Subaru Ascent Forum banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good morning, I currently have the factory 20s on my 2020 Ascent and I'm looking to buy some winter tires along with rims before the snow starts falling. In the past, I've just gone with steel rims but want to get some fancier ones for the Ascent so I'm considering buying used. I've read through the forums and I'm under the impression that the Ascent is a difficult fit due to brake calipers so I've tried to stay as close to possible to the factory 18s.

Just wondering if anyone can comment on these and give me their opinion whether these will fit or not:

 

·
Super Moderator
2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
Joined
·
3,841 Posts
There are plenty of aftermarket wheels in 18" that fit the Ascent and also meet the minimum load requirements...there's a huge thread here that discusses wheel/tire options as well as many other ones. That said, if I'm not mistaken, those tires will be smaller in diameter than the OEM 245/60R18 because of the narrower width. Further, you need to ascertain exactly what wheels those are so you can determine if they are rated for the minimum 1850 lbs required by the Ascent. The ad is too terse to know that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Excellent point about verifying the weight ratings, I'll follow up with the seller. As for the 235 vs 245 width, I read in these forums that some people prefer a narrower tire for winter driving. I'm not a tire person and really don't have an opinion, I'm just trying to save a couple of bucks on some used tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,162 Posts
My experience def favors narrower tires for winter, but IDK how consequential 235 vs 245 would be. For dedicated winter snows, 235 should be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
495 Posts
Another way to consider this move....do you like the way the 20s ride? For me, I did not. Come winter, I bought a set of Blizzaks in the 20" OEM size to mount to the factory rims. I think they handle better than the Falkens in non-snow conditions, but would obviously wear much faster. I then got a set of 18" rims and a tire that I would want to run for the 99% of the time that I didn't need snows. It will cost more, but the improvement in ride quality and performance for me was worth it.

But yes, you will find that many "steel" rims used for a winter set will not clear the giant calipers or won't have an acceptable load rating. If you still want to go this route, you may be to find OEM 18s to run as a snow set.
 

·
Super Moderator
2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
Joined
·
3,841 Posts
Excellent point about verifying the weight ratings, I'll follow up with the seller. As for the 235 vs 245 width, I read in these forums that some people prefer a narrower tire for winter driving. I'm not a tire person and really don't have an opinion, I'm just trying to save a couple of bucks on some used tires.
You can go narrower, but the aspect ratio has to change to keep the tire height. 60% of 235cm is smaller than 60% of 245cm...and as someone pointed out, the specific tires must still be rated for the same load, etc., at a minimum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,312 Posts
Rather than investing in another set of wheels, you may wish to seriously consider a set of Michelin Cross Climate 2 tires which are superb for use all year round. These are not all-season tires, but rather a new breed of all-weather tires which are rated for severe ice and snow driving. While not quite as effective as winter tires on heavy snow and ice, they come very close and are superior in wet and dry conditions than typical snow tires which are poor performers in anything other than snow and ice.

With this new breed of tires available, the only reason people should still consider snow tires is if they constantly drive in Nordic type conditions and drive on heavy snow and ice more than they drive on cleared roads. This type of driving is rare in the US. Far more typically most drivers, even in the northern snow belt where I live, mostly drive on cleared roads or light snow in the winter and only need to occasionally drive in heavy snow and ice during storms and before the roads are cleared.

So, unless you live in an area with Nordic type conditions, you may be better off with all-weather tires.

See this post for more information.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
559 Posts
I was just looking at the Michelin Cross Climate2 for my wife's minivan (Honda Odyssey). She doesn't bring it into the snow areas. We get rain from Nov-March here with the heaviest rains Jan/Feb. Otherwise most of her driving is in the dry. As compared to other all season tires, are the Cross Climate2 tires more geared towards wet weather and snow driving at the expense of dry performance?

Rather than investing in another set of wheels, you may wish to seriously consider a set of Michelin Cross Climate 2 tires which are superb for use all year round. These are not all-season tires, but rather a new breed of all-weather tires which are rated for severe ice and snow driving. While not quite as effective as winter tires on heavy snow and ice, they come very close and are superior in wet and dry conditions than typical snow tires which are poor performers in anything other than snow and ice.

With this new breed of tires available, the only reason people should still consider snow tires is if they constantly drive in Nordic type conditions and drive on heavy snow and ice more than they drive on cleared roads. This type of driving is rare in the US. Far more typically most drivers, even in the northern snow belt where I live, mostly drive on cleared roads or light snow in the winter and only need to occasionally drive in heavy snow and ice during storms and before the roads are cleared.

So, unless you live in an area with Nordic type conditions, you may be better off with all-weather tires.

See this post for more information.
 

·
Super Moderator
2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
Joined
·
3,841 Posts
As compared to other all season tires, are the Cross Climate2 tires more geared towards wet weather and snow driving at the expense of dry performance?
No, they are geared to perform well in all conditions/all seasons.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pro10is

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,312 Posts
I was just looking at the Michelin Cross Climate2 for my wife's minivan (Honda Odyssey). She doesn't bring it into the snow areas. We get rain from Nov-March here with the heaviest rains Jan/Feb. Otherwise most of her driving is in the dry. As compared to other all season tires, are the Cross Climate2 tires more geared towards wet weather and snow driving at the expense of dry performance?
Here are the CR ratings for Michelin Cross Climate+ tires. The Cross Climate2 tires are an updated improvement.
5536


By comparison, here are the CR ratings for some popular snow tires:

5537

5538

5539


5540

5541
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Hi, need some advice please?

The details - We just traded our almost 8yr old 2013 Tribeca for a 2021 Ascent, and I have read that the stock Falken ZIEX are poor for winter driving. We live in a hilly area in Colorado at 6500 feet, and our winter tire choice can be the difference between making it home in bad weather or not.

We kept our old Yokahama Ice guard 255/55-18R winter tires, which are within 2% of the rolling circumference of the 245/50-20 that come with the Ascent. So, if we put them on 18" wheels, the speedo will say 60 mph when were are actually going 61 mph.

The old tires worked great last winter, are about 3yr old, and look like they have 2-3 more winter seasons left on them (early Nov thru middle of April). I'm guessing there is about 6/32" or 7/32" of tread left, which started at 10/32" when new. On my WRX when my Yokahama got down to 5/32" they didn't perform much better than an all-season on slushy snow, while my Blizzak WS80 did well even down to 3/32". But I drive much more aggressively than my wife, and I got 4 winters out of my Yokahama. So her's are not toast.

My Question - Would you guys use a 6/32" tread Yokahama winter tire and spend $600-700 on a set of aftermarket 18" wheels and another $100-160 for TPMS sensors to keep using the old 18" Yokahama tires, or would you just go for a nice set of 20" winter tires for about $750-$950 for the set?

If I get the spare set of 18" wheels then I can spend less on 18" winter tires when they need replacing 2 years from now. But I have my WRX winter tires mounted on STi BBS rims and it's hard to get them up from the basement. My wife is complaining that since I'm disabled that she will have to haul up the heavier winter wheel-tires combo than just hauling up tires alone. Her vote is for the new tires, and then find someone to buy the old ones (not easy). Thanks!

EDIT - in my experience, the Yokahama may keep up with Blizzak and Michelin X-Ice xi3 in snow traction but it doesn't compare nearly as well when in icy conditions. That's the only reason why I might just want to do a better 20" winter tire now, instead of re-using the 18" Ice Guard. Also, we have the Michelin X-ice Xi3 for our WRX, Forester XT, and Jeep Grand Cherokee. All three used to be on Yokahama and we moved up - so maybe my answer is right in front of me. I was just worried about saving money after buying our most expensive car ever.
 

·
Super Moderator
2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
Joined
·
3,841 Posts
Your options are valid. But you can also consider one of the new generation of all weather tires like the new Michelin CrossContact that have been discussed here. They supposedly are better than the X-ice but can stay on the vehicle year-round.

That said, if you're going to do dedicated winter tires, I'd invest in the 18" rims and TPMS so that changing them fall and spring is a lot simpler. Mounting/remounting two sets of tires on one set of wheels comes with its own hassles.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DocJekl

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Your options are valid. But you can also consider one of the new generation of all weather tires like the new Michelin CrossContact that have been discussed here. They supposedly are better than the X-ice but can stay on the vehicle year-round.

That said, if you're going to do dedicated winter tires, I'd invest in the 18" rims and TPMS so that changing them fall and spring is a lot simpler. Mounting/remounting two sets of tires on one set of wheels comes with its own hassles.
Thanks. Did you mean Michelin CrossContact or CrossClimate2? With 2 of our 4 vehicles we do a mount and balance with seasonal tires every Halloween and every Easter for our switch out dates.

That’s what my wife would like to continue to do, because it’s easier to haul up just the tires for my daughters car or her car than it is to bring up the complete wheel/tire combination like my WRX or my son’s Forester XT. The process is cheaper if we buy our tires from our Subaru dealer because then they will do the seasonal mount and balance at no charge.

My WRX is actually a little bit on the extreme side because I keep 3 sets of wheel/tires. I have Michelin Pilot Sport 4s performance tires on bronze gold BBS STI wheels for June through September. Then I have my yellow gold BBS rims with Continental extreme contact DWS for October & November and again in April & May, with the ugly stock WRX rims being used for Michelin X ice XI3 from Thanksgiving through spring break. NowI don’t worry about scraping up my nice rims when I’m driving in the snow, and 8 months out of the year I can enjoy better handling on my WRX.

I drive the WRX through corners fairly aggressively during the summer, and don’t want to wear out all seasons fast enough that they would not be very good even for the first wet snow of the year in October. And the last time I used a summer-only tire with no all-seasons, and it snowed in the middle of October, I was unable to drive my car until the snow melted (didn’t have extra wheels back then to swap myself). Hence three sets - my wife hates it.

Last fall I was able to make room in our garage for 8 of my 12 wheel/tire accommodations (one set is on the car). But there is no more room in the garage for any other tire wheel combinations. I’d have to get rid of some garage stuff to make room for her wheels/tires upstairs. So my son’s heavy winter tires/wheels combo for Forester XT still get stored in the basement.

I think that I’m still pretty set on having dedicated winter tires, even though my wife would be OK with good snow rated all seasons.
 

·
Super Moderator
2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
Joined
·
3,841 Posts
The new CrossClimate...sorry if I fat-fingered that.

I'm running the BFG T/A Sports which are also the new all weather type (mountain peaks plus M&S), although we get almost zero snow here. I wanted Defenders, but they don't come in our OEM size for 20" wheels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
The new CrossClimate...sorry if I fat-fingered that.

I'm running the BFG T/A Sports which are also the new all weather type (mountain peaks plus M&S), although we get almost zero snow here. I wanted Defenders, but they don't come in our OEM size for 20" wheels.
How do you like them?
 

·
Super Moderator
2019 Ascent Touring (CWP)
Joined
·
3,841 Posts
Honestly, despite not putting on a lot of miles recently for obvious reasons, I'm liking them a lot. Quiet, comfortable, good handling, look nice and zero mileage hit. In fact, my mileage is a hair better from it's already good 20.5 local average.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DocJekl

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Rather than investing in another set of wheels, you may wish to seriously consider a set of Michelin Cross Climate 2 tires which are superb for use all year round. These are not all-season tires, but rather a new breed of all-weather tires which are rated for severe ice and snow driving. While not quite as effective as winter tires on heavy snow and ice, they come very close and are superior in wet and dry conditions than typical snow tires which are poor performers in anything other than snow and ice.

With this new breed of tires available, the only reason people should still consider snow tires is if they constantly drive in Nordic type conditions and drive on heavy snow and ice more than they drive on cleared roads. This type of driving is rare in the US. Far more typically most drivers, even in the northern snow belt where I live, mostly drive on cleared roads or light snow in the winter and only need to occasionally drive in heavy snow and ice during storms and before the roads are cleared.

So, unless you live in an area with Nordic type conditions, you may be better off with all-weather tires.

See this post for more information.
I know, late to the party, but this is exactly what I did. Cross Climates went on my Touring in January, and I immediately got to drive through that monster storm in Northern California / Oregon. I've also had it up at Crystal Mountain every weekend here in Washington. It's totally fine, even in the ridiculous B lot which is just a sheet of ice most of the time. Or a bowl of slush. Or both. The Ascent is so good in snow and ice.
 

·
Registered
2020 Subaru ascent premium 2003 Jeep Wrangler freedom edition
Joined
·
97 Posts
Good morning, I currently have the factory 20s on my 2020 Ascent and I'm looking to buy some winter tires along with rims before the snow starts falling. In the past, I've just gone with steel rims but want to get some fancier ones for the Ascent so I'm considering buying used. I've read through the forums and I'm under the impression that the Ascent is a difficult fit due to brake calipers so I've tried to stay as close to possible to the factory 18s.

Just wondering if anyone can comment on these and give me their opinion whether these will fit or not:

Bruh winter is over by me lmao I was confused. Edit did not see the date
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top