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Costco, starting on Halloween, has Bridgestone (Blizzaks) on sale for $70 off for the month of Nov. If you buy before the 15th, you get 1cent installation. Since it seems to be tough to unload the 20" stock rims, I think I may just throw Blizzaks on them for the Thanksgiving thru Spring Break season. Got 2 weeks to finalize.
I cant seem to find this deal on costco website? Do you have a link? Thanks.
 

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I cant seem to find this deal on costco website? Do you have a link? Thanks.
Well, it is not Halloween now is it?......It was in the November issue of Costco Connection that just showed up a few days ago. p128? in mine.

*edit* And seeing you are in NYC, It is not available in some NY locations.
 

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Well, it is not Halloween now is it?......It was in the November issue of Costco Connection that just showed up a few days ago. p128? in mine.

*edit* And seeing you are in NYC, It is not available in some NY locations.
Thanks, was curious since some of you guys saw it and someone purchased it, I figured it was advertised some where on costco already but I guess it doesnt matter as it may not be offered in nyc anyway.

my local warehouse is listing it for $211/tire for blizzak with the standard $15/tire installation.
 

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Thanks, was curious since some of you guys saw it and someone purchased it, I figured it was advertised some where on costco already but I guess it doesnt matter as it may not be offered in nyc anyway.

my local warehouse is listing it for $211/tire for blizzak with the standard $15/tire installation.
Yes I bought the tires already and got it installed. I am in Ottawa, Canada and here Costco had the offer from September some date to October 7th. I ordered the tires before even getting the car, as I knew as soon as get car I would need it.
 

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@AscentAdmin Hi is there way to remove the wolf pic. It got dropped mistakenly, I don't see an option to remove it.
Done. You can do it as well for as long as you can edit the post by (on a computer) hitting "Edit" then going into the "Advanced" editor, then scrolling down to the attachment list, then select "Manage Attachments", then hitting the "Remove" button next to the one you want to be rid of, then closing out of it and saving the post.

Yeah, it's a process. :plain: :tango_face_wink:
 

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Here are the pictures

Looks good. Thanks for sharing the photos. I have the Blizzak on my MDX and planning on getting them for the Ascent for the winter season. Have had position experiences so far with the Blizzak V2s. I'll have to check out Costco's promo after Halloween. TireRack has them listed for for about $204/each for the P245/50/R20.
 

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How much do you notice the increased road noise? It's pretty significant on my WRX when I switch from summer to winter tires.
To be honest, not noticeable at all. May be I should have driven with windows open before and after and with no music. With windows closed there is no way of telling, as I felt as quiet as the stock tires.

Don't know if it is with the car/ the tires. When I switched my Honda Insight summer to Michelin X Ice long back there was a clear difference, so I know what you're talking about. But years later when I changed winters to Blizzaks( on Insight) there was probably only a slight increase in noise. So I think generally Blizzaks are quieter winter tires.
 

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Done. You can do it as well for as long as you can edit the post by (on a computer) hitting "Edit" then going into the "Advanced" editor, then scrolling down to the attachment list, then select "Manage Attachments", then hitting the "Remove" button next to the one you want to be rid of, then closing out of it and saving the post.

Yeah, it's a process. :plain: :tango_face_wink:
Thanks Robert. One more thing to know for next time :smile:
 

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Had some Nokian WRG2 on a RWD Dodge with a Hemi that i left on year around and they lasted close to 40k before they were toast. I rotated every 8-10 and floored it at every 3rd light:) Great tire and still handled decent and was a beast in the snow. Probably softer tires out there, but they were a good balance for wear and performance. They do wear quick, but if you rotate they are not terrible.
Ah, the WRG2s are a bit "special."

Allow me to geek-out for a moment..... :nerd:

They're among a class of tires that are an intermediary between what are considered as "All Season" tires and the highest clear-roads (be it wet or not, simply clear of frozen precipitation) performers of "winter tires," the "Performance Winters." :tango_face_wink: These tires are referred to as "All Weather" tires, and were an advent of the last decade or so as tire makers started to responds to the wants of a niche market: those folks who wanted more winter capabilities than typical "All Season" tires, but didn't want to be bothered with swapping between two sets of tires every season.

The trick with "All Weather" tires is that the driver will have to - like you did - be smart about tire care/maintenance so that they can make the tread last as long as possible in order to maximize that one aspect of winter capabilities: tread depth.

Either that, or simply buy replacements when their winter-wear-marker approaches. :smile:

"All Weather" tires are also great for geographic areas where *serious* winter precipitation is less likely, and for folks who want longer treadwear (see care/maintenance) than "Performance Winter" tires. Ostensibly, "All Weather" tires was conceived of by Nokian, who designed this type of tire to better suit "Central European" winter conditions - including slush.




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RE: NVH - [N]oise [V]ibration and [H]arshness


Just be aware when you switch to snow tires, there will be a constant hum from the tires on the roadway. It is quite noticeable on our Outback. I guess that is the trade-off for traction.
and

How much do you notice the increased road noise? It's pretty significant on my WRX when I switch from summer to winter tires.
To be honest, not noticeable at all. May be I should have driven with windows open before and after and with no music. With windows closed there is no way of telling, as I felt as quiet as the stock tires.

Don't know if it is with the car/ the tires. When I switched my Honda Insight summer to Michelin X Ice long back there was a clear difference, so I know what you're talking about. But years later when I changed winters to Blizzaks( on Insight) there was probably only a slight increase in noise. So I think generally Blizzaks are quieter winter tires.
NVH with aftermarket tires is typically both vehicle-dependent as well as subjective.

The amount of money that the big tire manufactures spend to bring offerings to-market is literally crazy. Part of that also goes to OE fitments. And part of that, is aimed at curtailing any interior unpleasantness for the vehicle's passengers. While this may be less important for certain specific genres of vehicles - i.e. for a supercar or hypercar, the focus may be more about how the tire mates with the car's chassis and expert driver inputs in order to produce certain performance characteristics that the particular car make is known for - you can bet that it is money well-spent for passenger vehicles.

Objectively, engineering considerations such as sound-deadening - and other stuff that is well beyond the depth and breadth of my limited knowledge puddle - can make huge differences between vehicles even when the same tire and fitment is chosen: for example, a tire make/model and size that would produce minimal road-noise in a 2005 Subaru Legacy can be a lot noisier in a 2005 WRX.

However, how any level of noise and the quality of that sound is perceived also varies from person-to-person, and this can make all the difference in the world. Unfortunately, this is subjective based on that unique person. :grin:



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RE: When to switch -

This is true, with snow tires you should wait as long as possible to put them on, and then take them off as soon as possible after winter. They should only be used when snow or ice is likely. They're noisy and they wear quickly because they're soft by design to provide better snow and ice traction, but they are poor tires for dry conditions.

That said, snow tires provide unparalleled traction in snow or ice. In climates with harsh winters where snow and ice are often encountered, they are much better than all-season tires which are often poor performers in such conditions. <snipped>

Everything has tradeoffs, winter tires are no exception.
This is not what I have heard, read, or do. Every place says to put them on once the temps are consistently below 50 degrees F. Winter tires don't just help when there is snow/ice, but also when there are colder temps.
Actually 45. That may seem like a nitpick for 5 degrees, but that temperature difference can make a difference in the life of the winter tire. And new ones need a little time to get broken in.

I certainly remember growing up in Indiana we had two sets of wheels and tires in the garage for all our vehicles - but that was also in the day when it wasn't an issue to have studded tires, either. Down here, that really doesn't apply, even though we get winter weather, simply because it just doesn't stick around. Yeah, it'll get down to 10 and we'll see snow and ice ... and then three days later, a week at most, and it's back in the mid 50's or even low 60's. So in one respect, I do miss Indiana for being consistent, once the snow falls, you know it's going to be around for a month, but ... no, wait a minute, I really don't miss that at all. :devil:
Over the last decade or so, quantitative testing performed by the various enthusiast, consumer, and government groups overseas - everything ranging from the NAF and ADAC to Car & Driver, and Auto Review - have all suggested that for the best performance (which directly equals safety - i.e. higher maneuvering speeds and stability, shorter braking distances), drivers should seek to truly use tires in the specific conditions for which they are designed: "Winter Tires" for those times when frozen precipitation will be on the roadway, and other seasonal (including "All Season") tires otherwise.

https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2009-winter-tire-test-comparison-tests
[ Yes, this test compares only select Michelin tires, but that in and of itself makes for excellent "internal validity." ]

^ Look at the data there - strangely enough, the popular-in-North-America marketing blurb of "45-degrees (F.) and below" doesn't seem to apply, right?

This is further cross-confirmed by our Russian friends, who, like the Scandinavians, are many years ahead of us in terms of winter-tire knowledge and know-how (don't laugh, as far as just 5 years ago, they were literally light years ahead of us, we've done a lot of great catching-up in the last half-decade). As far back as 2008, Auto Review https://www.zr.ru/content/articles/16286-temperaturnaja_zavisimost/ passed along this wisdom: that there's no need to rush the change in the fall/winter, and no need to delay the change in the spring; provided that there's no wintry precipitation that's going to cause the summer tires to suffer for safety, that there's actually better reasons to stay on the summers for as long as possible. The above referenced Car & Driver article, with its quantified data for four tires crossing the various seasonal genres, proves this to be quite true.

Back in late 2010, I got to interact with some Michelin tire engineers, and I questioned them specifically on why this was the case. The physics of tires, as you know, is an incredibly complex subject, and since I'm a biological scientist who took the easy way out and enrolled in the limited-math "Physics for Bio Majors" course in my undergrad days, I thought that I should just take all of my more complex questions to an actual tire engineer. :smile_big: As it turns out, his answer was really quite simple - and made excellent logical sense. We should realize that a tire generates their own heat as they perform their job on the roadway.

As pro10is noted, it's never an easy, mindless, win-win. There's always a compromise involved.

The biggest concern for when temperatures get that low is when the weather swings unpredictably.

From the raw quantitative data of that Car & Driver, we can see that even when roadway temperatures are below freezing, as long as there is no actual frozen precipitation on those roadway surfaces, the non-winter tires actually perform better than winter tires.

However, as soon as wintry precip. is introduced into the equation, the balance of power shifts drastically [ note: there will also be specific outliers - https://www.subaruforester.org/vbulletin/4337154-post13.html , but in these cases, a careful reading of the data and testing conditions is a must, as will be realizing that what is seen for one particular fitment may not translate to another, especially if the physical parameters of the tire (i.e. void spaces/tread-pattern) change ]

In the real world, what this means for me is that when our weather starts turning cool (for NE-Ohio, this is typically late-October to mid-November), I start keeping a close eye on the forecast. Unfortunately, my lifestyle no longer allows me the luxury of being able to cruise home an hour or two before a storm hits so that I can swap to my winter set - nevertheless, I can still do this on a day-to-day basis: I can look at tomorrow's forecast to determine my actions this evening.

Here's a more nuanced discussion that I participated in on the topic from a while back:

https://legacygt.com/forums/showthread.php/change-winter-tires-145259.html





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As to the topic at-hand, I'm running a set of Bridgestone Blizzak's this winter: their DM V2 in 235/65/18.


A part of me really wanted to try the Cooper Discoverer True North - which shares a lot of tread-pattern similarities with the old Continental ExtremeWinterContact, which received good/excellent test ratings as the ContiViking Contact 5 (https://forums.nasioc.com/forums/showpost.php?p=32123780&postcount=1147 , notably in NAF testing in 2010, it decimated both the Xi2 as well as the WS70, but in the interim, both of those have undergone next-generation changes), but I went instead with a known-quantity as what I really need is a snow-mover.



The True North likely would have better road-manners overall - and it's certainly been tested very favorably, notably by CR.



The problem with moving out of the passenger-vehicle size/weight-class is that there's just so few tests which address the SUV/LT fitments. Things can get shady here, quick.
 

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I went with 245/60/r18 Nokian Hakkapeliitta R3 and RSSW touring rims model AZZ851TGM. For my winter set these are from Canadian dealers. The Hakkapeliitta are a very high rating winter tire from Finland.
Nice. This is the set up I'm looking at. Wondering about going with a 235 > 245. Where did you get your set?
 

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Interested to know where people in the GTA are getting rims/tires. I received a decent price on a set with Subaru specific aftermarket rims. Reading all the tire threads was very helpful, so I reached out to the rim manufacturer to get the load rating to confirm for myself they would work and they unfortunately we’re not load rated for the Ascent.
 

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I have a limited with 20" wheels. I am looking for a set of snow tires and wheels - I want to go to 18" wheels. I haven't been happy with the 20" wheels on gravel and off-road so far. Does anyone have suggestions for aftermarket 18" wheels that will fit the ascent and a good snow tire? I guess I will also need the TPMS sensors.
My 20" wheels work great with my At wildpeak tires. You can change to 18" but I think the main issue are the all season tires you are currently running.
 

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Interested to know where people in the GTA are getting rims/tires. I received a decent price on a set with Subaru specific aftermarket rims. Reading all the tire threads was very helpful, so I reached out to the rim manufacturer to get the load rating to confirm for myself they would work and they unfortunately we’re not load rated for the Ascent.
Hey Brad,
I’ve gone to/dealt with Steelcase Tires for 20yrs.
Know their stuff. Ask for Dave.

I just got my Ascent Limited today- going with VikingContact7 245/60/18 on alloys.
Considered theNokian but can’t digest spending an additional $200.
Cheers
Drew
 

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Hey Brad,
I’ve gone to/dealt with Steelcase Tires for 20yrs.
Know their stuff. Ask for Dave.

I just got my Ascent Limited today- going with VikingContact7 245/60/18 on alloys.
Considered theNokian but can’t digest spending an additional $200.
Cheers
Drew
What rims did you go with? VikingContact are on my list as an option, along with the Yokohama G075 and the Nordman 7. Reviews on the VikingContact are quite positive, so I may try those too.
 

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What rims did you go with? VikingContact are on my list as an option, along with the Yokohama G075 and the Nordman 7. Reviews on the VikingContact are quite positive, so I may try those too.
Dai Prime rims.
Yes, VikingC7 have had stellar reviews even over the Hakka. For me it came down to the Conti VC7 and Pirelli ice zero FR- Conti’s were slightly less with more compelling reviews.
 
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