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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In 2021 Model Year, Subaru added Lane Centering to the Subaru Ascent. Here's the combinations of how Lane Centering and Lane Keep Assist work.

For the 2021 Model Year

  • Lane Centering is only active when the following conditions are met:
    • "Lane Assist" is on
      AND
    • Adaptive Cruise Control is on
      AND
    • Adaptive Cruise Control is actively operating

    • Lane Centering Assist systems suspend when the blinkers are activated or brakes are applied.
  • Lane Keep Assist is active when:
    • "Lane Assist" is on
      AND
    • (Adaptive Cruise Control is on AND Adaptive Cruise Control is NOT active)
      -- OR --
      Adaptive Cruise Control is OFF

    • Lane Keep Assist systems suspend when the blinkers are activated.
If Lane Centering is on and active, and the user presses the brake pedal, or otherwise turns off or suspends Adaptive Cruise Control, then Lane Centering turns off, and the vehicle reverts to Lane Keep Assist.

Lane Keep Assist does NOT ping pong the car. The driver ping pongs the car. In ALL driving assist modes, the car fully expects the driver to have their hands on the wheel and actively controlling the vehicle. With hands on wheel steering, the Lane Keep Assist function will nudge the car back into a lane, and be done with assist. With no human steering, the system will nudge the car back into lane, which may or may not point the car at the other side of the lane, causing it to nudge it back again. The ping pong effect is driver error, because the driver is forcing the car to drive, when it's not designed to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
We've been told the hardware is different.
 

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You need to come drive a section of I-5 north of Seattle with lots of truck traffic. Even this morning when I was lightly holding the wheel lightly like my motorcycle handlebars with ACC/LC, not gripping and letting the LC 'drive' with minimal input but paying attention. The LC would get confused by the deep tire grooves in the road and punt me toward the outside of the lane (stopping before exiting the lane), or punt me back and forth in the middle of the lane. I've only had it for about a week and a half and Im trying to find the sweet spot for holding the wheel because I don't want to deactivate the LC when I using the ACC. Its one of the things I like best about Eyesite. I used it all the time with my 2018 Outback with no real problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Total devil's advocate response, but who is supposed to be driving?
The driver, always, with at least one hand on the wheel. 😉

6448
 

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You need to come drive a section of I-5 north of Seattle with lots of truck traffic. Even this morning when I was lightly holding the wheel lightly like my motorcycle handlebars with ACC/LC, not gripping and letting the LC 'drive' with minimal input but paying attention. The LC would get confused by the deep tire grooves in the road and punt me toward the outside of the lane (stopping before exiting the lane), or punt me back and forth in the middle of the lane. I've only had it for about a week and a half and Im trying to find the sweet spot for holding the wheel because I don't want to deactivate the LC when I using the ACC. Its one of the things I like best about Eyesite. I used it all the time with my 2018 Outback with no real problems.
What you're experiencing following the road's worn ruts is called tramlining. Do you have 20"wheels? The larger the wheel and the lower the tire's sidewall, the more pronounced the effect. Get used to it. You'll also see pronounced tramlining braking to red lights at heavily worn intersections.
 

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2021 Ascent Touring Brilliant Bronze
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I have a few roads around me while marked appropriately are wider than normal. I find the vehicle in that circumstance chooses to stay closer to the center lane or driver's side lane markers. In those circumstances I prefer to be in the true middle of the lane as my thought process is the farther away I am from on coming traffic the better; hence, I have to turn it off otherwise the car will keep nudging me closer the drivers side lane markings. For what it is worth, the wear on the road however is typically closer to the drivers side lines.

I also drive with my hands in the 4/5 PM and 7/8 PM positions. The car does squawk at me at times to hold the steering wheel. I find a slightly tighter grip and or creep up just a bit usually solves it. If you are a one handed driver at say the 12 position, it more than likely will give you a hard time. My wife holds her hands in the traditional 10AM and 2PM and the alerts rarely goes off on her. If you are light on the steering wheel you will need to give it a tighter grip every so often.

(As a side note the heated steering areas is mainly from the 2PM to 4PM and 8PM to 10PM positions. So if you hold your hands higher or lower you will not get it or as much. Where I hold the steering wheel it is on the edges.)

As already noted, if you want to change lanes, without the vehicle "fighting" you, use your blinkers. My 2018 Outback taught me that.

On the highway it operates quite nicely following the road and staying centered.
 

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What you're experiencing following the road's worn ruts is called tramlining. Do you have 20"wheels? The larger the wheel and the lower the tire's sidewall, the more pronounced the effect. Get used to it. You'll also see pronounced tramlining braking to red lights at heavily worn intersections.
...and to continue to beat the alignment dead horse...slight toe out is within the alignment specs and WILL cause the car to feel darty and follow pavement grooves, etc. slight toe IN (still within factory specs) will make the car want to continue straight rather than change lanes if you sneeze.
 

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Great summary and info above, thanks.

Does anyone know if any advanced calibration is possible with the Lane Centering? While driving in the right lane I aim to keep the car slightly to the right, maybe 6 inches off the actual center of the lane. Usually I do this to avoid the most worn and bumpiest part of the lane, but it's also an extra margin between me and passing vehicles. Eyesight does a very good job of maintaining the lane center, but for my stated reasons, too good. I was wondering if anyone is aware of any options to offset that slightly, as 90%+ of my driving is done in the RHL.
 

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This is the first vehicle I've owned with lane centering and lane keep. It took some getting used to the first week or so as I felt the lane centering was at times trying to pull me into the other lane. After I became accustomed to the steering wheel moving on its own, I am more confident now. The other thing that took a little acclamation is the fact that lane centering will turn off if eyesight can't quite make out the lane markers. Some of the roads here have areas that really need to be re-striped, and it will turn off there. Again, took some time to realize what was going on. I questioned the dealer about this and was told you have to be going above 38 mph for lane centering to work, but I'm pretty sure I've noticed it working at slower speeds than that.
 

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In 2021 Model Year, Subaru added Lane Centering to the Subaru Ascent. Here's the combinations of how Lane Centering and Lane Keep Assist work.

For the 2021 Model Year

  • Lane Centering is only active when the following conditions are met:
    • "Lane Assist" is on
      AND
    • Adaptive Cruise Control is on
      AND
    • Adaptive Cruise Control is actively operating

    • Lane Centering Assist systems suspend when the blinkers are activated or brakes are applied.
  • Lane Keep Assist is active when:
    • "Lane Assist" is on
      AND
    • (Adaptive Cruise Control is on AND Adaptive Cruise Control is NOT active)
      -- OR --
      Adaptive Cruise Control is OFF

    • Lane Keep Assist systems suspend when the blinkers are activated.
If Lane Centering is on and active, and the user presses the brake pedal, or otherwise turns off or suspends Adaptive Cruise Control, then Lane Centering turns off, and the vehicle reverts to Lane Keep Assist.

Lane Keep Assist does NOT ping pong the car. The driver ping pongs the car. In ALL driving assist modes, the car fully expects the driver to have their hands on the wheel and actively controlling the vehicle. With hands on wheel steering, the Lane Keep Assist function will nudge the car back into a lane, and be done with assist. With no human steering, the system will nudge the car back into lane, which may or may not point the car at the other side of the lane, causing it to nudge it back again. The ping pong effect is driver error, because the driver is forcing the car to drive, when it's not designed to.
I just got a 2021 premium loaner with 760 miles on it. I look forward to my Monday highway driving using Lane Centering. I will try and report back my experience with it.
 

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I had a '21 Outback loaner with it and I was pretty impressed with how well it worked. Terrific on the interstate. It tended to keep me a little closer to the center line on a two-lane road than I preferred, but that's not really the intended use for it anyway (country roads).

I think it works ONLY if adaptive cruise control is engaged. I will sometimes have lane keep turned on in our '20 Ascent without the use of cruise control. Maybe the '21s can be configured to not use lane centering if you want to use only lane keep without cruise, I don't know.
 

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You need to come drive a section of I-5 north of Seattle with lots of truck traffic. Even this morning when I was lightly holding the wheel lightly like my motorcycle handlebars with ACC/LC, not gripping and letting the LC 'drive' with minimal input but paying attention. The LC would get confused by the deep tire grooves in the road and punt me toward the outside of the lane (stopping before exiting the lane), or punt me back and forth in the middle of the lane. I've only had it for about a week and a half and Im trying to find the sweet spot for holding the wheel because I don't want to deactivate the LC when I using the ACC. Its one of the things I like best about Eyesite. I used it all the time with my 2018 Outback with no real problems.
I am driving a 2021 Ascent loaner and have tried out the lane centering going to and coming back from work (one hour highway drives). At first the feature seemed to work well. I was impressed on how it followed the curves in the roadway. Coming back was for some reason an entirely different experience. I had lane centering active and it tended to want to hang out very close to the lane divider to my right. Certainly not centered. There were times that with a very loose hand on the steering wheel it would direct the vehicle at a steep angle to the right. Nothing gradual about it and it was scary to say the least. there was no reason at all for any of it to happen. I was in the middle of my lane. The dashed lane markers were clear as was the weather. PUNT is a good description of what happened. A sudden thrust in a direction). I have never had a problem with lane assist in my 2019 Limited.

Hopefully this can be corrected with a software update.
 

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@packout your experience is not inconsistent with other similar tales reported here. It'll be interesting to see if this is some sort of software bug in the system.
I will probably have the loaner through Wednesday so I will experiment some more and report back.

Obviously I would be mostly concerned with the abrupt movements but also with what is supposed to be a feature that reduces driver fatigue actually increases it.
 

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In 2021 Model Year, Subaru added Lane Centering to the Subaru Ascent. Here's the combinations of how Lane Centering and Lane Keep Assist work.

For the 2021 Model Year

  • Lane Centering is only active when the following conditions are met:
    • "Lane Assist" is on
      AND
    • Adaptive Cruise Control is on
      AND
    • Adaptive Cruise Control is actively operating

    • Lane Centering Assist systems suspend when the blinkers are activated or brakes are applied.
  • Lane Keep Assist is active when:
    • "Lane Assist" is on
      AND
    • (Adaptive Cruise Control is on AND Adaptive Cruise Control is NOT active)
      -- OR --
      Adaptive Cruise Control is OFF

    • Lane Keep Assist systems suspend when the blinkers are activated.
If Lane Centering is on and active, and the user presses the brake pedal, or otherwise turns off or suspends Adaptive Cruise Control, then Lane Centering turns off, and the vehicle reverts to Lane Keep Assist.

Lane Keep Assist does NOT ping pong the car. The driver ping pongs the car. In ALL driving assist modes, the car fully expects the driver to have their hands on the wheel and actively controlling the vehicle. With hands on wheel steering, the Lane Keep Assist function will nudge the car back into a lane, and be done with assist. With no human steering, the system will nudge the car back into lane, which may or may not point the car at the other side of the lane, causing it to nudge it back again. The ping pong effect is driver error, because the driver is forcing the car to drive, when it's not designed to.
Today I further explored the lane centering on my loaner 2021 Ascent. I ultimately turned it off. This was three lane highway driving on a well maintained interstate with very light traffic and good lane markings. Early morning dark sky driving at speeds ranging from 60 to 80mph. I made an attempt to figure out what I had actually experiencing driving in the yesterday morning and afternoon.

The system in this particular vehicle tended to prefer the right edge of the lane.

The system was not smooth but rather heavy handed in its adjustments. The heavy handed adjustments felt very dangerous to me. There was no reason for that extreme turning of the wheel. It felt as if the sensors were having a difficult time knowing where the center actually was and needed to reach close to either side back and forth to make that determination. My hands were on the wheel but trying not to control the steering so I know this was not my doing.

The system made adjustments when unnecessary by any reasonable standard.

When a semi truck would be on my right the system would still want to get very close to the right lane divider. This occurred even when no vehicle was on my left or I had a very large empty and marked shoulder to my left. Normally I would either remain in the center of my lane or more often provide some additional room on my right between the truck and my vehicle.

I could relax again once I turned off lane centering. Steering was easy and responsive. Very little movement of the wheel was ever necessary.

I have no idea if this is a unit issue that can be adjusted or a programming issue that is model wide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I've been meaning to try it in an Ascent, but, sadly, that's tough nowadays. I did try it in the Outback for about four weeks, and liked it.
 
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