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Large microfiber towels

https://www.detailedimage.com/DI-Microfiber-M13/Waffle-Weave-Drying-Towel-P100/36-x-24-S1/

Linked above is the towel that I prefer.


Pull the towel in one direction (do not wipe back and forth, will cause swirls/scratches) to dry. When it's waterlogged, just wring it out and keep going. Let everything air dry afterwards. If you have access to an air compressor, use it to blow water out of seams between body panels, in door jambs, and from crevices in the wheels. Do not wash or dry in direct sunlight.

The website mentions "sheeting method" which is beneficial since it will remove most of the water before the towels get to it. You essentially introduce a large volume of water at a controlled rate to "sheet" the water across the paint, which will pull most of the water off the paint with it, leaving behind only small areas that need drying. You can do this with a water hose that has no attachment, just hold it near the paint surface so the water glides across the paint (not hitting and splashing everywhere). This will drastically reduce the amount of work/effort required to dry the paint, and you won't finish drying one section and have a towel that is already soaked in water.

The majority of swirling/scratching comes from the wash, however. Dirty water, dirty sponge/mitt, using a brush, or going to one of those awful wash bays with the pressure washers and brushes full of who knows what.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Pull the towel in one direction (do not wipe back and forth, will cause swirls/scratches) to dry. When it's waterlogged, just wring it out and keep going. Let everything air dry afterwards. Do not wash or dry in direct sunlight.
The website mentions "sheeting method" which is beneficial since it will remove most of the water before the towels get to it. You essentially introduce a large volume of water at a controlled rate to "sheet" the water across the paint, which will pull most of the water off the paint with it, leaving behind only small areas that need drying. You can do this with a water hose that has no attachment, just hold it near the paint surface so the water glides across the paint (not hitting and splashing everywhere). This will drastically reduce the amount of work/effort required to dry the paint, and you won't finish drying your hood and have a towel that is completely soaked in water.

The majority of swirling/scratching comes from the wash, however. Dirty water, dirty sponge/mitt, using a brush, or going to one of those awful wash bays with the pressure washers and brushes full of who knows what.[/QUOTE]

Thank you so much!! I am planning to get my vehicle this week. Good to know on washing it as well to use hose without attachment.
 

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Thank you so much!! I am planning to get my vehicle this week. Good to know on washing it as well to use hose without attachment.
There is a lot of information online, particularly Youtube (visuals). I think AMMO NYC's channel covers some of the car wash/dry basics well; but he's focused on the entirety of detailing. He's now sponsored by /DRIVE and he references his own product line a lot (which I've found are good products) but he also provides budget friendly alternatives in some situations and probably has one of the better channels from an educational standpoint.
 

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I like using a good waffle weave towel and a drying aid like opti-seal or ultima paint guard plus.

If i know the car doesn't have any dirt on it i'll use a California Blade. Super quick and fun to use.
 

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Leaf blower.
I've used my Echo leaf blower in the past for this, but I think I need something with more of a "narrower" tip to really push the air out faster.
 

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I've used my Echo leaf blower in the past for this, but I think I need something with more of a "narrower" tip to really push the air out faster.
I can't say with 100% certainty that I'm not making this up but I do seem to recall someone, somewhere, explaining how this introduces contaminants to the paint. Something about dirty air and 2-stroke exhaust if I'm remembering right.
 

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I've used my Echo leaf blower in the past for this, but I think I need something with more of a "narrower" tip to really push the air out faster.
I can't say with 100% certainty that I'm not making this up but I do seem to recall someone, somewhere, explaining how this introduces contaminants to the paint. Something about dirty air and 2-stroke exhaust if I'm remembering right.
I'm of the same belief. Not absolutely sure it's not a myth, however, it does make sense.

What is ideal would be warm clean (filtered) air. Which I guess is why they make these:

https://www.amazon.com/Air-Force-Bl...926101&sr=8-10&keywords=air+blaster+car+dryer

A little expensive though but if you're trying to keep your paint swirl free, it's the way to go.
 

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I've used my Echo leaf blower in the past for this, but I think I need something with more of a "narrower" tip to really push the air out faster.
I can't say with 100% certainty that I'm not making this up but I do seem to recall someone, somewhere, explaining how this introduces contaminants to the paint. Something about dirty air and 2-stroke exhaust if I'm remembering right.
I'm of the same belief. Not absolutely sure it's not a myth, however, it does make sense.
Electric leaf blower then, Toro's has a couple tip options: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Toro-Ul...-12-Amp-Blower-Vacuum-Mulcher-51619/205746070

Plus a possible little mix of 2 stroke exhaust would pale in comparison to smog and car exhaust in general all day every day on the road. I would think it possibly sucking in debris and grit and throwing it at the car would be worse (also neglibible in my mind) but that should be manageable.
 

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Get a good quality waffle weave towel. Dry in one direction and not in circles. Dry in the direction of sight lines. So don't dry the side of the car in an up and down. Go left to right. Work from the top down. Don't use that towel on your wheels. If you drop your towel on the ground just grab a new one. Spend the few bucks on better towels.

Air compressors work, but they can spit oil or if it is older and you never drain the tank have rust and water inside them.
Leaf blowers are a toss up.

Stick to a good towel. Wash your towels without any fabric softener after use. Have dedicated towels. I use the waffle on the large parts, and microfiber for the jambs. Do use the dry towel on your wheels.

There are tons of videos to "advance" your washing method. If you spend the once every 6 months time really washing your car and getting a good paint sealant and wax on the car, the next wash and drys are so much quicker because the water and dirt just rolls right off.
 

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Air compressors work, but they can spit oil or if it is older and you never drain the tank have rust and water inside them.
Leaf blowers are a toss up.
I was thinking about what i said in the earlier post and realized I kind of take for granted that I have a line filter. It is definitely a valid concern. You don't just take any air compressor to your paint and having a good line filter is a must if you're going to use it on your car.
 
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