Subaru Ascent Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,726 Posts
I did the same although surprisingly my 16 year old son loved the Ascent and the safety features he wanted a Subaru and purchased a 2018 Impreza. We specifically chose a year that had all the safety features. This January we are going to Steamboat Springs for him to learn to drive on ice at the Bridgestone Winter Driving School. They provide the vehicle but I look forward to driving the Ascent up to Steamboat and playing around in the snow.
 

·
Super Moderator
2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
Joined
·
3,896 Posts
When our daughter got her license, there was a need for a safe vehicle for her to drive. Since my spouse's MY11 Outback Limited was paid for, The Princess got that to drive and my spouse, AKA, Professor Dr. SWMBO, got a new MY16 Outback Limited with Eyesight. Our daughter is currently a junior at PSU and our plan is for the MY16 to be her graduation gift (much lower milage and nicer with more goodies than the MY11) and once again for The Professor to get a new Subaru. Darling daughter piles on the miles so she's going to be better served with the newer vehicle as she starts out on her own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Almost 2 years ago I bought an 18 Outback and loved the eyesight so much, I bought a 19 Ascent about 8 months ago. Own 2 Subaru now.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,449 Posts
I'm going to start a gofundme so ya'll can fund my children's future Subarus. Currently they're going to get something that's $1000 or less!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
we loved our OB 2015 with eyesight (wife didn't want it first required salesmen to show how to turn off then fell in love with it now its required ) so when our daughter needed a car she bought a forester touring which she will drive and teach our daughter (now has learners permit) roll it over to her this summer then get another car. subi x 2
out OB has 56k miles my oldest daughter drives this as her mom handed over her car to her after 3 years nothing but routine maintenance 100% trouble free and safe. OB has remote start so as she parks her car away from her dorms will love that feature.

very pleased with our OB and 2019 forester.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
No concerns that your children learn to drive with the eyesight "crutch?" What happens the first time they need a rental?
I'm thinking old-school manual transmission to keep both hands occupied.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
920 Posts
No concerns that your children learn to drive with the eyesight "crutch?" What happens the first time they need a rental?
I'm thinking old-school manual transmission to keep both hands occupied.
The most dangerous time is while they are learning to drive. The more miles under the belt, the safer they become as not everything is overwhelming so they can pay attention to more things. Eyesight helps pay attention to the things they aren't always paying attention to. So by the time they are able to do a rental, or drive another car, they'll be much more experienced and safer. Plus better to have the safety features most of the time and drive without occasionally, rather than the other way around.

My fiance's daughter recently learned to drive (6 months ago now). I insisted she go to Team Safety Driving School and even paid for it. After the 8 hrs of driving that day, she was already more confident and also knew how to panic stop and do avoidance maneuvers.

I was trying to also have them get an Imprezza or Crosstrek with eyesight, but it was a bit too expensive. They did find a 2013 Ford Focus with <10k miles on it for a great price.

If I can afford it, in 4 years when my son starts to drive, I plan to get a Tesla Model 3 performance for my commuter car and let him drive the Ascent. Or I can swap it around when I need to tow and just limit the M3 performance for his driving.

So the short story is, teach them how to drive properly and safely, but add as much insurance that they stay safe as you can!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,986 Posts
A good on course defensive/evasive driving course is an amazing thing! I agree with @Kevin Williams about the benefits of them. I never took an official one, but, my father was ex-military turned driving instructor, turned police officer, so, I kind of got the unofficial version day in and day out. It was an interesting dichotomy of learning all the fun stuff in a parking lot, exactly what the car can do, and exactly how to react to various circumstances, to then being on the road with the man and needing to make sure every stop, turn and signal was textbook perfect. :ROFLMAO:

One of the other things I learned was that when and where safe to do so, to learn my car and what it can and cannot do. It's tough to find places, times and safe ways of doing such, but it's nice nonetheless.
 

·
Super Moderator
2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
Joined
·
3,896 Posts
No concerns that your children learn to drive with the eyesight "crutch?"
When I see features like Eyesight referred to as a "crutch" it makes me chuckle. Having a system that warns of potentially unseen hazards and helps the drive take action in very dangerous situations is just icing on the cake. It doesn't take away the requirement for the driver to be in control and it would be foolish for anyone to "depend" upon it like the work "crutch" implies, at least to me. Human drivers make mistakes and can only react so fast. There is zero down-side to features like Eyesight or equivalents, IMHO. There's no change to how the learning to drive process should happen just as there's no change to the way we should drive, with or without, these additional features. I will not buy a vehicle without them.
 
  • Like
Reactions: xydadx3

·
Registered
Joined
·
920 Posts
When I see features like Eyesight referred to as a "crutch" it makes me chuckle. Having a system that warns of potentially unseen hazards and helps the drive take action in very dangerous situations is just icing on the cake. It doesn't take away the requirement for the driver to be in control and it would be foolish for anyone to "depend" upon it like the work "crutch" implies, at least to me. Human drivers make mistakes and can only react so fast. There is zero down-side to features like Eyesight or equivalents, IMHO. There's no change to how the learning to drive process should happen just as there's no change to the way we should drive, with or without, these additional features. I will not buy a vehicle without them.
Yes, this is not the Tesla auto drive, which would greatly reduce a new driver's learning! It's just warnings to not get into too much trouble!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Robert.Mauro

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,726 Posts
No concerns that your children learn to drive with the eyesight "crutch?" What happens the first time they need a rental?
I'm thinking old-school manual transmission to keep both hands occupied.
Next year I plan on teaching my 16 year old how to drive a manual transmission. He already has expressed an interest for a manual Subie. He learned on an automatic but very low tech vehicle and competed both his drivers ed and driving license test on a vehicle without any safety tech. While I want him to learn how to drive these vehicles I also prefer the safety technology that is available. The number of vehicles on the road has grown enormously so the inherant risks have grown as well. If he can avail himself of added safety notifications and responses I am all for it. My main focus is traveling with safety as a main priority.
 

·
Super Moderator
2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
Joined
·
3,896 Posts
The number of vehicles on the road has grown enormously so the inherant risks have grown as well. If he can avail himself of added safety notifications and responses I am all for it. My main focus is traveling with safety as a main priority.
Ditto. And it's not just about the volume of vehicles...it's about how way too many folks out there drive. I cannot even count how many times that "blind spot warning" saved my bacon over the 7 years I was driving my previous vehicle with a lot of highway travel for business on the I-95 corridor between SE PA and Washington DC. Vehicles weaving in and out of traffic lanes at very high speeds are hard to detect visually and quite often, those of us signaling to attempt a lane change would be suddenly surprised by someone crossing multiple lanes behind us and right into the space we were about to occupy for our legal maneuver. I would say that on at least three occasions, I was "this close" to death or serious injury because of that but the warning (audible, not just visual) on my ride kept me from disaster. I happen to be a very careful and observant driver as it it, but still...so I embrace any and all such safety features and am happy that my daughter is also driving a Subaru. That one doesn't have eyesight, but she'll be getting our MY16 as a college graduation present and it is equipped with the technology.
 
  • Like
Reactions: packout

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,726 Posts
Ditto. And it's not just about the volume of vehicles...it's about how way too many folks out there drive. I cannot even count how many times that "blind spot warning" saved my bacon over the 7 years I was driving my previous vehicle with a lot of highway travel for business on the I-95 corridor between SE PA and Washington DC. Vehicles weaving in and out of traffic lanes at very high speeds are hard to detect visually and quite often, those of us signaling to attempt a lane change would be suddenly surprised by someone crossing multiple lanes behind us and right into the space we were about to occupy for our legal maneuver. I would say that on at least three occasions, I was "this close" to death or serious injury because of that but the warning (audible, not just visual) on my ride kept me from disaster. I happen to be a very careful and observant driver as it it, but still...so I embrace any and all such safety features and am happy that my daughter is also driving a Subaru. That one doesn't have eyesight, but she'll be getting our MY16 as a college graduation present and it is equipped with the technology.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,449 Posts
When I see features like Eyesight referred to as a "crutch" it makes me chuckle. Having a system that warns of potentially unseen hazards and helps the drive take action in very dangerous situations is just icing on the cake. It doesn't take away the requirement for the driver to be in control and it would be foolish for anyone to "depend" upon it like the work "crutch" implies, at least to me.
in a perfect world...
But in fairness many people are probably blissfully ignorant about the limits of eyesight so they’ll play conservative and react the way they should and eyesight should supplement that.
Some others, myself included, like to know and push the limits. I’m always in control and ready to react but let the car do the work when I can.
then there’s the others that’llassume it can drive itself and try to do so. Those are the ones to watch out for!

frankly though, I’m tired of slamming on the brakes and spilling my coffee in the morning because someone changed lanes into me without looking at anything but maybe a blind spot monitor. 3x this week! Rant over...
 

·
Super Moderator
2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
Joined
·
3,896 Posts
But in fairness many people are probably blissfully ignorant about the limits of eyesight so they’ll play conservative and react the way they should and eyesight should supplement that.
Which is exactly how folks should operate their vehicles...be in control to the best of their abilities and be happy if Eyesight or similar "saves the bacon" that one time when the unexpected quickly happens. :)

I actually do use Eyesight's ACC in heavy, slow, stop and go traffic when traveling...it works well and cuts fatigue a whole bunch. But my foot is still right there near the brake pedal just in case the whole time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
When I see features like Eyesight referred to as a "crutch" it makes me chuckle. Having a system that warns of potentially unseen hazards and helps the drive take action in very dangerous situations is just icing on the cake. It doesn't take away the requirement for the driver to be in control and it would be foolish for anyone to "depend" upon it like the work "crutch" implies, at least to me.
No offense meant to anyone, but these forum pages abound with people talking about how they use LKA on urban highways and ACC in just about any situation. (Not that I disagree with the latter). Prior to the Ascent, I've never had blind spot warning or anything else (beyond conventional cruise control), yet I've managed to avoid any collisions through my driving habits. I know my driving habits are changing in the Ascent to take advantage of the Eyesight features. I don't know how I'd react if I had learned an Eyesight vehicle as the default and then had to drive something else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
298 Posts
Too bad they haven't added the driver fatigue/distraction feature like in the newest other models (Forester, etc). That is something I would want in my next car. In the past, I have had a few close calls, when I nodded off, and woke up on the shoulder. I used to do very long drives, and there were times I really struggled hard to keep my eyes open and stay alert. Luckily, I never had an accident. That was back in my younger foolish days. I don't do that now.

Maybe the current LKA would wake me up today, but have never "tested" that scenario. But I did read on another forum (not Subaru) where a guy nodded off and hit a parked car at 30 mph. Luckily, his airbags saved him, and no serious injuries. But this feature probably would have prevented the accident.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,726 Posts
No offense meant to anyone, but these forum pages abound with people talking about how they use LKA on urban highways and ACC in just about any situation. (Not that I disagree with the latter). Prior to the Ascent, I've never had blind spot warning or anything else (beyond conventional cruise control), yet I've managed to avoid any collisions through my driving habits. I know my driving habits are changing in the Ascent to take advantage of the Eyesight features. I don't know how I'd react if I had learned an Eyesight vehicle as the default and then had to drive something else.
My first loaner did not have blind spot so I was happy to realize I still paid attention. I have never caused an accident in 46 years of driving.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top