Subaru Ascent Forum banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
I will admit at first that I thought that it was strange that the 11-1 position was not heated, however; with some use I like it this way. When things get a bit warm I’m able to move my hands around to cool off without turning the heater off. It’s nice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
I don’t know if I would say the heat travels. Of course the rest of the wheel will not be ice cold after a bit but it’s a noticeable difference between heated portions and unheated portions. Either way it works.

I had a 17 Grand Cherokee Trailhawk that the heating steering wheel would only stay on for a few minutes before turning off. Let me tell you what, there are some ticked off owners over that on the Jeep forums.

The steering wheel does get quite warm. After about 10 minutes, the heat travels to the unheated of the wheel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
I don’t know if I would say the heat travels. Of course the rest of the wheel will not be ice cold after a bit but it’s a noticeable difference between heated portions and unheated portions. Either way it works.

I had a 17 Grand Cherokee Trailhawk that the heating steering wheel would only stay on for a few minutes before turning off. Let me tell you what, there are some ticked off owners over that on the Jeep forums.
Anything made by Chrysler-Fiat, two of the worst car companies on the planet, is going to be worthy of complaints; they make nothing worth anything. By any reasonable measure, Chrysler, as a company, shouldn't even exist if not for the raping of US taxpayers TWICE due to poor company management and products. The market was not allowed to function due to government meddling and back room deals by a worthless company.

As for the heated steering wheel, Subaru did a bit of a design fail not making the entire thing heated. The arguments that they are encouraging 10 and 2 holding positions is undone by the fact the lower left and right sections are also heated, which is definitely not a good way to hold the steering wheel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
597 Posts
It's not suppose to be - because of the air bags your hands are not suppose to be there.
Yes but when making a turn you shuffle your hands so you then have hot cold hot cold.

I'm think my wife's Hyundai Sonata heats the entire wheel and while I do not put my hands on top while driving most of the large turns where I really grab the top are done when I first get in the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
690 Posts
As for the heated steering wheel, Subaru did a bit of a design fail not making the entire thing heated. The arguments that they are encouraging 10 and 2 holding positions is undone by the fact the lower left and right sections are also heated, which is definitely not a good way to hold the steering wheel.

holding lower left and right sections are not on the way of air bag
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
holding lower left and right sections are not on the way of air bag
Just because some sections are heated and others not doesn't mean people hold the steering wheel that way. You could just as easily be turning the steering wheel when the air bag deploys, thus potentially causing the same injuries. So, you see, it doesn't matter. Just spend the extra $5 and have the entire steering wheel heated and have a better product. Subaru spent too much time copying existing designs from other manufacturers, right down to these little details, rather than improving on them.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,125 Posts
Just because some sections are heated and others not doesn't mean people hold the steering wheel that way. You could just as easily be turning the steering wheel when the air bag deploys, thus potentially causing the same injuries. So, you see, it doesn't matter. Just spend the extra $5 and have the entire steering wheel heated and have a better product. Subaru spent too much time copying existing designs from other manufacturers, right down to these little details, rather than improving on them.
Actually, it does matter. People spend less time doing turns where they're turning the wheel that much than they do driving in a straight line or on gentle curves. There are some of us, myself especially, who rest their arm or hand there - but I at least know I should not (you can see this in my towing video).

So, they lessen the chances of people being hit in the face with their own hand. :tango_face_wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
Actually, it does matter. People spend less time doing turns where they're turning the wheel that much than they do driving in a straight line or on gentle curves. There are some of us, myself especially, who rest their arm or hand there - but I at least know I should not (you can see this in my towing video).

So, they lessen the chances of people being hit in the face with their own hand. :tango_face_wink:
Is that true? If you're driving straight and see an accident about to happen, most people try to swerve in the last few seconds.
 

·
Registered
2019 Ascent Limited, w/ Tech Package
Joined
·
60 Posts
In many DMV manuals, the preferred placement is the 9 and 3 o'clock positions, and the lower 8 and 4 o'clock positions. The only time you are allowed to place your hands on the 12 o'clock position is while backing up the car and you need to turn to look towards the rear of the vehicle. They've also stressed not to have your arms in front of the steering wheel, and to keep them to the sides as much as possible.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,125 Posts
Is that true? If you're driving straight and see an accident about to happen, most people try to swerve in the last few seconds.
No one makes these changes without looking at crash stats, and, nowadays, the car knows exactly what was going on, and Subaru collects that data all the time. So, I doubt it was arbitrary. There was no cost savings in doing this. At most, the few extra inches would have cost them pennies, literally.

So, like all the other things they do (such as gas cap on the passenger side), I am sure it's based on data, since I'm also sure they know that there will be some people annoyed with the decision. :plain:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
No one makes these changes without looking at crash stats, and, nowadays, the car knows exactly what was going on, and Subaru collects that data all the time. So, I doubt it was arbitrary. There was no cost savings in doing this. At most, the few extra inches would have cost them pennies, literally.
My point exactly: it costs nothing to complete the wheel. If they were truly concerned about where people hold the steering wheel, they should have put spikes in the sections they don't want it held in -- or remove the padding or do something else. Just seems weird that not having that section heated only applies during colder months; in warmer months, it doesn't matter as it's not being used.

So, like all the other things they do (such as gas cap on the passenger side), I am sure it's based on data, since I'm also sure they know that there will be some people annoyed with the decision. :plain:
This was actually one of the things I looked forward to on this car: the passenger-side fuel door. Since most cars are driver's side, the passenger side one, especially in my dumb state (Oregon) where all gas fill-ups are required by law to be full-service, more cars stack up on the left pumps than the right. I have already seen this change work to my advantage a few times, getting fuel slightly faster. On the downside, it makes the attendant have to walk farther to get and return your credit card.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
most cars gas cut is opposite side from single tail pipe ...
the only car i can recall right now to have tail pipe and gas cap on same side is a Subaru...
I have a different theory: the gas fill-up and, thus, the gas tank is on the passenger side on Subarus to balance the car left and right. A full tank of gas weights a fair amount and will help offset the weight of a driver (alone, of course). However, your theory is also very reasonable as the exhaust piping and components can get in the way of the fuel tank. Perhaps it is a little of both? :tango_face_wink:
 

·
Registered
2019 Ascent Limited, w/ Tech Package
Joined
·
60 Posts
most cars gas cut is opposite side from single tail pipe ...
the only car i can recall right now to have tail pipe and gas cap on same side is a Subaru...
I think the Forrester and Impreza is the only exception where the singular tail pipe is on the same side as the gas cap. On my former Outbacks and Legacy, the tail pipe was on the driver's side. The same goes for the Crosstrek.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,125 Posts
Figures and Fun Stuff

My point exactly: it costs nothing to complete the wheel. If they were truly concerned about where people hold the steering wheel, they should have put spikes in the sections they don't want it held in -- or remove the padding or do something else. Just seems weird that not having that section heated only applies during colder months; in warmer months, it doesn't matter as it's not being used.
LOL my friend, now you're just being silly. We both know that even people who are diligent at 10/2 position use that part of the steering wheel regularly for things like U-turns or other tight turning.

I have a different theory: the gas fill-up and, thus, the gas tank is on the passenger side on Subarus to balance the car left and right. A full tank of gas weights a fair amount and will help offset the weight of a driver (alone, of course). However, your theory is also very reasonable as the exhaust piping and components can get in the way of the fuel tank. Perhaps it is a little of both? :tango_face_wink:
It has no relevance to the tailpipe. It's because there's data showing that people get hit by passing cars when standing on the highway with a gas can after having run out of gas. The US being the biggest market means we were the region that dictated the position. Japan, China and Australia being next. You'll also note that we have a lot more traffic fatalities than either of those two. We have 10.6 per 100,000 residents, to Australia's 5.4 per and Japan's 4.7 per.

While China has a lot more road incidents (18.3 per), China drives on the same side of the road as us and thus benefits from the gas filler placement.

The US and Canada account for 65-70% of all Subaru car sales.

You'll note that the Ascent gas tank design has no shape or pipe related requirements for the filler tube placement. And of course, keep in mind, the Ascent was always designed as a 2 tail pipe vehicle, and other Subies use ONE tailpipe all the way past the gas tank and then (in the case of the H6 and performance H4s) split it decently after the gas tank).

 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top