Subaru Ascent Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ugh figuring out towing is driving me crazy. So we have the towing package on our 2020 and we want to get a trailer in the next two years. We don't want another car so we're choosing the trailer around the Ascent. A few months ago we used outdoorsy to rent a 2020 16 ft Airstream Bambi as our first tow attempt. It went pretty well and we learned a lot.

Now the Bambi lists its stats as
gvwr: 3500
Base weight with LP and batteries: 3000
Tongue weight with LP and batteries: 430 lbs

I've been trying for a while to find a trailer that is similar in weight but offers a little bit more than the Bambi, this is the one we're considering: Escape 19 Specifications - Escape Trailer Note it's a dual axle and the bambi is a single

So they list the dry weight (no batteries, LP)
Tongue: 305 lb
Total Dry weight: 3250 lbs
gvwr: 5000 lbs

Great! Seems pretty on part with the Bambi and I'm guessing with propane and batteries the tongue weight will be closer to (75 lbs propane + 55 lb batteries) 440 lbs and the total weight we pull closer to 4200. If all three tanks were full for liquid it would be 600 lbs + food, clothes and plates, books whatever I'm planning on lithium batteries which I think are lighter and I could always do a single propane tank.

So I'm trying to figure out how safe we are with a trailer like this in the worse case scenario, let's say I'm going downhill for two miles in the mountains. The trailer comes with brakes, but would I run into issues if I'm braking a long period? Are there upgrages I can add to the Ascent so the brakes can handle heat more? I'm fine keeping the car at 55 mph and not being in a rush. Pulling the bambi I did get up to 65 for a while just to test it and didn't have any issues but weather was mostly ok minus pacific winds.

Anyone think it's a problem getting a trailer like this? They offer a 17 ft version that loses a few pounds but I'm really hoping for a permanent bed in it :p
 

·
Registered
2019 Subaru Ascent Limited 2010 Subaru Legacy GT limited
Joined
·
645 Posts
If you are on a downhill grade you should use the engine braking as much as you can, either using the paddles in manual mode or drive.
If you plan to do a lot of mountain driving I would hold out for a lighter trailer and maybe upgrade to disc brakes along with better rotors and pads on the ascent as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you are on a downhill grade you should use the engine braking as much as you can, either using the paddles in manual mode or drive.
If you plan to do a lot of mountain driving I would hold out for a lighter trailer and maybe upgrade to disc brakes along with better rotors and pads on the ascent as well.
The passes where I live (Seattle area) aren't too bad but I remember in California some of the passes are pretty intense and want to make sure we are safe if we end up there. If anyone has any experience with better brakes and can recommend I would appreciate it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I have only seen aftermarket rear pads, none for the front.
Better brake fluid will help with fade. I have used Motul 600 in my Impreza track car with never an issue. The fluid is expensive, but there are many choices out there now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,201 Posts
It's always good to check and set the trailer braking level per the operationg manual for your brake controller. It will change with varying weight in the trailer. What I've done for years is warm up the brakes a little with some braking, then go about 10 mph in a level place where I can come to a stop, apply full trailer brakes with the control (knob or lever), and adjust the braking level to just short of locking the trailer brakes. That helps ensure the trailer brakes properly share braking with the tow vehicle.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top