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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So it does seem the Subaru limits the power to prevent CVT failure. This guys went a little overboard though

 

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Since you posted the video, twice, it get commented on twice:
My biggest takeaways from the video.....

0:55 Mods which could affect CVT (lift, wheels, tires)
1:19 Second owner of vehicle
2:09 Subaru Warranties the CVT transmission anyway

...yup, Subaru must suck when it comes to taking care of their customers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Since you posted the video, twice, it get commented on twice:
My biggest takeaways from the video.....

0:55 Mods which could affect CVT (lift, wheels, tires)
1:19 Second owner of vehicle
2:09 Subaru Warranties the CVT transmission anyway

...yup, Subaru must suck when it comes to taking care of their customers.
My takeaway is that the engine does cut power to try and save the trans and that is an indication of how much strain can't be placed on this trans. Inherently a weak design and i shouldn't take it off roading and should be careful when yanking my boat out of a sandy launch.

Your takeaway was that this video was posted to bash Subaru and CVTs are just as strong as a regular trans when lifted and fitted with different tires...which i think is false.

BTW- Subaru warranty or any other warranty is not always easy to rely upon....my 2013 Legacy has had a torque converter fail at about 60k and then shortly after transmission slipping or another torque converter issue, i don;t know for sure as they would not fix it the 2nd time around....ended up trading it in for anther Legacy a couple months ago. Plus who wants someone tearing apart their car....9/10 times it won't go back together like the factory had intended.

I think Subaru is one of the better brands and will continue to buy them as they offer alot for the money...i just want to know it's limits to avoid dealers AT ALL COSTS:)
 

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That's not my takeaway. CVT torque capabilities are determined by the clamping pressure in the pulley cones. This is well documented by experts. Our TR690 CVT has a higher clamping pressure to deal with the higher torque than almost all other TR690's. The TR690 in the Subaru WRX STI S4 tS probably has a much higher clamping pressure (or we do, to deal with the much higher towing load), and the clamping pressure in the regular WRX is probably someplace in between. The Foz XTs and Outback 3.6Rs have less torque than us.

Gearing is also different.

In a TR690, applied torque and load on the chain is a factor of the primary and secondary reduction gears, and wheel size and rear end gearing. When changing those, without changing clamping pressure of the CVT, there are issues. That also applies to the TR580.

Neither the TR580, nor the TR690 are run at max capable torque, nor anywhere near max capable torque. Regardless, they CANNOT be run at max torque (which is actually 14% less than design max, btw) without changing the clamping pressure. People who increase torque (or CVT load with bigger tires) without dealing with that will damage their CVT, not because of the design, but because the CVT must also be "tuned" to the increased torque/wheel size.

There's a company that's pulled apart the valve bodies to figure out exactly how to do that for aftermarket higher torque applications.

Anyway, he says absolutely nothing to indicate that Subaru is cutting power - because they aren't. I do know the differences and changes across much of the TR580 and TR690 line, btw, and he's confusing the "changes" between the TR690 and the follow-up TR580.

Additionally, he indicates he was already having problems since the day he bought the car.
 
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