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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the stock Falken on my car, last winter was a nightmare. I was considering the Michelin cross climate 2 or the Continental cross contact LX25. Any advice, I do not know anything about tires. thanks
 

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I have the stock Falken on my car, last winter was a nightmare. I was considering the Michelin cross climate 2 or the Continental cross contact LX25. Any advice, I do not know anything about tires. thanks
there is a detailed thread on replacement tires. work the search engine. I am in Colorado and use Blizzak for the winter with good results. It appears they will last two and maybe three seasons. I worked a deal with Discount tire to swap them out for two seasons as part of my purchase price.

I replaced my OEM tires for non winter driving at about 32000 miles.
 

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If you don't want to go with dedicated winter tires, then the Michelin CrossClimate2 would be an excellent choice. This tire sets new standards for All-Weather tires which exceed the performance of All-Season tires, especially in winter conditions.

If you need to drive consistently in true Nordic conditions in heavy snow or on icy roads, then you may still wish to consider dedicated winter tires. However, if you only drive occasionally in such conditions, as most people do, even in the Northern US, then All-Weather tires give you a much better compromise on snow, ice, cold, wet, dry, and warm conditions than either All-Season or Winter tires. No other type of tire offers such a wide level of performance in all conditions.
 

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The gotcha with the CrossClimate's is that they are a directional tire and hence they can only be rotated front to back. If you want to rotate in an X pattern, you may need to pay more to have the tire turned around depending on where you get your tire service at. Factor that into the cost of the tire when comparing. Great reviews on this guy though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The gotcha with the CrossClimate's is that they are a directional tire and hence they can only be rotated front to back. If you do want to rotate the typical X pattern, you may need to pay more to have the tire turned around depending on where you get your tire service at. Factor that into the cost of the tire when comparing. Great reviews on this guy though.
thank you, this is my only draw back. I am looking through reviews, I see a lot from a couple of years ago, trying to find the recent ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If you don't want to go with dedicated winter tires, then the Michelin CrossClimate2 would be an excellent choice. This tire sets new standards for All-Weather tires which exceed the performance of All-Season tires, especially in winter conditions.

If you need to drive consistently in true Nordic conditions in heavy snow or on icy roads, then you may still wish to consider dedicated winter tires. However, if you only drive occasionally in such conditions, as most people do, even in the Northern US, then All-Weather tires give you a much better compromise on snow, ice, cold, wet, dry, and warm conditions than either All-Season or Winter tires. No other type of tire offers such a wide level of performance in all conditions.
Here in the northeast, winters don't seem to be what they use to be, not looking to sway out. the guy at the tire store recommended Toyo Celsius CUV or master craft hsx touring, which I'm not finding a lot of reviews on them. Never knew there was a difference between All-Weather and All-Season. Thank you
 

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I live in Canada and our winter is pretty harsh too. My Ascent has a set of BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport LT and work pretty good in winter if you are mainly driving in the city. However, if you are driving a lot on highways or you live in a rural area, I suggest to go for a set of winter tires.
 

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Oh WOW, I never knew there was so much that went into a tire, this is enough to make my head spin. When I start reading reviews, I always seem to come back to this tire. The only thing stopping me is the rotation. thanks for the great info
Right now, I don't see anything that would keeps me from getting these FrossClimate2 tires to replace the originals when the time comes.

I'm personally am not concerned with the front-back only rotation, if you have a good alignment and the tires are properly inflated and balanced. I put 60,000+ miles on a set of Cooper tires with only front-back rotation on my previous vehicle and they were evenly worn with a decent amount of tread left when I sold the truck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Right now, I don't see anything that would keeps me from getting these FrossClimate2 tires to replace the originals when the time comes.

I'm personally am not concerned with the front-back only rotation, if you have a good alignment and the tires are properly inflated and balanced. I put 60,000+ miles on a set of Cooper tires with only front-back rotation on my previous vehicle and they were evenly worn with a decent amount of tread left when I sold the truck.
thanks good to know!
 

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Here in the northeast, winters don't seem to be what they use to be, not looking to sway out. the guy at the tire store recommended Toyo Celsius CUV or master craft hsx touring, which I'm not finding a lot of reviews on them. Never knew there was a difference between All-Weather and All-Season. Thank you
I don't have an Ascent, but in the NE (NJ to be exact) Goodyear Weatherready tires have served me well on my Outback. I will buy these again.
 

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The BFG Advantage TA Sport that I have on my Ascent are "all weather" and have the three peaks rating. I'm very satisfied with them to-date.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I don't have an Ascent, but in the NE (NJ to be exact) Goodyear Weatherready tires have served me well on my Outback. I will buy these again.
Thank you, this was helpful to hear. If I don't go with the Michelin these are the next ones I was considering, I'm in RI.
 

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Don't forget, if it's a Michelin, you've got a day to talk to my friends at @Discount Tire about a purchase that earns you $70 gift card.
 

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The gotcha with the CrossClimate's is that they are a directional tire and hence they can only be rotated front to back. If you want to rotate in an X pattern, you may need to pay more to have the tire turned around depending on where you get your tire service at. Factor that into the cost of the tire when comparing. Great reviews on this guy though.
I contacted Michelin about this and they replied that the front to back rotation would cause no issues with this tire and would not affect the tire's tread warranty. They specifically stated that there is no need to ever dismount the tires to achieve a cross rotation.

All tire manufacturers know when they design directional tires, that front to back rotations will replace X rotations. An X rotation does have some minor advantages, but it is not required.

If your car's wheel alignment is checked regularly, which it should be, your tires will not see uneven wear. Even an X rotation cannot save uneven tire wear caused by wheel mis-alignment.
 

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I hear you. I hear what the manufactures say too.

There was a fellow on this forum that used to work (maybe still does) at Discount Tire and referenced how directional tires and uneven wear was common enough to see:

1. Due to folks neglecting to rotate.
2. The right side generally has more reasons for wear like pot holes, curbs, debris, etc.

This is me totally paraphrasing; or at least, what I got out of it.

As expensive as these tires are, to maximize their life, I would want to flip sides at least 2 or 3 times during its life time. This is me however, and my personal preference.

You could be totally fine with front to back.
 

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Nearly all vehicles will develop directional wear patterns on tires. Vehicle manufacturers have recommended them since...well, since a long time ago. The front tires especially are prone to this because of how suspension geometries work. There's typically a little toe-in on the front and the rear (which creates tire wear problems) and tires need to develop a small slip angle before they start turning the car. All of this is "scrub" on the tires which usually creates feathering or a sawtooth pattern on the outer (and sometimes inner) inch or so of tread.

Not coincidentally, directional tread patterns are almost non-existent for passenger all season tires, though their effectiveness in water and on snowy roads is notable. They're common place (directional patterns) on winter tires and ultra high performance tires where performance is has primacy over noise comfort. Notably, Michelin and Goodyear (and others I'm sure) have both marketed directional patterns in the passenger all season market before -- the Michelin HydroEdge and the Goodyear Assurance TripleTred. Both tires were very popular for a period of time and both were eventually discontinued and replaced with non-directional tread designs. Perhaps the technology just wasn't there yet for these to be successful in the long term.

This Tire Rack test of one of the earlier CrossClimate tires (the CrossClimate SUV) noted the tread noise present...and the CrossClimate was actually eclipsed in snow traction by the conventionally-patterned Continental CrossContact LX25. Tire Rack has tested the CrossClimate2, the newest in the series, and it did well, especially on wet pavement (but was not the quietest tire in the test). I'll be on the sidelines regarding the CrossClimate series of tires, to see how they do in the long term. I imagine some owners of these, especially once sensitive to tire noise, will be wishing they could cross rotate them to help abate the directional wear patterns (which do create tread noise and sometimes even a rough feeling if it gets bad enough). I'm a Michelin tire fan, but it's really just this tire and the Primacy LTX in the 245/50R20 size, neither of which have strong appeal to me. I'm likely interested in the Goodrich tire mentioned in an earlier post, or the Continental CrossContact LX25.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Don't forget, if it's a Michelin, you've got a day to talk to my friends at @Discount Tire about a purchase that earns you $70 gift card.
Thanks, anyone
I contacted Michelin about this and they replied that the front to back rotation would cause no issues with this tire and would not affect the tire's tread warranty. They specifically stated that there is no need to ever dismount the tires to achieve a cross rotation.

All tire manufacturers know when they design directional tires, that front to back rotations will replace X rotations. An X rotation does have some minor advantages, but it is not required.

If your car's wheel alignment is checked regularly, which it should be, your tires will not see uneven wear. Even an X rotation cannot save uneven tire wear caused by wheel mis-alignment.
thank you, great to hear!
 
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