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Did you use their subframe spacers, or just their top hat spacers?
 

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The Rallitek Rear Overload springs add .4" or less to overall height but allow for less sag when towing. Definitely stiffer than stocks.
The ADF kit raises front 1.5" and rear 1.0".
min new to spring: my use case is id like less sag when towing my travel trailer. Was thinking about different springs or bags. I don’t need “lift” per say. Would the Rallitek work for my needs or are there products that would be better?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Rallitek rear overload spring was developed to eliminate sag from towing. That’s pretty much the only solution for our vehicle.
 

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Rallitek rear overload spring was developed to eliminate sag from towing. That’s pretty much the only solution for our vehicle.
I really don't need the lift but probably 75% or more of the miles are spent towing our camper (with an EV for the daily driver). Anyways did you install the springs yourself and if so how tough of a project for a driveway mechanic?
 

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how tough of a project for a driveway mechanic?
It's not tough if you have right tools. An extra set of hands will come in handy. When I replaced my springs, it took several rounds with the spring compressors I had to get the springs on and off due to interference with the strut unit. It also may take a few times to correctly orient the top mounts. Which means, compress the springs again, etc. If you have more reservations about the work, just give yourself an extra day to complete the job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I really don't need the lift but probably 75% or more of the miles are spent towing our camper (with an EV for the daily driver). Anyways did you install the springs yourself and if so how tough of a project for a driveway mechanic?
Spring compressor is the key. If you have one, or want to rent one, and have experience with this, then it is no big deal. I took it to a buddies shop, and threw it on a lift, which made it quick and easy. Its not hard, and can easily be done without a lift (I did it on my Crosstrek), but this time around, I didn't want to spend 6 hours to do it on my own. Front and rear took 2 hours, start to finish with a lift.
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The Rallitek Rear Overload springs add .4" or less to overall height but allow for less sag when towing. Definitely stiffer than stocks.
The ADF kit raises front 1.5" and rear 1.0". Less rake, not too bad:
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Care to guess how much more weight you can car without excessive sag? I’m curious from the perspective that the max cargo capacity is around 300 pounds less than the GVWR minus the vehicle unloaded weight. Can the overload springs allow us to make use of that 300 pounds?
 

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Care to guess how much more weight you can car without excessive sag? I’m curious from the perspective that the max cargo capacity is around 300 pounds less than the GVWR minus the vehicle unloaded weight. Can the overload springs allow us to make use of that 300 pounds?
No. No springs, lift kits, hitches, or other non-factory modifications, change those numbers, without the specific vehicle going through a certification process (required in all 50 states and DC by federal regulations).

I had an old county bus that was built off an E350 Supervan Double Extended (up for standing and back for more carrying capacity), and it had both the original manufacturer labels, and a full recertification label explaining all the new weight limits and the certification information that changed my "cargo van" into a "commercial passenger bus" with higher weight limits, including information on the certifiying company and their license to do so.

What's on those stickers never changes, without going through such a process. To date, I don't know of any Ascent that's done that.
 

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No. No springs, lift kits, hitches, or other non-factory modifications, change those numbers, without the specific vehicle going through a certification process (required in all 50 states and DC by federal regulations).

I had an old county bus that was built off an E350 Supervan Double Extended (up for standing and back for more carrying capacity), and it had both the original manufacturer labels, and a full recertification label explaining all the new weight limits and the certification information that changed my "cargo van" into a "commercial passenger bus" with higher weight limits, including information on the certifiying company and their license to do so.

What's on those stickers never changes, without going through such a process. To date, I don't know of any Ascent that's done that.
Thanks for the input. I understand that if I exceed the 1158 lb cargo capacity limit that it is at my own risk. (Both from a warranty and a safety aspect.) And that the 1158 lb limit does not change unless the modification are certified. From this I gather that unless there is excessive sag when the vehicle is loaded to 1158 lbs, the overload springs add no value. Does the Ascent have excessive sag when loaded to 1158 lbs?
 

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No, it sags within expected parameters. If it sags more than that, I'd have it checked out, or check out your cargo/tongue weight.

This is a 2011 Heartland Edge M18, and it's at near its 4,395 pound gross weight. My Ascent is also loaded with all its gear (cameras, off-roading kit, recovery kit, etc). Normal sag, no lift/helper springs.


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But, when it comes to exceeding the manufacturer weights, it's more than just "at your own risk". If something happens (eg: serious accident) you may face civil and/or criminal suits/charges.
 

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The yellow payload sticker is very controversial on the truck forums I visit. You can buy a F350 which is normally a 14k lb GVWR truck, derated to 10,000 lbs GVWR for registration purposes because in some areas like California, if your GVWR is over 11,400 lbs, your registration fees take a big jump. If you select the 10k lb derate option, your truck doesn't magically lose 4k lbs of carrying capacity. All that changes is the yellow sticker.

Folks that have been pulled over by highway patrol and had their weights check report that what is done is they get the load on the rear axle weighed and then the LEO compares the load rating on the tires and axle with that of the actual rear load. If you're over then you get a big fine.

Now with the Ascent, it's a unibody, so I'd be much more careful with how much you carry. I have no idea if you can safely exceed the yellow payload sticker. If someone knows the load capacity of the rear axle, that would be helpful. You should always go to a CAT scale anyway and measure the actual load on the rear axle. In Subaru's case they spec no more than 500 lbs on the hitch, so that's going to be your limiting factor.

Suspension modifications can be done to improve the handling with a load. But they will not materially change the legal payload of your vehicle.
 
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