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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anybody used the program? Dealer is going to do it for me but when you read the exclusions basically everyone is excluded until the end of there loan and the car is paid off.

Assuming my dealer is going to pay off my car and get my title to them on there own dime and get Subaru reimbursed. Maybe those terms are for smaller dealers who don’t do this?
 

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You can do it yourself online.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Current Subaru vehicle cannot be titled in a business, retailer, bank or finance company name.
 

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Titled is different than having a lien on it.
 

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Registration here is in my name. Title is in the banks name until you pay it off with the lender listed as the current owner. That’s how almost all states do it
Actually, no, that's not how almost all states do it. Many states title it in the person's name, and put a lien on it in the bank's name. Some states hold that title, as lien holder, but it's still not titled to them. One such is California. In others, such as New York, I have my title, and the bank is on it as the lien holder. And yet others vary beyond that.

If yours truly shows them as owner, and not lien holder, then, I'd call Subaru and ask how they handle that. I've only handled this on the other end, where, we, as the bank (I did auto finance, way back when) are a lien holder or otherwise, so, the car was ours to dispose of upon certain types of payment defaults (varies per state as well).

I do not recall whether your state lists the bank as owner, and I think the bank holds the title. I also know your state does a lien release on titles as part of normal operations, so, that would seem to indicate that the bank is listed as lien holder, and acts as title holder as well.

Do you physically have your title?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Actually, no, that's not how almost all states do it. Many states title it in the person's name, and put a lien on it in the bank's name. Some states hold that title, as lien holder, but it's still not titled to them. One such is California. In others, such as New York, I have my title, and the bank is on it as the lien holder. And yet others vary beyond that.

If yours truly shows them as owner, and not lien holder, then, I'd call Subaru and ask how they handle that. I've only handled this on the other end, where, we, as the bank (I did auto finance, way back when) are a lien holder or otherwise, so, the car was ours to dispose of upon certain types of payment defaults (varies per state as well).

I do not recall whether your state lists the bank as owner, and I think the bank holds the title. I also know your state does a lien release on titles as part of normal operations, so, that would seem to indicate that the bank is listed as lien holder, and acts as title holder as well.

Do you physically have your title?
I can’t request the title because it’s not in my name. My dealer said they won’t have any issue doing it. But I was just wondering if anybody had any trouble on this. When I was price shopping another dealer in my state the moment I said my car was financed they were all you have to bring your car to us to get the trade value. Prior to them knowing that they said they would honor the price listed on the mysubaru account.
 

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I can’t request the title because it’s not in my name. My dealer said they won’t have any issue doing it. But I was just wondering if anybody had any trouble on this. When I was price shopping another dealer in my state the moment I said my car was financed they were all you have to bring your car to us to get the trade value. Prior to them knowing that they said they would honor the price listed on the mysubaru account.
You misunderstood my question. Whether you have the title or not does not mean the bank owns the car. In various states, where the bank is the lien holder, the bank also physically "holds" the title until they release the lien, but they are NOT the owner. California is one of many examples.

A bank holding the title does not mean they are listed as the owner on that title.

So, the reason I was asking if you had yours was to see what it says. Alas, you do not. I am not familiar with your state, as I only dealt with it incidentally, and a very long time ago.

Regardless, in a state where the bank holds the title, yes, you'd have to contact them, or have the dealership handle it. Nonetheless, that doesn't mean you cannot work out the GTP price yourself.

IF I recall correctly, there's an owner section on your title, and a mail to section. I just can't 100% remember how it's filled out, who's names go where, etc.

This, for instance, is a California title. As mentioned, the bank holds it until the loan is paid, at which time, they submit it with a lien release to DMV, and DMV ships one without lien to the owner.

The owner is listed under "Registered Owner" towards the top. The bank is listed at the bottom under "Lienholder". I think your state is the same. That would make you the owner, and them the holder (lien holder). It does the same for titles with liens... I just don't remember how that works with banks.

Regardless, literally every state is different, either in small bits, or in large aspects. No one can answer you without knowing what state you're in, and ANY answer from a DIFFERENT state doesn't likely apply.

As I said, I did this for a living, for Marine Midland Bank, when we were also Saab Scania Corporation, Subaru Credit Corporation (before Chase took over as Subaru Motors Corp), Ford Motor Credit, Porsche Financial Services, and more.

It's easiest if you ask your bank - the people who service your auto loan should know all the relevant info. Or your DMV, but that's usually a LOT more painful.

674
 

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Why would Subaru list that in exclusions if it’s something never done?
You misread what I said. No fault of yours, I dumped a lot of info to try to explain it for everyone.

SHORT VERSION:
In most states, the lienholder doesn't own the vehicle. Being a title holder is not the same as owning the vehicle either. Call Subaru of America, your bank, or your state's DMV and ask if your bank is listed as lienholder or as owner. That they hold the title is not relevant to that question.

If they are listed as lienholder, then YOU can arrange your GTP, get the certificate, and the dealership will work with the bank for the title release.
 
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