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Hey all, I know there are threads discussing trade in's but I had a quick question. This thread will surely die out quickly.

Looking on feedback on whether or not its worth it to get my '03 Tacoma detailed before I get quotes on it for trade in value (and yes it needs it). Bottom line, will I actually get value out of the $150-200 value of a deep clean detail job?
 

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Here is my thought:
If you are trading to make the deal that day (for something in stock), then yes. I actually use this as a negotiating tool. I have generally be able to use this for a $250-500 increase on what they will put into my trade. I point out that it is a fresh detail, saving them from having to do it. I had one time, my engine bay was cleaner than the new vehicle I was taking delivery on. I also was not afraid to point it out.

If you are trading to order, then I would clean it up the best you can since you would potentially have to detail it twice.

Either way, I think everyone, even dealerships want to deal with good, clean cars. The easier you make it for them to resell your car, the more negotiating power you should have.
 

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Detail or not, I believe the dealers will try to rape and steal your money on any trade-in regardless. The key is to KEEP telling them no and get to the closest possible value you have in mind. As they make the more money on a trade in than they do on a new vehicle sale.

Ours was clean, very clean but they still tried to low ball us.

We traded in for our 17 Impreza Sports with 13k, KBB shows private party between 23-25K, trade in value of $19-20k. The car is also paid off with a clean title as we are the original owners. At first, the dealer wanted to give us $15.5k, I laughed at their face and said no, in my mind we want at least $19k. Then they came back and said how about $17k, I laughed at their face again and said no, I'd rather sell it or ride it for another 2 years and sell it for $18-19k.

Then right before we were going to sign the papers, they came back and said sorry.. that they will give me $18k for it. I thought about the hassle of selling it (with tire kickers and fake no shows) and decided to bite.

Honestly, no dealer will ever honor KBB trade in value, So from their prospective they were losing on making any extra money. We weren't afraid to say no, we weren't desperate and we were going to add a substantial amount to the trade-in as well. Besides, I believe when it's all said and done the dealership will probably make $3-$4k on this vehicle. They would've lost that. Bascially we left them with enough meat on the bone for them to bite. It was a win/win (sorta).

The State of Washington also has what's called a "used tax" law that on a trade-in you only pay taxes on the remaining balance. So for us, our trade-in value of $18,000 was worth at around $1600 in taxes we didn't have to pay. We only paid the remaining portion of the taxes, so that for us, was like selling the vehicle private party for close to $20k.

In the end, it's up to you, what do you want for it, what's your lowest or do you want to deal with hagglers, low ballers, tire kickers etc.
 

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Yeah, the whole world surrounding me trying to sell my 2008 Honda Pilot 4WD EX-L has been a lot of nonsense. I have it in great condition, low miles, clean inside and out. Couple of scratches on the back near bumper. Car max rated the entire vehicle in good condition throughout and gave me an 8k appraisal. I went on their website and they are selling lesser versions of my car with more miles for 12-14k!!! That is a massive markup and profit compared to what dealers get on a new car. ****, I would have taken between 10-11k for mine and they still would may a 2-4k profit minus any needed reconditioning and they are a no go. So unbelievably lame. If dealers would just be slightly fair it would work out for both sides. I doubt detailing would have done anything for my value although the car was hand washed inside and out by me.
 

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Why not sell on Graiglist yourself?

Dealer offer me 8k-9k for Sienna 2008. I sold in one day on Graiglist for 12.5k with two people waiting to buy as backup

You can meet in public place and make final transaction in the bank (which I did). Bring freind (or two) if don't feel comfortable.
 

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I would say that it's expected the dealers are going to need to do it the once-over regardless. Now, I wouldn't go in there with a dirty car, I'd give it a wash and vac before trading it in. That would be more to show the dealers "Hey, I'm ready to make a deal if you are - my car is all shiny and ready for trade"
 

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I personally did a quick interior / exterior detail (no paint correction) of the last vehicle we traded in (2012 Focus Hatch) and the dealer gave us close to "clean" KBB trade in value. The salesman mentioned that it was clean so they had no issues offering a fair price. I am sure if I hadn't detailed the car, we would have been offered at least $500 less, and not near the "clean" trade in value.

If your Tacoma looks fairly rough and dirty, but is in good shape mechanically, it may be worth the money to have it detailed. If there are other issues with your truck (or the dealer you are trading just plans to send it to auction since your truck is 15 years old) you may not reap any additional dollars. In the end, it is somewhat of a gamble of how your dealer accepts trades. At a minimum, you can use a clean vehicle as a bargaining tool, and you may be able to get well more than $200 back on your trade than you would have otherwise.
 

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Hey all, I know there are threads discussing trade in's but I had a quick question. This thread will surely die out quickly.

Looking on feedback on whether or not its worth it to get my '03 Tacoma detailed before I get quotes on it for trade in value (and yes it needs it). Bottom line, will I actually get value out of the $150-200 value of a deep clean detail job?
I just traded in my Tacoma and thought about the same thing. I ended up just doing my own personal detail. My trade in wasn't as high as I'd like, but I kind of expected that. I got 14k for my 2007 Tacoma TRD 2wd Off-Road with 42k miles. Carmax offered 10.5k.... talk about low ball. I did some mother's on the plastic and got it washed and a spray wax. Vacuumed it out + microfibered everything. I cleaned off the engine cover as well.

Mine was in great condition, but did have surface rust on the bottom as well as some scratches. It was a great truck, I was sad to let it go.

Detail or not, I believe the dealers will try to rape and steal your money on any trade-in regardless. The key is to KEEP telling them no and get to the closest possible value you have in mind. As they make the more money on a trade in than they do on a new vehicle sale.

The State of Washington also has what's called a "used tax" law that on a trade-in you only pay taxes on the remaining balance. So for us, our trade-in value of $18,000 was worth at around $1600 in taxes we didn't have to pay. We only paid the remaining portion of the taxes, so that for us, was like selling the vehicle private party for close to $20k.

In the end, it's up to you, what do you want for it, what's your lowest or do you want to deal with hagglers, low ballers, tire kickers etc.
Ey31's post is great advice and the tax bonus is great if you are in a state that does it. Sadly California did not so...yeah
 
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I wouldn't pay for a detail and just do a wash and wipe on my own. Unless maybe if you find a solid groupon for detailing services. I sold a 2011 Ram 1500 Sport Crew Cab with 80K to Carmax for $15,000, 30 minutes after getting the keys to my Ascent. KBB listed my truck for $17,500. Now add to this that my truck had no accidents on file and a full binder of maintenance records. It did have a fender replaced under warranty due to rust and that same fender was rusting again along with the one on the other side. New fenders plus paint would run someone 3-4K unless they planned on beating the truck to death. No dealer was willing to match Carmax and my truck wasn't going on a CarMax lot. It was going to Auction.

KBB pricing is a bit inflated without looking at the car in person. Dealers are going to try and make money on a used car. Typically 2-3K depending on make and model. Plus certified cars fetch a higher price tag since the same brand dealer can inspect and "assure" the buyer of the reliability. The thing with smaller dealers is their trade in price is based on local markets and they need to appeal to the market. Carmax is more competitive because they can move their inventory around their networks.
 

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My 2004 tacoma has total top paint issues. The hood and roof has gone from black to white. Sun damage. What would someone recommend before trying to sell it? I like this thread.
Hmmm, I'd say paint it or... there has been some guys doing like a black / carbon fiber vinyl wrap on the top. I think it'd be important to disclose that the paint has that issue though.
 
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My 2004 tacoma has total top paint issues. The hood and roof has gone from black to white. Sun damage. What would someone recommend before trying to sell it? I like this thread.
It’s a 14 year old car; most cars that old are going to have some paint issues. I wouldn’t do anything, a decent paint job will probably cost you much more then you’d make up in the sale. And a cheap paint job will make the car look worse.

If I were buying an old car, I’d like the fact that the paint looked old. It tells me that the car hasn’t been in an accident.
 

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I always wash my car and clean the interior before I take it to the dealer to be appraised. Since my cars are pretty nice at any given time, I see no need to pay for a detail. The dealer will still "charge" you around $500 for getting the vehicle ready for sale, no matter how clean it is. Just clean it the best you can and hope for the best. However, if it is filthy then I would pay someone $100-125 to clean it.

The dealer is going to use the "Blackbook," or "KBB" to evaluate the trade.

Most people trade their car in to the dealer for the tax benefits and/or the simplicity of the transaction. We just traded in my daughter's car. We would have sold it on Craigslist, but:

  • It was licensed in Minnesota
  • My daughter lives in New Jersey
  • Both my wife and my daughter are on the title
  • There is still money owed to Kia Motor Finance
  • We live in Colorado

Not a simple transaction if we went the Craigslist route.

Take off ALL accessories you may have added to the vehicle - they will not increase the trade-in value one iota. They may even lower the value. Examples include: larger tires/wheels/weathertech floor mats/dash cam/HID lighting/LED lighting/cargo nets/cargo mats/winch/dual batteries/etc.
 

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Hey all, I know there are threads discussing trade in's but I had a quick question. This thread will surely die out quickly.

Looking on feedback on whether or not its worth it to get my '03 Tacoma detailed before I get quotes on it for trade in value (and yes it needs it). Bottom line, will I actually get value out of the $150-200 value of a deep clean detail job?
No, we don't care if its dirty or not. Its going to be detailed by the dealership regardless. We look for major issues (broken/missing parts, body damage, etc) If anything, cleaning the car may make any flaws stand out more. I'm sure the wash rack kid will appreciate the lessened amount of work, but the dealership likely uses a targeting system to value your trade based off year/miles less estimated repairs needed to sell the car. A few fries under the seat and bugs on the windshield won't matter.

Its the same reason why you don't put new tires on the car, the dealership doesn't care. As long as the vehicle is safe to drive, we'll sell it.

The dealer is going to use the "Blackbook," or "KBB" to evaluate the trade.
Maybe blackbook, probably not KBB. Mannheim is what the largest auto groups use. its wholesale pricing because if they have to auction a used car (more frequent than you'd think) they don't want to lose money.
 

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I wouldn't pay for a detail and just do a wash and wipe on my own. Unless maybe if you find a solid groupon for detailing services. I sold a 2011 Ram 1500 Sport Crew Cab with 80K to Carmax for $15,000, 30 minutes after getting the keys to my Ascent. KBB listed my truck for $17,500. Now add to this that my truck had no accidents on file and a full binder of maintenance records. It did have a fender replaced under warranty due to rust and that same fender was rusting again along with the one on the other side. New fenders plus paint would run someone 3-4K unless they planned on beating the truck to death. No dealer was willing to match Carmax and my truck wasn't going on a CarMax lot. It was going to Auction.

KBB pricing is a bit inflated without looking at the car in person. Dealers are going to try and make money on a used car. Typically 2-3K depending on make and model. Plus certified cars fetch a higher price tag since the same brand dealer can inspect and "assure" the buyer of the reliability. The thing with smaller dealers is their trade in price is based on local markets and they need to appeal to the market. Carmax is more competitive because they can move their inventory around their networks.
^^^Smart man. Only a few dealers honor KBB pricing, trade value is often pretty close to what the TMV is on the vehicle, and no dealer is going to give you TMV for a car if they plan on staying in business. Most dealers use a tool that shows what every other dealer reporting paid for X car with Y miles (nationally and regionally) and they offer accordingly while making sure they can still afford to send the car to auction without losing their shirt. Why buyers have such an issue with a company turning a profit is beyond me.

Letting the salesman get some meat off the bone, make the managers happy, and you'll get things fixed a lot quicker in the future, if you repeat business they'll treat you very fairly, and all of that is worth a lot more than 1000 bucks when you're calling your salesman 2 months later and he won't return your calls because you screwed him out of his electricity bill.
 

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The six dealers I have dealt with in the last 3 years have all used KBB to show me the value of my vehicle. They may not use it for the in house pricing, but they want to make the consumer feel a little better.

I am sharing this video because this guy is a so funny. He does make some good points about automotive car sites and publications (KBB, TrueCar, etc) are all interrelated in some way. The dealers are offering the consumer far less for their used cars and asking much more for resale. The spread between the two has increased substantially in recent years.

I think for a dealer to make $5,000 on a $15,000 used car is too much. I recently traded in a 2012 Camry Hybrid for $11,000 and they are attempting to sell it for $15,898. That is being a little too greedy. You won't get much sympathy from me for new/used car dealers. They add fabric protection/paint protection/theft protection to the car and tell you that it is non-negotiable. Ridiculous.

 

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The six dealers I have dealt with in the last 3 years have all used KBB to show me the value of my vehicle. They may not use it for the in house pricing, but they want to make the consumer feel a little better.

I am sharing this video because this guy is a so funny. He does make some good points about automotive car sites and publications (KBB, TrueCar, etc) are all interrelated in some way. The dealers are offering the consumer far less for their used cars and asking much more for resale. The spread between the two has increased substantially in recent years.

I think for a dealer to make $5,000 on a $15,000 used car is too much. I recently traded in a 2012 Camry Hybrid for $11,000 and they are attempting to sell it for $15,898. That is being a little too greedy. You won't get much sympathy from me for new/used car dealers. They add fabric protection/paint protection/theft protection to the car and tell you that it is non-negotiable. Ridiculous.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUwx3TEJuAs
not able to view the video, but there are a few reasons they're 'trying' to sell your car at 15,898. 1) someone may actually pay that and the salesman can actually earn some money that month. 2) This is a very important reason, more than likely the purpose of their 15,898 price tag: They can mark it down and advertise a car with slashed prices. Its all marketing. Would they love to sell the car for 16 grand? Absolutely. Do they expect to? No. They also make a lot less than you probably think on new and used vehicles. As an example...Perhaps they had to put $2000 into your car to make it ready to sell, now they've only marked it up $3000, which is less than the markup on the Ascent at MSRP.

Additionally, if you think the used car market is volatile now, I'd implore you to talk to a sales manager that was in the business in the mid 80s. used car pricing (trade and sell value) is much more fair than it used to be. There are a lot of things that consumers aren't supposed to know simply because it gives them enough data to get angry over, but not enough to make sound judgement. It is not the dealers fault if someone over pays for a used car, or if they trade in their car for not enough money.

The solution is to find a dealer that is honest (there are a lot of them out there now) and a salesman who is himself and allows you to buy a car at your own speed and will give you honest opinions on the deal you're getting. Don't get greedy though, if you go into a dealership and it takes 3 hours to close because you want invoice pricing and top dollar for your trade, the salesman is going to quickly realize he's spending hours only to make $100 bucks. If its a high volume dealership where a salesman can sell 30 cars a month he might not mind. If its 99.99% of the other dealerships where a salesman might sell 6-10 subarus a month he's gonna be less inclined to help you out.

TL;DR: Find a salesman who you trust. Ask around, look at google/online reviews to see if individual salesmen are mentioned. If he's good, and you don't fit the saying "Buyers are liars" then he'll work with his sales manager to get you a good value on a trade, and a great deal on whatever you're buying.
 

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My dealer said it didn't matter if I detailed it or not. They run it through the same process regardless.


That said, I detailed my 2013 Expedition and sold it for $3000 more than the trade-in offer.



Dealers take trade-ins to make money. And they make a LOT of money on used cars. You are almost always better off selling it yourself, but do your homework on the value and take into consideration any sales tax advantages when trading. Some states let you offset the sales tax by the amout of your trade-in.
 

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I recently traded in a 2012 Camry Hybrid for $11,000 and they are attempting to sell it for $15,898.
The key word in your statement is 'attempting'. Chances are that no one will actually pay that price. And it's a bit of a joke in the business, but we know that customers invariably ask for $2,000 off. Don't know why that's the magic amount, but for some reason or other, it is.

We all know you can make more money selling your car yourself. Just had a customer that KBB Trade-in Marketplace hit the value at $17,500, we offered her $19,000, and she sold it herself for $21,000. When you pull up KBB or any of those sites that show a price range, they're going to show you an inflated price, to drive you into the dealership, because that's based upon ALL of the cars of that model and year, with no regard for mileage or condition. Then when I put the actual VIN number in and the actual condition of the car - and no, we don't care about whether it's detailed or not, but if you come in with dead rats under the seat (which has happened), we WILL deduct for that condition - that's why the KBB number is normally a lot lower.

It's also the dealership philosophy, too. We'd rather sell 100 used cars every month that we make an average $500 - $1,000 apiece on in front end gross profit than have 50 cars sitting on the lot that we paid too much for and sit around for 90 days that we have to send to auction and we don't sell squat. It's a turn and burn thing - volume and speed of selling. Get one that you make $3,000 on, the next you lose $2,000 on. Just part of it.
 

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The key word in your statement is 'attempting'. Chances are that no one will actually pay that price. And it's a bit of a joke in the business, but we know that customers invariably ask for $2,000 off. Don't know why that's the magic amount, but for some reason or other, it is.

We all know you can make more money selling your car yourself. Just had a customer that KBB Trade-in Marketplace hit the value at $17,500, we offered her $19,000, and she sold it herself for $21,000. When you pull up KBB or any of those sites that show a price range, they're going to show you an inflated price, to drive you into the dealership, because that's based upon ALL of the cars of that model and year, with no regard for mileage or condition. Then when I put the actual VIN number in and the actual condition of the car - and no, we don't care about whether it's detailed or not, but if you come in with dead rats under the seat (which has happened), we WILL deduct for that condition - that's why the KBB number is normally a lot lower.

It's also the dealership philosophy, too. We'd rather sell 100 used cars every month that we make an average $500 - $1,000 apiece on in front end gross profit than have 50 cars sitting on the lot that we paid too much for and sit around for 90 days that we have to send to auction and we don't sell squat. It's a turn and burn thing - volume and speed of selling. Get one that you make $3,000 on, the next you lose $2,000 on. Just part of it.
I suppose this is the real issue. I got 4 trade-in estimates on my 2012 Camry. They all said they were using KBB. The first one was from a Honda dealer, $9,500. The next was a Ford dealer, $10,000. The next was EchoPark, $12,000. Finally, a different Ford dealer, $11,000. I really felt as though most of the dealers were just trying to steal the vehicle. We settled on the last Ford dealer, because we could get the tax advantage, as they had the vehicle we wanted to trade for. FYI, the vehicle sold for $15,000. The dealer had no more than $500 in prep on our Camry. It was immaculate.
 
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