us a loaner for that time, and it was a fairly painless hassle, but I think this is our last subaru. You can't flub like that and get away with it. We will see if we get another 4 pain-free years.
When they first took the car in how long did they say it would take? Did their noted time frame approximately match the outcome? If they said it would take two months and it was completed sooner then I see no issue. If they said less than six weeks then they should have contacted you. If were me and it was the latter scenario, I would have contact them a couple of days after the promised time frame to check on the status as well as clearly express my expectations. If I thought their response was not appropriate, I would have been in touch with SOA as well as be looking for another dealer.
 

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They had no idea, and that was the problem. The estimated time was "As soon as we get a replacement transmission, plus a day". I don't fault the dealer- as soon as they got a transmission, the car was ready a day later. Subaru dicked us around for 6 weeks waiting for a transmission to even be shipped. If you can't supply your year old car with parts, then I've got to wonder what's going wrong in your organization...I understand three months in when demand was insane, but they couldn't tell us when the car would be ready because subaru couldn't tell them when they would ship a transmission.

So, we are lucky that this was all under warranty on a new car with a dealer loaner available, but the cost would be astronomical if we were out of warranty and had to spend six weeks in a rental. With my penchant for buying the weirdest cars possible, I can only imagine how hard it would be to find a replacement part.
 

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No denying the CVT issue/recall was pretty epic for a company the size of Subaru. I really hope they’ve learned some valuable lessons.
 

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No denying the CVT issue/recall was pretty epic for a company the size of Subaru. I really hope they’ve learned some valuable lessons.
the CVT was not recalled and there really is not anything wrong with the CVT. It was the harness and the reason some CVTs had to be replaced was due to problems other parts caused that led to the CVT failure. The supply challenge has to do with the fact those replacements come right off the assembly line used to build the new vehicles. It is a supply balancing act for sure. The fact is both the harness problem impacted a tiny percentage of the vehicles made (mine was one and only after 19000 miles). The CVT was even fewer. Given the parts supply chain I am not sure what lessons can be learned. Subaru has established a very high standard for defective parts and contracted that with their suppliers. As the parts become more and more sophisticated and the demand grows it becomes more and more difficult to maintain that standard. I think they have done a wonderful job at it. A bit of reading the news will clearly show no manufacturer is exempt from these challenges.
 

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the CVT was not recalled and there really is not anything wrong with the CVT. It was the harness and the reason some CVTs had to be replaced was due to problems other parts caused that led to the CVT failure. The supply challenge has to do with the fact those replacements come right off the assembly line used to build the new vehicles. It is a supply balancing act for sure. The fact is both the harness problem impacted a tiny percentage of the vehicles made (mine was one and only after 19000 miles). The CVT was even fewer. Given the parts supply chain I am not sure what lessons can be learned. Subaru has established a very high standard for defective parts and contracted that with their suppliers. As the parts become more and more sophisticated and the demand grows it becomes more and more difficult to maintain that standard. I think they have done a wonderful job at it. A bit of reading the news will clearly show no manufacturer is exempt from these challenges.
Yep - well aware of the harness issue being the cause of the CVT failures. That harness design was a 101 dissimilar metal composition no-no that never should’ve made it past concept - hopefully they learned their lesson.
 

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Yep - well aware of the harness issue being the cause of the CVT failures. That harness design was a 101 dissimilar metal composition no-no that never should’ve made it past concept - hopefully they learned their lesson.
interesting. where did you learn that information?
 

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Read page 2 “Description of the cause”

They mixed Copper and Tin Plate harness connectors together in a resistance-sensitive application.
Something you just DO NOT do, ever.
Okay, I had my transmission control valve body replaced some months ago but according to the dealer the resistance was checked on the harness and was fine. Now the christmas lights are on again and codes were detected so they are replacing the harness. How might this delay in replacing the harness have negatively impacted the CVT, if at all? If it might have, what suggestions would you offer for testing to see if it was indeed impacted?
 

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Okay, I had my transmission control valve body replaced some months ago but according to the dealer the resistance was checked on the harness and was fine. Now the christmas lights are on again and codes were detected so they are replacing the harness. How might this delay in replacing the harness have negatively impacted the CVT, if at all? If it might have, what suggestions would you offer for testing to see if it was indeed impacted?
The recall reflashes the TCM, which I believe provides additional sensor logic, which gives the techs the ability to see if the CVT has ever slipped. It is supposed to have a code if it has. If it threw a code, they are required to replace your trans. I’m suspect of any dealer’s ability to truly test resistance on the harness correctly. I don’t think it’s as simple as hooking up a multimeter and measuring impedence/resistance. In short, I’m not exactly sure what they’ll do in your case, but I would demand a detailed explanation of their testing process to see if the trans has ever slipped. It’s all clearly detailed out on their end and you’re entitled to that information.
 

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Read page 2 “Description of the cause”

They mixed Copper and Tin Plate harness connectors together in a resistance-sensitive application.
Something you just DO NOT do, ever.
Not enough sleep. I misread the description and interpreted it incorrectly that it was the tinning itself that was the cause when in fact it was dissimilar connectors (one tinned and one not). It is bizzare to see that was missed by so many. For those interested in what tinning is all about see below.




Copper oxidizes and the oxides do not stay on the copper well. When they come off there is more copper exposed, which in turn oxidizes, and so-on. Also the oxides do not conduct well. This causes poor electrical contact, which then gets hot and increases the oxidation rate. The oxides, because of their poor conductivity, also cause arcing at the electrical contacts, eroding the copper.

Tin plating has two main technical advantages:

1. The thin tin oxide film (10-30 nm) forms on the surface of the tin coating could act as a shield, inhibiting further oxidation; and

2. Being a relatively soft metal, tin provides a low constriction resistance.







Fretting problems degradation
 

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Yep - well aware of the harness issue being the cause of the CVT failures. That harness design was a 101 dissimilar metal composition no-no that never should’ve made it past concept - hopefully they learned their lesson.
I can't disagree with any of that. Engineering mistakes happen though no matter how many eyes and checks you employ. I deal with them first hand for a living. Sadly for Subaru this relatively small mistake had a large impact.
 

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I can't disagree with any of that. Engineering mistakes happen though no matter how many eyes and checks you employ. I deal with them first hand for a living. Sadly for Subaru this relatively small mistake had a large impact.
I just picked up my ascent from having the harness replaced. Stall test was performed two weeks prior for updates. No problem. So I guess I do not need a cvt.
 
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