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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Out of pure curiosity today while driving down a quiet road at about 35mph I pressed the vehicle start button and held it...guess what happened?
The car shut off...yes..off..while driving,in gear...I pulled over shifted to park and restarted normal.
Does anyone else think this should not happen? Do all push button start cars act this way?
I only did this as an experiment to see what would happen and got my answer.
2019 premium here with all recent recalls done.
 

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Out of pure curiosity today while driving down a quiet road at about 35mph I pressed the vehicle start button and held it...guess what happened?
The car shut off...yes..off..while driving,in gear...I pulled over shifted to park and restarted normal.
Does anyone else think this should not happen? Do all push button start cars act this way?
I only did this as an experiment to see what would happen and got my answer.
2019 premium here with all recent recalls done.
Plenty of descriptions of this for various manufacturers' vehicles through a google search.
 

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Out of pure curiosity today while driving down a quiet road at about 35mph I pressed the vehicle start button and held it...guess what happened?
The car shut off...yes..off..while driving,in gear...I pulled over shifted to park and restarted normal.
Does anyone else think this should not happen? Do all push button start cars act this way?
I only did this as an experiment to see what would happen and got my answer.
2019 premium here with all recent recalls done.
Don't worry, it is working as designed.
Just like how in a keyed car, there is a method or mechanism for the driver to turn off the car, regardless of when it's in motion, the same applies to keyless cars.

You've just figured out how to do it in the Ascent.

Check Section 7-5, pages 315-317 of the Online 2019 Owner's Manual:
Page 317, in particular, will explain what you experienced. This also applies to the 2020, and can be found in the same section of that manual.
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Yeah, for emergency, like if the engine was on fire, you could stop pumping gas into it :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Good info and I'm not worried..its my wife's primary vehicle and would bet she along with others have no clue you could turn it off that way while driving. Just hadn't read much on the topic but seems like a common feature.
 

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I don’t think I’ve ever been in a moving vehicle in gear without the engine running. What happens? Does it cause you to slow down abruptly? Is it bad for the engine or tranny?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It just shut the engine off and acted like it was in neutral. I was able to slow down and go to the side of the road.I imagine if they built in the feature they built in safety for engine and transmission but I dont know.
 

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Maybe we should change the title to "Don't do this except in an emergency". I can give you good example of why you need to be able to shut the engine off while going down the road. Many years ago while driving from Oracle, Arizona to Phoenix I needed to pass another car on a two lane road. I floored the accelerator and passed the other car. When I backed off the throttle to slow down, the car kept accelerating. The throttle was stuck wide open. I could slow the car with the brakes, but as soon as I got off the brakes, it would resume acceleration. I used the brakes to keep my speed under control until we reached an area with wide shoulders. Then I turned off the ignition and stood on the brakes. The power steering lost power as soon as the engine died, but I got it the side of the road and stopped. Turns out that at full throttle the linkage to the cruise control actuator would go slack and then drop down and hang up on the throttle cable bracket. I disconnected it and tied it out of the way to finish my trip.

Granted that since the Ascent throttle is drive by wire this particular scenario won’t happen. However, you never know when fate is going to throw you a curve ball and you’ll have to deal with it.
 

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Yep. I had a beater 67 Chevy Nova with a 283 V8. If I floored it at the right rpm the engine would lift and rotate clockwise as viewed from the driver's seat and jam the throttle linkage full open. It'd either hit the rpm where the torque drastically dropped and the engine would sit down again, or I stepped on the clutch to achieve the same effect. There was a recall that wrapped a length of 1/8" cable with cable clamps around the engine mount to restrain the engine. It worked. Had it been an auto instead of a standard, the only options would have been turning off the ignition, or maybe try to shift into neutral.
 

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Turns out that at full throttle the linkage to the cruise control actuator would go slack and then drop down and hang up on the throttle cable bracket. I disconnected it and tied it out of the way to finish my trip.
Rick, that wouldn't by any chance have been on an Oldsmobile 307 V-8 engine, would it? I had an '84 Cutlass with the 307 and it was recalled for that very issue. There was a metal rod that connected the big cruise control servo to the throttle bail and it would drag along the intake manifold in certain situations and get stuck.

The fix was some clip that kept the rod from rotating and hanging down.
 

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Hokiefyd: It was a 1980 Datsun 200SX 5 speed with dealer installed cruise control. The aftermarket cruise control used a large bead chain to connect the servo to the throttle lever. Part of the installation procedure was to remove most of the slack from the chain after mounting the servo. The dealer failed to do this so when you went to full throttle manually the bead chain would tangle up up on the throttle bracket. All I had to do to fix it was remove the excess slack. The "funny" thing was that I had installed aftermarket cruise controls on the three cars we owned before the 200SX with no issues. When we bought the 200SX the only thing missing that we really wanted was the cruise control. I took one look at that seriously cramped engine compartment and decided to have the dealer install it. Obviously that was a mistake. On the plus side, having done three installs myself, I knew how to fix it!
 

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Out of pure curiosity today while driving down a quiet road at about 35mph I pressed the vehicle start button and held it...guess what happened?
The car shut off...yes..off..while driving,in gear...I pulled over shifted to park and restarted normal.
Does anyone else think this should not happen? Do all push button start cars act this way?
I only did this as an experiment to see what would happen and got my answer.
2019 premium here with all recent recalls done.
What's the difference if we now use a push button to turn the engine off and on versus the old key? Wondering why you would turn the engine off anyway while you are driving. Wouldn't that be dangerous without power steering and power braking?
 

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...and potentially locking the steering wheel.
Only do it on straight roads... but most importantly don’t do it. I had a manual car that had something which needed reset by killing the engine (don’t remember what it was) so I’d put it in neutral, kill the engine, hold t he clutch, key turned to ON, put it in 5th and keep driving. Only once did I do that on a slight curve. I’ve never been brave enough to kill the engine in an automatic
 

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I seem to be the old guy with all the anecdotes and stories. Oh well, here's another. It's kinda the opposite of the steering getting locked.

In the early '70s I had an old british sports car and one night I was driving down a road, the road bent left, and my car and I kept going straight right through a hedge into the front yard of a house. The steering wheel just spun in my hands. Looking under the hood I saw that a rubber donut type universal in the steering column had unbonded and become uncoupled. I quickly pushed it back together, backed through the hedge and headed home, continually applying forward pressure on the steering wheel to keep the universal from coming apart. I fixed it by tying it together with some 1/8" cable and cable clamps, not unlike what the dealer would later do to the engine mounts of my recalled '67 Chevy Nova.
 

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Just a reminder. Since the Toyota Unintended Sudden Acceleration fiasco, most contemporary vehicles have a safety system that allow constant hard breaking to throttle back engines.inbelieve it’s actually federally Mandated. No need to shut ignition down.

maybe Robert knows and can explain how it works with Subaru?
 

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Just a reminder. Since the Toyota Unintended Sudden Acceleration fiasco, most contemporary vehicles have a safety system that allow constant hard breaking to throttle back engines.inbelieve it’s actually federally Mandated. No need to shut ignition down.

maybe Robert knows and can explain how it works with Subaru?
Short version is, the car will boost brake pressure to overcome throttle force, and simultaneously decrease throttle.

We have had, for a decade or more, the advantage that the brake booster, brake controls are computer controlled to a ridiculous level of precision that's one of the best in any class, as we note from not just ABS using them, but, from the VDC using them with exacting precision to make our AWD one of the best out there. But, in addition to that, also for over a decade, we've had drive by wire throttles, meaning, it really doesn't matter if you mash the gas pedal - it's really the computer controlling the throttle.

Stanley Subaru has an old, but pretty decent description here:

 
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