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I purchased my Ascent in Jan 2019. New to Subaru I was looking for the something with outstanding safety factor. Of course Subaru comes to mind. I have had Toyota’s the past 3 cars and loved them for their reliability. Since I purchased the Ascent I have had issues with the push start. Sometimes the engine won’t turn over and it sounds like it’s choking. I thought it was the weather however once it started to happen after winter I figured something was wrong. Then a week ago I drove about 2 hours away from my home. When I went to turn my car on it wouldn’t turn over and wouldn’t turn off!! The battery was running but it wouldn’t start or turn off. The key fob was also not responding. Tried to turn it on from my remote app. That reported that the car was already running. SOA and roadside were not helpful. The dealer called and said they couldn’t get it to replicate what happened so they can’t figure it out. I opened a claim with SOA because the delays customer service was poor; they claim to have run all these tests and they are all fine but the last few days they said they found issues with the alternator. What to believe??? ?? has anyone experienced this with their Ascent? I don’t want it back because i don’t think it’s safe. And if I get stuck somewhere with my daughter hours away from home I’m going to livid.
 

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My experience is that the service department cannot find out what causes an electrical fault and says " lets just see if it happens again". Then when you complaint to Subaru they call the dealer and the dealer says they fixed it.
 

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There are similar reports here in the forums. On a side note all push button cars are required to have a hard shut off when you hold the button down for an extended time. This should reset the car “all” cars with push button start.

There have been cases of faulty batteries that can cause the starting issue. The battery should be the first thing replaced as a simple precaution on the dealers part.

A faulty battery in a modern car can cause all kinds of odd behavior caused by low voltage and electrical stuff behaving oddy as a result.
 

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Once you press the button, wait. It takes a little bit before the car decides to start. If you shift before it's completed starting, your car will be in this limbo. Pressing and holding the start button for about 15 seconds will reset it. Walking away with the FOB for 10 minutes will do the same.
 

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I purchased my Ascent in Jan 2019. New to Subaru I was looking for the something with outstanding safety factor. Of course Subaru comes to mind. I have had Toyota’s the past 3 cars and loved them for their reliability. Since I purchased the Ascent I have had issues with the push start. Sometimes the engine won’t turn over and it sounds like it’s choking. I thought it was the weather however once it started to happen after winter I figured something was wrong. Then a week ago I drove about 2 hours away from my home. When I went to turn my car on it wouldn’t turn over and wouldn’t turn off!! The battery was running but it wouldn’t start or turn off. The key fob was also not responding. Tried to turn it on from my remote app. That reported that the car was already running. SOA and roadside were not helpful. The dealer called and said they couldn’t get it to replicate what happened so they can’t figure it out. I opened a claim with SOA because the delays customer service was poor; they claim to have run all these tests and they are all fine but the last few days they said they found issues with the alternator. What to believe??? ?? has anyone experienced this with their Ascent? I don’t want it back because i don’t think it’s safe. And if I get stuck somewhere with my daughter hours away from home I’m going to livid.
As Robert mentioned the Ascent takes a bit longer to start so if you push the button and immediately shift to Drive or Reverse the car tries to kill the start procedure leaving you in limbo.

Subaru has had issues with the their factory supplied batteries. I had mine replaced because of long cranks and a dead battery cell.

A bad alternator could cause a poorly charged battery which would cause long crank times.

Not defending the poor Subaru battery source, but it's not like this doesn't happen. I've been stranded by batteries on a few cars. I've had a bad battery in a new BMW. It happens. The best Battery I ever had was in a Ram. 7 years and it was still going strong, but it was Heavy Duty.
 

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Sounds to me like a weak battery. When my battery hit bottom @ 2k miles, it sounded and acted weird in terms of lights and clicking and was kind of non-responsive. Low battery voltage can result in all kinds of electronic mayhem, with whatever gets enough voltage to be "on" drawing battery low enough that other electronics don't work right.

I think it's possible that a marginal battery that doesn't hold a charge could result in problems with the alternator if its forced to run at maximum output all the time, but it could be that your battery problems are in fact due to problems with the alternator.

I don't ever think to ask about the battery when buying a new car, other than not expecting it to last all that long because I know its likely a low-end starting battery with weak endurance. But for sure on my next car I'm going to insist on an upgrade to a high-end AGM battery up front.

I got lucky in a sense when my battery went south prematurely over a weekend. I just replaced it myself, since the options were a jump-start or a tow from roadside assist, neither of which was a reasonable solution, and Subaru of America reimbursed me 100% for a better battery. I think SoA knows their low-end batteries are a problem and that they expect to replace a decent percentage of them. Reimbursing an owner when they self replace it early saves them a bunch of money in warranty service and gets them out from under most potential future battery related problems since its no longer their battery.
 

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I think it's possible that a marginal battery that doesn't hold a charge could result in problems with the alternator if its forced to run at maximum output all the time, but it could be that your battery problems are in fact due to problems with the alternator.

...Subaru of America reimbursed me 100% for a better battery...
If the alternator is running at higher output because of a bad battery you may also see reduced gas mileage. That's depending on whether you've racked up enough miles on the Ascent to have something to compare.

How guaranteed is it that SoA will reimburse for a battery? IF mine starts to go bad I'd rather pick a better one myself, but it seems like gambling with getting reimbursed unless its commonplace?
 

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How guaranteed is it that SoA will reimburse for a battery? IF mine starts to go bad I'd rather pick a better one myself, but it seems like gambling with getting reimbursed unless its commonplace?
Honestly, "not guaranteed at all". I think it's a function of mileage and when and where the battery goes bad.

If you have very low miles -- whatever THAT means, but let's call it under 5000 -- and your battery fails at a time and/or place where you can't reasonably get a dealership to test it (far from home, weekend/holiday), and the amount is in the ballpark for a decent battery, I think you could reasonably expect they cover it.

My assumption is that there's also some rational cost/benefit analysis associated with this. If you buy a battery and install it yourself, the cost is sub-$250. It has to cost Subaru at least that to send a truck out to jump you, a tow to a dealership some multiple of that based on distance. If it goes to the dealer, the dealer will probably ding Subaru some kind of warranty service fee to screw around for 1-2 hours of staff time diagnosing it. And if the battery is actually dead, then there's the item cost to provide you a replacement battery.

So Subaru is actually saving money just reimbursing you for a battery vs. all the alternatives, and it's good customer relations to do it versus giving you the runaround.

But change some of those variables -- time of the week, mileage on the vehicle or duration of ownership, you paid a Mercedes dealership to replace it and the tab ran to $800....and I see them less willing to replace it.

In my case, it was Easter weekend, I had just under 2k miles, and the battery was like $198 without the core charge and I replaced it myself. There's just no scenario where Subaru comes out ahead not reimbursing me.
 
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