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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I happened tto find this "Super OBD2" performance chip 5.0 for the Subaru Ascent on Ebay. Note: I have no connection with this company what-so-ever. The manufacture makes some pretty strong performance claims for this product. Anybody know anything about it?

Thanks for any advice, tips etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your reply. I see that COBB has the Subaru Ascent Accessport V3 (AP3-SUB-005) available for 675.00

Does anyone have this product installed on their Ascent? How well does it perform? Besides performance gains are there any noticeable cruising gas mileage gains?
 

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2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
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Does anyone have this product installed on their Ascent? How well does it perform? Besides performance gains are there any noticeable cruising gas mileage gains?
There's a whole Tuning discussion area here in the technical section that deals with tuning and it's mostly Cobb. Cobb also participates in the discussion. So yes, there are many happy users of the product.
 

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I happened tto find this "Super OBD2" performance chip 5.0 for the Subaru Ascent on Ebay. Note: I have no connection with this company what-so-ever. The manufacture makes some pretty strong performance claims for this product. Anybody know anything about it?

Thanks for any advice, tips etc.
They claim the product "learns" your driving habits then optimizes ignition advance, even transmission shifting. But then they show a PIC16F59 as the brains of this AI marvel. It has a total of 134 bytes of RAM (not kilobytes, not megabytes, not Gigabytes, just bytes), that's where it will memorize your driving style, except is not enough to store one old Tweet (back when it was limited to 140 characters).
It also has 3kbytes of flash, to store the incredible algorithm that will do all this to your car. That's not enough to carry any complete remapping tables. So there's one simple conclusion: IT CANNOT DO WHAT IT SAYS, it's a scam.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
By the way, I do have the COBB Accessport, using a 93 map and it DOES exactly what it says.
Just curious, while having your Ascent tuned with the COBB 93 map did your MPG spike a bit or did it remain the same or get a little worse (while driving normal that is, not towing or off road stuff).

I am really tempted to go with the Accessport V3 (AP3-SUB-005) but I am still a little bit concerned about the factory warranty and my extended warranty. I wonder, has anyone had a COBB map installed and then uninstall the COBB map and return the vehicle back to the Subaru stock map and then go through an engine warranty repair of some sort and not have any issues with SOA or the dealer for that matter?
 

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Just curious, while having your Ascent tuned with the COBB 93 map did your MPG spike a bit or did it remain the same or get a little worse (while driving normal that is, not towing or off road stuff).

I am really tempted to go with the Accessport V3 (AP3-SUB-005) but I am still a little bit concerned about the factory warranty and my extended warranty. I wonder, has anyone had a COBB map installed and then uninstall the COBB map and return the vehicle back to the Subaru stock map and then go through an engine warranty repair of some sort and not have any issues with SOA or the dealer for that matter?
Hello, I took my car in for a software update and forgot to Unload COBB. Of course it failed. I blamed an unknown company. Went home went back to OEM tune and Subaru updated it no problem, no questions. Just change back to OEM if you go in for service problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hello, I took my car in for a software update and forgot to Unload COBB. Of course it failed. I blamed an unknown company. Went home went back to OEM tune and Subaru updated it no problem, no questions. Just change back to OEM if you go in for service problems.
Okay, will do! Thank you for your info and advice.
 

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So the data system does not save the various actions? ie if one “tunes” and while tuned, there is a tune related or unrelated failure, the techs won’t be able to discover you modified the car?
 

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I've read that Subaru, if they want or need to verify your ECU, will know if the data were overwritten and then restored again. This thread on a different board suggests that the dealer's scan tool cannot see it but they could find it if they looked a little further into the ECU's data, forensically. And then even that thread is 10 years old. Perhaps things are different today, in either direction (better detection by Subaru or better covering of tracks by aftermarket tuners).

I suspect they would be more likely to investigate something like this if they suspect your car had been modified. If you have a lot of aftermarket parts, aftermarket exhaust, etc...they'd rightly think that you'd be more likely to have modified the ECU software. If you have no other mods and the car looks like a soccer mom's SUV, they'd probably not suspect anything was done to the ECU. That is, of course, pure speculation on my part.
 

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I too have the Cobb Accessport and run the 87+ tune. Love it. Gives the Ascent smooth butter power (as I say). Modestly increases the power curve at most RPMS, but does many other just as important things. For example, smooths out the factory tune's low RPM power bump, adjusts (as possible) some aspects of the CVT (tranny much more driveable with the tune), adjusts throttle response, etc. I will say that I have been using Cobb Accessport's for about a decade. I still have a Mazdaspeed 3 that I custom tune using Cobb's Accestuner Race software (paid for training years ago). They are the real deal. Safe, better, more driveable power and response. Also, on average I find that a modest aftermarket tune actually nets more power but also equivalent or better fuel economy. My personal explanation is that OEMs build in very significant safety margins in fuel trims (i.e., erring on side of always very slightly over fueling in most conditions) whereas Cobb fine tunes the mass air flow sensor calibration and some other ECM targets to tighten up fueling (but still absolutely safe, avoiding that lean 'go boom' risk). Anyways, the accessport is a great tool.
 

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Or, great marketing by tuners? 😀

I think being able to control boost vs longevity would be useful, but OEMs can’t be dumb enough not to be able to manage their products, right?
 

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Just curious, while having your Ascent tuned with the COBB 93 map did your MPG spike a bit or did it remain the same or get a little worse (while driving normal that is, not towing or off road stuff).

I am really tempted to go with the Accessport V3 (AP3-SUB-005) but I am still a little bit concerned about the factory warranty and my extended warranty. I wonder, has anyone had a COBB map installed and then uninstall the COBB map and return the vehicle back to the Subaru stock map and then go through an engine warranty repair of some sort and not have any issues with SOA or the dealer for that matter?
No difference in mpg. Big difference in reaction time and torque. More noticeable if you do manual shifting, as the CVT hides the effect a little because it's smoother.

As far as the dealer: all you need to do is make sure you don't take the car to the dealer with the custom firmware. Always flash back to stock before, flash back to 93 performance map afterwards. It only adds 10 minutes to your service time.
As COBB expressed somewhere in another thread: there's no flashing counter on the ECU so the only "tell" would be that your ECU will have a short history of data, since it was reset when you flashed it. But that is not sufficient for them to guess anything.
I had an interesting experience with my battery dying under warranty. I had to get creative in order to flash the ECU with a damaged battery (could've replaced it myself, of course) before taking it to the dealer.
 

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So the data system does not save the various actions? ie if one “tunes” and while tuned, there is a tune related or unrelated failure, the techs won’t be able to discover you modified the car?
All the car learning is reset when you install or uninstall a firmware. If you have a problem while tuned, you'd have to remove the tune then try to reproduce the problem. All codes will be lost after a reflash. What I would do is use my own code reader, take a screenshot I can show the dealer and then reflash. You can simply tell the dealer you erased the codes to see if it would happen again or if it was a one-off. This is not a 007 movie, no need to get paranoid.
 

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And, I’m thinking that until we can find someone who has been through a cycle of a failure of some sort with a tuned car that we really won’t know …
 

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And, I’m thinking that until we can find someone who has been through a cycle of a failure of some sort with a tuned car that we really won’t know …
 

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Or, great marketing by tuners? 😀

I think being able to control boost vs longevity would be useful, but OEMs can’t be dumb enough not to be able to manage their products, right?
OEMs certainly are not dumb but they are designing for a huge variety of factors and tune for a version of the vehicle performing in the lower statistical bounds. The same reason the same aftermarket tune will behave a little differently in two different otherwise identical Ascents.

For example, on my Mazdaspeed3 the OEM variation on long term fuel trim is +/- 15% from expected values - that is the OEM tuning actual value range. The vehicle monitors actual fuel remaining in exhaust and learns long term fuel trim values over 10-15 drive cycles and at varying RPMs. With the accessport, I have the mass air flow sensor so well calibrated that the car learns LTFT with +/- 2% accuracy. OEM won't ever get that close because they would have to tune each vehicle on a track or dynamometer to do so. I combine that refinement with another key one, targeted air-fuel ratio, and tolerance for variation. Setting more strict goals for air-fuel ratio, say from OEM's 11.5-12.5 up to 12.7-13.5 also makes a significant difference (14.7 air-fuel is lambda the perfect ratio). Most OEMs run a good portion off that as safety margin, going lean air-fuel is very dangerous for turbo engines, but also because extra fuel is used to cool the cylinder walls. An aftermarket tune allows you to be more aggressive in the algorithms but also to monitor if the net result remains in the tolerance (temperature, knock, timing). It is not for everyone, but is far more than simple marketing hype. I have 100k on my tuned mazda - zero issues. I fully expect, which at this point is faith and hope, that the quality of the "stock" tune from Cobb for the Ascent, especially the 87+ conservative tune will net similar longevity.

The big issue with my example above is that Cobb Tuning does not allow the use of Accesstuner Race to modify Ascent tunes - not yet anyways. I wish I could load the Cobb out-the-box tunes in Accesstuner because I could see the 75 or so tables the tune is modifying. I would like to see how much more accurate the Ascent aftermarket tune is over the OEM tune.

I would also like to see if Subaru is using more purely pressure (aka boost) based tuning or the more intricate engine load tuning method. In other words, is the ECM targeting particular boost pressure given RPM and throttle position OR is it targeting engine load using the turbo as one tool to increase engine output to a threshold (but varying boost pressure quite broadly). I am curious. Mazdaspeeds use load based tuning, but in wide open throttle conditions at certain RPMs when no engine knock is detected will revert to pure boost tuning momentarily - the throwback in the seat moment. It is intricate to see in the tune.

P.S. Don't tow on an aftermarket tune - too many unknowns and towing drastically changes engine load dynamics
 

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Or, great marketing by tuners? 😀

I think being able to control boost vs longevity would be useful, but OEMs can’t be dumb enough not to be able to manage their products, right?
You must have been burned really bad by "marketing" at some point in your life; I've seen you mention "marketing" in a few different threads... haha
 
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