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Iceman, I’ve been running the Cobb 93 map for 6 months now. MPG has been my biggest point of contention with the vehicle. So much so that I’d have sold the vehicle shortly after buying it if I wouldn’t take such a financial hit on all the vehicle mods we performed. With that being said, I avg about 11 mpg in the city without the Accesport installed, and while running the 93 map I avg 9.6 mpg. The accesport has been uninstalled over a half dozen times and I’ve never had any issues.

if you ever run in to any issues that you claim under SOA warranty and your service department runs diagnostics the vehicle recorder will show that you’ve altered the vehicle map despite having your Cobb accesport installed at the time of your vehicle being serviced.

Just curious, while having your Ascent tuned with the COBB 93 map did your MPG spike a bit or did it remain the same or get a little worse (while driving normal that is, not towing or off road stuff).

I am really tempted to go with the Accessport V3 (AP3-SUB-005) but I am still a little bit concerned about the factory warranty and my extended warranty. I wonder, has anyone had a COBB map installed and then uninstall the COBB map and return the vehicle back to the Subaru stock map and then go through an engine warranty repair of some sort and not have any issues with SOA or the dealer for that matter?
 

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I wonder if the COBB voids the warranty.
 

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I wonder if the COBB voids the warranty.
In the US...almost nothing "voids the warranty" globally. A third party modification/part, if it causes an issue and it can be proven ti caused the issue would allow the manufacturer to deny a claim for that specific thing, but it wouldn't permit them to deny a claim for something completely unrelated. That's the law.
 

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We have been running the Cobb 87+ Tune for the last ~4,800 miles of mixed driving. Current overall average is 23.1 mpg. We do a lot of 35-55 driving, some stop and go, and then some highway 75-85 mph in mixed traffic.
 

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I'm hoping that more tuners and enthusiasts who self-tune will eventually come to populate our ranks. It'll be interesting to see what folks are able to cook-up. :)

There's already a good off-roading/overlanding and RV/towing contingent here -as we would expect of this type of vehicle- but I'm hoping that those who want to head the other way in terms of ride-height and sidewall aspect-ratio will also come here in-earnest, soon!
They have cooked up anything from stock numbers to 500whp with similar torque increases. But, no one will exceed Cobb numbers without risking the CVT, because no one has figured out how to control it for higher clamping pressure to allow more torque.

Some of the results are in this forum. I even helped nudge one of the tuners to find the variable wastegate controls (he kept finding a simple on/off). One such result in in a Crosstrek.
 

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I wonder if the COBB voids the warranty.
If you brought the car to the dealer for an engine-related issue (or even CVT-related issue) and your car has a tune, you'd be making it very easy for Subaru to blame the aftermarket tune/parts as the cause of the failure. If you had a tie rod issue or something that was clearly not related to the power-adders, Subaru wouldn't even be looking at computer data. But a tune would certainly add "reasonable culpability" to a whole host of driveline-related questions. Something with the engine? "The tune probably caused it." Something with the CVT or CV joints or rear differential? "The extra power from the tune may have caused it."

I'm not saying Subaru would, without question, blame anything they reasonably could on your tune, but it's possible. This is the risk taken when vehicles under warranty are modified.

Some people wait until after their cars are out of warranty to modify them. There's good justification for that.
 

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They have cooked up anything from stock numbers to 500whp with similar torque increases. But, no one will exceed Cobb numbers without risking the CVT, because no one has figured out how to control it for higher clamping pressure to allow more torque.

Some of the results are in this forum. I even helped nudge one of the tuners to find the variable wastegate controls (he kept finding a simple on/off). One such result in in a Crosstrek.
Oh, I know! I've read! :)

But I want more. :D
 

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If you brought the car to the dealer for an engine-related issue (or even CVT-related issue) and your car has a tune, you'd be making it very easy for Subaru to blame the aftermarket tune/parts as the cause of the failure. If you had a tie rod issue or something that was clearly not related to the power-adders, Subaru wouldn't even be looking at computer data. But a tune would certainly add "reasonable culpability" to a whole host of driveline-related questions. Something with the engine? "The tune probably caused it." Something with the CVT or CV joints or rear differential? "The extra power from the tune may have caused it."

I'm not saying Subaru would, without question, blame anything they reasonably could on your tune, but it's possible. This is the risk taken when vehicles under warranty are modified.

Some people wait until after their cars are out of warranty to modify them. There's good justification for that.
Don't forget that the reflash procedure itself can potentially "brick" the ECU, no matter how rare such an occurrence happens to be. And that of-course also ties into all the other electrical systems.........

And as you very well noted, it's always the "probably may have caused":rolleyes: that's up for debate - and much like arguing a speeding ticket on the side of the road, it's oftentimes not only unproductive, but outright counter-productive. And once it's been noted by your dealership that they're denying warranty service because of modifications, things just get harder from there.

When I took my Tribeca in for a front passenger seat airbag sensor replacement, the technician who looked at the vehicle frowned at the ICE modifications I had performed - hardwired radar-detector, laser jammer, GPS, HK Drive/Play, and suggested that it "might have contributed to" the demise of the front passenger airbag sensor. The service manager had just come over to the vehicle at the time, and virtually slapped the tech on the back of the head, snapping: "Don't be ridiculous, that has nothing to do with it! Mr. Lee, this is of-course going to be covered under your vehicle warranty."

In the real world, the biggest roadblock for those who are looking to modify their vehicles while still retaining warranty protection is finding that "mod-friendly" dealership - they'll cut that "voiding the warranty" crap right from the git. For those unlucky to be limited to "mod-unfriendly" dealerships, it's an uphill fight from the start.
 

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In the real world, the biggest roadblock for those who are looking to modify their vehicles while still retaining warranty protection is finding that "mod-friendly" dealership - they'll cut that "voiding the warranty" crap right from the git. For those unlucky to be limited to "mod-unfriendly" dealerships, it's an uphill fight from the start.
It's an interesting thing. Subaru seems to simply want the dealerships to be legitimate in their determination. Dealerships seem to sit all over the place in how they handle things. Subaru has to rely on them to tell SoA what's wrong, and how it happened.

It's interesting, because I've seen similar with Tesla owners, and there, Tesla has full control directly, instead of relying on franchisees.
 

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^ "Interesting" is what I think, too.

I've been in the Import Sport Compact "tuning" hobby since the early-mid-90s, first in the DSM scene. Even back then (and I know that's not too long ago, for those here who may have stepped into the fray in the 80s or even earlier, but alas, I am only a man-boy in his mid-40s :p), whether we would get help at all when we pulled into the bays of dealership service departments seemed to be extremely variable.

Things haven't changed for at least the 30-something years that I've been legally behind the wheel, and to be frank, I don't know if they'll ever change, even as my daughter is looking to sit down behind the wheel herself, and has some thoughts towards working on whatever she will come to get in the next few months.
 

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The warranty voiding discussion is always an interesting one to me. I don't have any first hand experience/issues with it, but I wonder what incentive a dealer would have to try to deny work under warranty - especially as franchises and not factory owned entities. To me it plays out two ways:

1) dealer fixes vehicle under warranty and is reimbursed through the manufacturer for parts and labor (yes, I know if non-warranty the dealer could charge the customer higher prices for both), but customer is happy and likely returns
2) dealer denies to fix something under warranty, customer is upset (right or wrong) and likely never spends money at that dealer again (sales or service)

I'm sure I'm over simplifying it, but if I were running a service department, I know which way I'd lean.
 

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1) dealer fixes vehicle under warranty and is reimbursed through the manufacturer for parts and labor (yes, I know if non-warranty the dealer could charge the customer higher prices for both), but customer is happy and likely returns
Having no knowledge of the nitty-gritty behind the scenes, I personally believe it should be this simple (but probably is not). I imagine every manufacturer has language in their contracts or training materials with dealerships about protecting the integrity of the brand or protecting the manufacturer from financial liability for issues that are caused by customers or their modifications. It seems like it's even setup as a battlefield sometimes (at least from the customer's perspective), where it's "the manufacturer versus the customer", and the dealer is hyped up to be the guy on the front line identifying and marking the bad customers, almost like a bouncer.

Aside from that, I do know that some manufacturers have a pretty rigorous warranty claim process, and I think the onus is on the dealerships sometimes to be able to prove component failure in order to get warranty reimbursement. In other words, if it's not obvious the returned part failed due to an engineering or manufacturing problem, then the dealer's warranty claim is denied. So there may be cases where a dealer is trying to protect its own bottom line. I once had a Chrysler minivan with a problem with one of the power seat tracks. I don't recall specifically what it was, but it was something where it wasn't acting quite right, but it was still sort of functional. The dealer advised me not to push it because they felt that it wouldn't have been a strong enough parts failure for Chrysler to reimburse them for the part and labor, and then they'd have to retroactively collect that from me. I think it's a terrible business practice and my experience largely falls into your scenario #2.

I'm sure novel-length books could be written on the world of warranty work and on theory of what the right balance is between protecting oneself financially vs. taking care of the customer in the hopes of repeat business. Where one manufacturer approaches this differently from another, I'm sure there's a lot of business data that went into that decision.
 

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I'm sure that some dealers will choose to "fix under warranty" sometimes when an issue might otherwise be denied because of some situation/modification. But that doesn't change their "contractual responsibility to the manufacturer" to be the eyes and ears relative to eligibility as Robert mentioned. I would guess that a dealer that is caught "routinely" submitting for warranty work that shouldn't have been warranty work would face some level of angst from the manufacturer.
 
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