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FWIW, I'm satisfied with the mileage I get, which is ~18 mpg on suburban surface streets, 22 mixed, and mid to upper 20s on the highway. If I mindfully drive with a light foot, I can do somewhat better. I can get worse if I get jiggy with it.
 

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I have the 2019 Limited version which i have driven a little over 18K now and have NEVER gotten anything above 18 mpg. I started at 13 to 15 mpg when the truck was new and it improved to 18 but no more. I brought that up during my last service (18k) but the dealership didn't want anything to do with what the "sales guys" told me. According to them the typical is 18 mpg and that is about it. I showed him what was listed on the website including that it is rated and recommended for regular gas (he wanted me to try premium). They ran a check and found nothing. I am in San Jose, CA and use Chevron gas. I have mixed driving between city and highway but it does not make much of a difference, I have taken long road trips on it also. Speed change to 65 mph helped a little but as i said, i am capped at 18 mpg. Any ideas? I have not made any changes to the truck and only have cross bars on top. Stock tires and rims.
I have a 2020 with 10,000 miles , City milage is horrible , probably about 18 , but highway milage is consistent at 27-28 . The key with the CVT is to keep the engine rpms down so it can operate at a taller gear ratio . The turbo engine has plenty of torque so there is no need to us high engine rpm to accelerate quickly .
 

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I have the 2019 Limited version which i have driven a little over 18K now and have NEVER gotten anything above 18 mpg. I started at 13 to 15 mpg when the truck was new and it improved to 18 but no more. I brought that up during my last service (18k) but the dealership didn't want anything to do with what the "sales guys" told me. According to them the typical is 18 mpg and that is about it. I showed him what was listed on the website including that it is rated and recommended for regular gas (he wanted me to try premium). They ran a check and found nothing. I am in San Jose, CA and use Chevron gas. I have mixed driving between city and highway but it does not make much of a difference, I have taken long road trips on it also. Speed change to 65 mph helped a little but as i said, i am capped at 18 mpg. Any ideas? I have not made any changes to the truck and only have cross bars on top. Stock tires and rims.
Drove from Chambersburg, PA to Rochester, NY and return last week. For this 900 mile trip, I averaged close to 26 mpg. I kept it around 60 mph the whole way, as it is mostly highway. Of course, if I am just taking a short trip in the city, I have gotten 15 mpg.
 

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Average mpg + 6. Due to having to use my donut spare on my Limited for my morning 1 hour commute, I drove at a consistant 45 mph. My average mpg for this commute increased by 6 mpg. The speed limit for the drive is 55 - 75 mph. It was a two coffee mug commute. Two dark to see the glaring faces of other drivers.
 

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I have a 2020 with 10,000 miles , City milage is horrible , probably about 18 , but highway milage is consistent at 27-28 . The key with the CVT is to keep the engine rpms down so it can operate at a taller gear ratio . The turbo engine has plenty of torque so there is no need to us high engine rpm to accelerate quickly .
Technically, the key is keeping the boost at 0psi or below as much as possible. Boost starts dumping the fuel. This is a bit more difficult for some not accustomed to turbo charged cars and the fact Subaru shanked us on a factory boost gauge (shakes fists).
I’ve owned so many turbo Subaru’s, I know when the turbo starts to spool and how to stay out of boost (even with the CVT). This is critical for cold engines. Stay out of boost for as long as possible.
Boost is less tied to rpm and more tied to load on the engine + throttle position. You can dump a lot of fuel and have tons of boost hit at lower rpms, depending on what you’re asking the car to do.

Or, you just drive the thing normally, enjoy the performance and don’t worry about mpgs. :)
 

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Technically, the key is keeping the boost at 0psi or below as much as possible. Boost starts dumping the fuel. This is a bit more difficult for some not accustomed to turbo charged cars and the fact Subaru shanked us on a factory boost gauge (shakes fists).
That's something I'm wondering about, if someone has figured out how to come up with a boost gauge for this. I'm honestly not sure WHY they didn't put one on there, unless they were concerned that by doing so, it would seem to give tacit consent to modifying and tuning the engine like everyone does with the WRX and the STI. There are local shops that specifically do tunes on cars - could you imagine an Ascent, modified to 800 HP at the wheels, running on 93 or just alcohol? There are guys locally that have their STI's and WRX's modified for this.
 

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That's something I'm wondering about, if someone has figured out how to come up with a boost gauge for this. I'm honestly not sure WHY they didn't put one on there, unless they were concerned that by doing so, it would seem to give tacit consent to modifying and tuning the engine like everyone does with the WRX and the STI. There are local shops that specifically do tunes on cars - could you imagine an Ascent, modified to 800 HP at the wheels, running on 93 or just alcohol? There are guys locally that have their STI's and WRX's modified for this.
There's a growing number of apps that can do it. There's also one new app entering the iDevice world that uses SSMv4 for all the relevant data points. Steve Pitman has been sending him lots of data points and requests to add to the app.

 

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I am not sure if this is the Android version:
 

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Any guidance on which OBD plug-in devices work with this? I know in the past you recommended the OBDLink 426101 based on its associated app, I believe... Do you know how much is dependent on the scanner vs the app?
 

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I've had success monitoring vacuum/boost with Torque Lite for Android. ref: Torque Lite (OBD2 & Car) - Apps on Google Play

with a Bluetooth (ELM327 based) OBD2 device ref: Amazon.com: Panlong Bluetooth OBD2 OBDII Car Diagnostic Scanner Check Engine Light for Android - Compatible with Torque Pro: Automotive
*I took a chance on a sub $15 device and it seems to work okay. It also works with Active OBD app (android) for Trans temp funness... So far so good. Spending more on an OBD reader would reduce potential for connection drop outs and you'd likely have better odds at mobile app compatibility. Depends on how much you want to 'play with it' vs 'set and forget'.

FWIW
 

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For SSMv4 apps (and there's now one that supports some of the stuff via older protocol support, and a new one that actually supports SSMv4, I suggest something like this:
Even for basic ELM stuff, I suggest it, because it's fast.

  • Torque reads boost/vacuum and numerous other stuff (but not CVT temp).
  • ActiveODB reads CVT temp and various other things that Torque does not, but skips some basic stuff. This requires a high end dongle like the Scantools.
  • There's another app in development that now supports SSMv4 for iPhone. I am hoping the support is making its way into the Android version as well. This requires a high end dongle like the Scantools.
iOS: ‎Car Scanner ELM OBD2

Email the guy and tell him you're interested in more SSMv4 data being available in his app. Tell him me and Steve Pitman sent you.
 

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That's something I'm wondering about, if someone has figured out how to come up with a boost gauge for this.
Think about your eco-meter or whatever its called (the bargraph that displays your instantaneous mpg going up/down from average) as an inverted boost gauge. The farther left it goes the more boost you're using
 

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IDK. I feel boost kick in right off idle when starting from a stop, so it seems some is always there as long as my foot is into the pedal enough for the engine to produce exhaust gasses to spin the turbo. Getting the best mileage just takes using the minimum throttle application I can in any given situation irrespective of what the boost happens to be because it's not boost but rather the manifold pressure after the throttle plates that determines fuel usage.
 

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Any guidance on which OBD plug-in devices work with this? I know in the past you recommended the OBDLink 426101 based on its associated app, I believe... Do you know how much is dependent on the scanner vs the app?
I just installed the app and it has a recommendation.
 

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I'm usually around 22 MPG with a mix of rural, highway, and suburban, and a bit of urban driving. I've got the largest Thule box available on the roof, and I'm reasonably gentle on the throttle. I also usually drive at least 20 minutes at a time and rarely get stuck in stop and go traffic. There seems to be a huge difference in fuel economy when it is cold vs a warmed up engine. If the engine is up to temperature when I fill the tank and reset the trip odometer, I'll get 25 - 28 MPG until I park it. On the next cold start, the average starts dropping quickly. In terms of fuel economy, it really doesn't like short trips or idling in standstill traffic, or being warmed up on the remote start. If I were concerned about low fuel economy, I'd take it out for a long drive in the country and see how it does. I'd also make sure it is well broken in, having been well into the boost on some climbs. Take it out, drive it hard (assuming it isn't brand new), climb some hills a gear or two high in manual mode with the accelerator pedal bottomed out. Then fill up the tank and go for a nice relaxing drive without traffic and see what it does.
 

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That turbo can really suck gas, but if you drive lightly, you can get fantastic mileage.
This was a shot last week, on a partial trip in mixed freeway traffic, 35-80 mph and then 20 miles in San Francisco. I can repeat this at will, or drive with a lead foot and get 15mpg. I shut cruise control off on downhill and skip the automatic braking it does, reduce speed on uphills instead of letting cruise pump 8 PSI into the mainfold and several other manual management tricks.
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