Subaru Ascent Forum banner
1 - 20 of 69 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,117 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Everyone who's new to Eyesight, PLEASE read your Eyesight manuals (or at least please read my summary below). They're in your glove box (unless you removed them). There are two (full manual and quick guide).
  • Please note that my tips are not substitutes for reading the manual, but should be used as a supplement to reading the manual.

I'm going to be direct for the sake of clarity, because this is VERY important stuff to keep in mind so that you do not get into a dangerous situation by misusing Eyesight and its related features such as Lane Keep Assist (LKA) or Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC).

Some important notes:
  • You MUST always keep your hand(s) on the wheel. Lane Keep Assist is designed to assist you in your active steering attempts. If you're pinballing back and forth between the lines, then, put your hands back on the wheel (and keep at least one there). It is designed to work with your steering input (and when you let it do that, it's an amazing thing). It is not designed to steer by itself for you.
    .
  • Lane Keep Assist is NOT a lane centering system. So, if you head towards the edge of a lane, it will pull you back in and stop correcting. As you head towards the other side, it will do the same thing, causing you to pinball.
    .
  • Because LKA is not a lane centering system, once you get used to driving with it, you will find you can literally drive at either edge of a lane and it will help keep you there, or drive down the center, or anywhere else IN the lane that you want to. That's one of the advantages of LKA over systems that try to center you. You've got more flexibility once you learn what the system does and how to interact with it.
    .
  • You are supposed to turn off Lane Keep Assist (LKA) and Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) in construction areas. Seriously, turn them off. Doesn't matter if the construction zone is active. If there's new lane markings crossing old ones, cones, temporary jersey walls or whatever, turn off the systems. The computer cannot make the judgment calls a human brain can. Yet.
    .
  • Do not use Adaptive Cruise Control to enter or exit a highway, or on traffic controlled streets (eg: Do NOT use it on any roads that have stop signs, and/or traffic lights). ONLY use it on highways and roadways that don't have lights and/or stop signs.
    .
  • ACC will NOT "follow" a stopped car at a light. Don't try it. It follows moving cars to a stop and restart, but doesn't avoid fully stopped/parked cars until the collision avoidance system kicks in (which may be too late). That's not a flaw in the system - it's intended to follow traffic, not to avoid stopped/parked cars.
    .
  • You should be acutely aware of people cutting you off at slower speeds when ACC is active. ACC may not have time to react - YOU need to react or be prepared to do so.
    .
  • If you are using ACC, make sure it actually sees the vehicle in front of you. The green heads up light will show on your windshield, and the Eyesight display on the center top screen will show the green "seeing" lines and the vehicle and a simulation of the distance.
    .
  • Do not use Eyesight ACC to follow irregular shaped vehicles, bicycles, people or similar objects.
    .
  • Do not use ACC in snow or other inclement weather that obscures lane markings.
    .
  • Do NOT put anything in the Eyesight windshield or dashboard zone (see the manual).
    .
  • Do NOT use Rain-X on the windshield. It creates glare that messes with the system.
    .
  • Do not get your windshield coated (eg: If you do Ceramic Pro like I did on my Ascent, make sure they do not do the inside or outside of the windshield).
    .
  • LKA turns OFF below 35-40mph, even if it was just active and doing things. Be aware of that if you're relying on it around bends/turns and slow down.
    .
  • LKA turns on and off when it thinks you need help. If it's on, always be prepared for it to stop assisting when it thinks it's set you on the correct path - because it will. That's what it's designed to do. Aim you in the right direction, or help you around a difficult part of a turn, and then leave you alone.
.
There are a number of other scenarios where Eyesight needs driver assistance or should be turned off.

Here's the online version of the manual - PLEASE read it:
https://techinfo.subaru.com/stis/doc/ownerManual/MSA5M1926A_STIS.pdf

Here's the Eyesight Quick Guide, which I suggest you read with the full manual in the first link:
https://techinfo.subaru.com/stis/doc/ownerManual/MSA5B1913A_STIS.pdf
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,117 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Loving it more and more

Well, after putting on over 4,200 miles on my Ascent so far, I am loving Eyesight more and more. It took a little getting used to, and learning how to properly use it (see my notes above), but I thoroughly love it!!!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,117 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've re-opened this thread for questions about Lane Keep Assist and Lane Departure Warnings and Eyesight in general. Please let's keep the conversation to those topics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
Not EyeSight, exactly, but close... I have a RAB observation that doesn't seem to be common...

When I backed up a U-Haul trailer, the RAB alarmed at me (a lot) then disabled itself shortly thereafter (showing "RAB Off" on the head unit). I thought this was really helpful operation, but most people in these scenarios have reported the RAB hit the brakes and did not allow them to proceed until they put the car in Park and turned RAB off. Any thoughts on the behavior I saw?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,117 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It's all about the distance. If whatever is on the back is far enough away, it won't stop the car because it never gets close enough. Mount it a tiny bit closer and the car will jam on the brakes and refuse to move.

Not EyeSight, exactly, but close... I have a RAB observation that doesn't seem to be common...

When I backed up a U-Haul trailer, the RAB alarmed at me (a lot) then disabled itself shortly thereafter (showing "RAB Off" on the head unit). I thought this was really helpful operation, but most people in these scenarios have reported the RAB hit the brakes and did not allow them to proceed until they put the car in Park and turned RAB off. Any thoughts on the behavior I saw?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts
Hey Rob...I'm not sure if you remembered but you promised to shoot a video on Eyesight pre-collision braking system. Please share a video if you already done so.
Anyways, here is my problem...Eyesight is not detecting an object EVERY TIME when I get close to the car in front of me.
Sure, it detected 2 times (almost in a 1 week of ownership) and it absolutely tells you that the car ahead is moved. I get that, but I more care about stopping my vehicle.

I previously created a post where I raised a concern why Eyesight didn't warn me anything at the stop sign when I get close to the car. In response you and some other mentioned that it will detect for sure and someone said their Ascent is also not detecting properly as their other Subaru's doing.
I also watched tons of Eyesight videos where everyone tested with giving gas and not applying any brakes, none tested with applying brakes.
So, I tested with both scenarios...gas and brakes. Only detected 2 times and within the span of 30 seconds or so. After that it never detected any object/car. I followed very close to the car like may be 5 - 10 feet. Tested in day and night.

I didn't have any problem with BSM, LKA at all and I loved it. So far it worked every time except in rain when the lane markings are not visible properly, no issue with that.
I really want the Eyesight to work every time, except worst weather conditions.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,117 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi pashi266, so, here's an interesting thing I've noted from testing. If you're approaching a stopped car, you will not get the same type of notifications you see when your Ascent is following someone with Adaptive Cruise Control enabled, even if ACC is enabled.

So, the follow feature is separate from the pre-collision braking feature. Pre-collision braking waits until almost the absolute last second (with some small safety buffer) before it alerts and then brakes. If you weren't at risk of crashing into the car, then you should expect to see the car do nothing. I need to coordinate with my best friend to do the video I want, because there are of course very few people who'd let me run at their car with mine and let the Ascent do something, but, some of the scenarios require a second object that's moving, and cardboard boxes don't cut it.

Also, if you are using ACC and a car is *stopped* some place in the lane in front of you, it may or may not notice it. If it doesn't, then you won't see the car come up on the ACC display, but will, as you get closer, eventually see the pre-collision system take over.

And finally, even when using ACC, if a car in front of you rapidly slows down, and ACC doesn't react quick enough (eg; doesn't jam hard enough on the brakes), then pre-collision braking will kick on even while ACC is trying to slow you down, at which point, you will first simultaneously get a collision alert while ACC is still normal-braking, and then (if you don't do anything) pre-collision braking will take over and slam on the brakes.

What I did find, thanks to some crazy New York drivers helping me test (truth be told, it was actually just their crappy driving, and likely not their intentions to help), you need to be pretty close for PCB to work.

Keep in mind, the Ascent somehow manages to stop from 60mph in 119 or 118 feet (depending on trim, with the Touring stopping in the shortest distance). That's massively impressive for something so heavy. Point being, the car needs an uncomfortably small distance to pre-collision stop. I too wasn't sure if mine was working until some guy cut me off literally under a foot in front of me at highway speeds. At that distance and speeds, btw, the car will warn you and jam on the brakes at the same time.

Anyway, easy way to test is to get a couple big moving boxes, an old fridge box, or grab all the boxes from you or a neighbor's Amazon Prime orders (what, everyone doesn't have my Amazon Prime addiction?)... stack them up in an empty lot, and accelerate towards them at 5mph, then 10/15mph, 20mph, and finally 25mph or so. At over 30ish/35ish, the system will mitigate the impact force, but not likely stop you in time. But, at 25mph, it should stop you fine.

People build something car height and try...


OF COURSE, if you or anyone wants to try that, keep in mind that even empty cardboard boxes may damage the finish on your car, or the grille or such. Ideally, I'd use big foam squares or something...
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,117 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Bruceyyyy did a video...

@Brucey actually did a nice test video (along with his more fun videos) showing Eyesight being tested and what people can expect. It's literally last second.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts
you need to be pretty close for PCB to work.
Thanks for the detailed explanation, but don't you think it would be nice if the system warns you few seconds before it jams the brakes, instead of wait until the collision is imminent? It should give at least few seconds to the driver to react and apply the brakes, and if they don't take over it.
Even in this case, it would be nice if the system has some settings that can be changed by the driver. for example, the distance between the front car and when it should give audible warning. I wonder all other safety systems (radar) in other cars works the same way? Ascent is the only vehicle I drove with safety technology.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,117 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the detailed explanation, but don't you think it would be nice if the system warns you few seconds before it jams the brakes, instead of wait until the collision is imminent? It should give at least few seconds to the driver to react and apply the brakes, and if they don't take over it.
Even in this case, it would be nice if the system has some settings that can be changed by the driver. for example, the distance between the front car and when it should give audible warning. I wonder all other safety systems (radar) in other cars works the same way? Ascent is the only vehicle I drove with safety technology.
Except in the events of there not being a few seconds, you will get a few second warning. If someone cuts you off up close, the car warns and acts all at once. If you're dozing at the wheel or don't see the car stopped at the light, it will warn, give you a couple seconds, and then jam on the brakes.

Speculation: The amount of warning isn't likely configurable because it's determined by the scenarios in question. In my experience, it's already variable, so, that's why I speculate it's not configurable - because it already adjusts depending on circumstance.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,117 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Lane Keep Assist is not Lane Centering Assist...

Just a reminder to all:
I know there's some neat commercials coming out from a couple of other vehicle manufacturers who are irresponsibly showing drivers taking both of their hands off the wheel, but currently, there are ZERO consumer vehicles in this country that are rated for autonomous driving, and drivers are directed by the manufacturers to keep a hand on the wheel at all times the vehicle is in motion.

So, please, remember to keep hands on the wheel when the vehicle is in motion. If you are pinballing back and forth across a lane, there's a good chance it's because your hands are not on the wheel.

While there is no specific law mandating a number of hands required to be on the steering wheel, virtually every state has some language that requires that the driver "maintain(s) constant control of the vehicle", which is not possible with no hands on the wheel and today's current assistive driving technology that is not designed for fully autonomous driving.


Another important note:
The Subaru Eyesight Lane Keep Assist system is designed to help you stay in a lane - it is not a lane centering system. That hopefully explains why your car is pinballing back and forth when you take your hands off the wheel.

That'll hopefully also explain how Eyesight's Lane Keep Assist system works, and the differences between it and lane centering systems.

Everyone who's used both has their preferences. Personally, I prefer the less limiting Lane Keep Assist in the Subarus, because I can choose to ride on the very edge of a lane marker and it will help me stay there, instead of yanking me back into the lane. And, when it does yank me back into a lane, I know it's not because I was close to the lane marker, but instead, I was accidentally hanging over it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
561 Posts
ACC is awesome until a the car in front exits the highway with their brakes lights on. My car will slow down considerably and most of the time I end of hitting the gas if someone is behind me to avoid a rear end collision.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,117 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,406 Posts
I want to know if the EyeSight will prevent colliding into an object that's not a car or something very slender like a light pole. I imagine not because the performance reliability is based on a straight-line roadway surface and not jumping the curb, onto the grass, hitting the poles.

Perhaps that one lane departure feature fills the gap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
932 Posts
Does ACC have different characteristics for Eco/Comfort/Standard if there is no lead car acquired? For example if my cruise is set to 45 and there is no one in front of me, will it have the same eco comfort standard characteristics?

Thanks.
 
1 - 20 of 69 Posts
Top