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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just had my 2020 Ascent wrapped with a clear bra...full hood, bumper, fenders, a pillars, and a section above the windshield. We’ve had it back in to have the hood redone. The paint protection started peeling. Tech says the shape of the hood makes it hard for the product to stay in place.
Anyone else have issues like this? Should I just bag the full hood and go with half the hood? Or did I just pick the wrong place to get this done? It’s super frustrating because we don’t live close to this particular shop, and it has to stay overnight each time we go.
 

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I think you picked the wrong place. PPF rarely peels off, I've had some on my Forester for over a decade. I installed PPF on my Ascent over a year ago and it shows no sign of peeling.

What kind of PPF did you use? Hopefully it came with a warranty.
Did you do your doors? Can you post some pics, or send some my way? I've been lucky that all my "pinstriping" from off-roading has buffed out, but, obviously, I'd prefer protecting the clearcoat over having to repeatedly buff it. ;)
 

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I think you picked the wrong place. PPF rarely peels off, I've had some on my Forester for over a decade. I installed PPF on my Ascent over a year ago and it shows no sign of peeling.

What kind of PPF did you use? Hopefully it came with a warranty.
They say they use 3M. I’m thinking I just picked the wrong place. The Tech was complaining about the hood and said he may never do full hoods again. I’m just stressed because I paid them $1000 for this job. I’m hoping it all gets figured out, but with this place I’m losing faith.
 

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Did you do your doors? Can you post some pics, or send some my way? I've been lucky that all my "pinstriping" from off-roading has buffed out, but, obviously, I'd prefer protecting the clearcoat over having to repeatedly buff it. ;)
I didn't do the doors because under normal driving this isn't an area where you would get too many rock chips, although for your off-roading it would make sense. So far, I've done the front of my hood and the front bumper. The doors, being so relatively flat, would have been easier. I'm now waiting for warmer weather to do more because the material is far easier to apply in warm weather than in cold.

This was mainly an experiment to see if I could do my own PPF install because otherwise, I find the price of PPF too expensive. I can't see paying the price of a paint job to protect the paint. I simply emailed every PPF manufacturer I could find and asked for samples. I received so much I could do much more than I've already done. The hood was easy to do, the front bumper was considerably harder due to the complex curves. It takes practice, but the material is incredibly forgiving and allows you to reposition it many times. Even with my lack of experience, it came out quite well. I had issues trying to get out all the bubbles, however with time, they all eventually disappeared on their own anyway, which was nice.

I've tried taking photos, but the stuff is virtually invisible so there's really nothing to see, and that's exactly what you want.

You can buy PPF in bulk very inexpensively so if anyone with decent DIY skills wanted to try it, they could. Even if you don't succeed, you can't hurt anything because it can be removed without any damage to the paint. There are many YouTube videos that show and explain the installation procedure much better than I can.
 

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They say they use 3M. I’m thinking I just picked the wrong place. The Tech was complaining about the hood and said he may never do full hoods again. I’m just stressed because I paid them $1000 for this job. I’m hoping it all gets figured out, but with this place I’m losing faith.
3M is one of the top brands, although they have several versions. I used 3M PPF on my Ascent and had no issues. It hasn't lost its adherence at all since I installed it a year ago, in fact, with time it becomes more invisible because all the bubbles disappear.

Preparation is key, you have to remove every trace of wax or else it won't adhere properly. Perhaps that's where they messed up.

If the installation tech can't do full hoods, he has no business being a PPF installer. The hood is one of the easiest areas to do. The installers generally take only a week's instruction course to qualify as an authorized installer. Obviously, this does not ensure they'll do a good job. The best installers do such a good job that you have to look very closely to even realize the car has PPF. I think you just were unlucky with this particular installer. Hopefully they'll make it right for you.
 

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I didn't do the doors because under normal driving this isn't an area where you would get too many rock chips, although for your off-roading it would make sense. So far, I've done the front of my hood and the front bumper. The doors, being so relatively flat, would have been easier. I'm now waiting for warmer weather to do more because the material is far easier to apply in warm weather than in cold.

This was mainly an experiment to see if I could do my own PPF install because otherwise, I find the price of PPF too expensive. I can't see paying the price of a paint job to protect the paint. I simply emailed every PPF manufacturer I could find and asked for samples. I received so much I could do much more than I've already done. The hood was easy to do, the front bumper was considerably harder due to the complex curves. It takes practice, but the material is incredibly forgiving and allows you to reposition it many times. Even with my lack of experience, it came out quite well. I had issues trying to get out all the bubbles, however with time, they all eventually disappeared on their own anyway, which was nice.

I've tried taking photos, but the stuff is virtually invisible so there's really nothing to see, and that's exactly what you want.

You can buy PPF in bulk very inexpensively so if anyone with decent DIY skills wanted to try it, they could. Even if you don't succeed, you can't hurt anything because it can be removed without any damage to the paint. There are many YouTube videos that show and explain the installation procedure much better than I can.
Thanks! If I can figure out how to deal with the body side moldings, I may do it. Otherwise, I'll get a quote from a pro who can figure that out for me, lol! I know my limitations. ;)
 

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I think you picked the wrong place. PPF rarely peels off, I've had some on my Forester for over a decade. I installed PPF on my Ascent over a year ago and it shows no sign of peeling.

What kind of PPF did you use? Hopefully it came with a warranty.
an experienced installer should have no problem with the shape of the hood whatsoever. I’ve seen PPF installed on truck hoods with deep valleys and lots of contours.
 

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I had half of the hood, the front fenders, the door edges and the door handle cups done with SunTek at my favorite detailer. No issues in a year and a half. If the PPF can conform to the door cups, it certainly shouldn't have a problem with the hood. BTW, If I had to do it over again, I would do the full hood, not just the front half, dirt and pollen will collect at the edge of the PPF right across the middle of the hood. Not pretty! My wife thought the paint had cracked.
 

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We were down a tight rocky trail today, kayaks on the top. Trying to avoid pin striping left and right and to avoid the left and right boats from snagging trees. It would be nice to not have to worry about the sides. I'd consider getting the doors and fenders done.
 

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wrong place. There are good PPF installers that do full body wraps on exotic cars which would be more challenging than the Ascent to do.

Price is one thing, but quality of the installer is more important. Unless you can find that rare installer that is high quality with good pricing.

On my last car, I had it done... the detailer outsources the PPF to a guy that barely speaks English, but first it is in the preparation of the paint to get the PPF to adhere properly, which the detailer takes care of, then the PPF installation springs into action.
 
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