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From today's USA Today:

Least frequently stolen vehicles of the 2016-18 model years, continued:

6 Subaru Legacy with EyeSight

7 GMC Acadia

8 Subaru Forester with EyeSight

9 GMC Acadia four-wheel-drive

10 Volkswagen New Beetle

11 BMW 3-series four-door fourwheel- drive

12 Subaru Outback with EyeSight

13 BMW X5

14 Subaru Crosstrek

15 Chevrolet Traverse

16 Subaru Crosstrek with EyeSight

17 Lexus RX 450h four-wheel-drive

18 Honda Odyssey

19 Mazda MX-5 Miata

20 Cadillac XT5
 

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The cynic in me wants to say something about why there are so many on the list (given my list of issues). But in all fairness, I might guess that there are more Subarus, especially the lower end/trim cars, sold with manual transmissions compared to the other cars on this list. I imagine that's why the Miata is on the list as well, in addition to being a niche market car.
 

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But in all fairness, I might guess that there are more Subarus, especially the lower end/trim cars, sold with manual transmissions compared to the other cars on this list.
You might be on to something there. I leave my ‘98 bimmer unlocked. It’s a 5 speed and I’d rather not replace the window if they don’t see that security lever in the middle before trying to break in. There’s also literally nothing worth stealing in or on the car ?
 

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Here is the top 5:

  1. BMW 3-series four-door
  2. Tesla Model S four-wheel-drive
  3. Tesla Model X four-wheel-drive
  4. Chevrolet Equinox four-wheel-drive
  5. Buick Encore four-wheel-drive
There does not seem to be any real commonalities between the vehicles on this list to make them less desirable to thieves.
 

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The “most” stolen vehicles tend to be those where the parts are the attraction. A very popular car (Toyota Camry, Honda Accord and such) tend to be the most in demand for parts. That drives the market for stolen/chop shopped vehicles.
I agree that theft is often associated with parts demand/chop shops and not whole vehicle theft. I would guess cars stolen for their intact value would be limited to high-end/luxury models that could be smuggled overseas and resold, not more basic commuter-type cars.

With that in mind, I wonder if there's any correlation with less theft and increased reliability? In other words, if the vehicle is more reliable, there's less demand for parts, and less vehicles stolen for parts.

Maybe it has something to do with Subaru OEM part prices? Although I would doubt that they are significantly cheaper than their market peers.
 
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